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Download Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender People with Developmental Disabilities and Mental Retardatio: Stories of the Rainbow Support Group ePub

by John D Allen

Download Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender People with Developmental Disabilities and Mental Retardatio: Stories of the Rainbow Support Group ePub
  • ISBN 1560233966
  • ISBN13 978-1560233961
  • Language English
  • Author John D Allen
  • Publisher Routledge; 1 edition (September 6, 2003)
  • Pages 170
  • Formats lrf azw doc txt
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Medicine and Health Sciences
  • Size ePub 1679 kb
  • Size Fb2 1349 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 278

Experience the birth of the first support group for sexual minorities with developmental disabilities! Reflecting an unprecedented development in the disabled and sexual minority communities, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender People with Developmental Disabilities and Mental Retardation: Stories of the Rainbow Support Group describes the founding, achievements, and history of a unique group providing support for people with developmental disabilities or mental retardation (DD/MR) who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender. In this pathbreaking book, group founder John D. Allen describes the Rainbow Support Group's beginnings in 1998 at the New Haven Gay & Lesbian Community Center in Connecticut and the ways in which it has been shattering myths and stereotypes surrounding people with mental retardation ever since. From the author: “Not only are people with DD/MR full human beings with the same needs and desires for intimacy and healthy sexual expression as people without intellectual disabilities, but the group is evidence that some people with DD/MR have an understanding of sexual orientation as well. Acknowledging that people with mental retardation are sexual is a new development in the human service field, but one that is still in the pre-Stonewall days regarding those who are gay. Although people with mental retardation are given unprecedented freedom to make personal vocational decisions, there is an unfounded expectation that they do not have a sexuality—let alone a homosexuality. Members of the Rainbow Support Group discuss the same concerns as other gay people, but in a support system that recognizes their unique perspective.” This insightful book shows how membership in the Rainbow Support Group addresses the very real fears and concerns of its members, including: being forced into heterosexual social situations, since that is the only available option for socialization dealing with being “outed” to peers and staff—since many DD/MR people are not their own legal guardians, this can lead to removal of privileges, various kinds of abuse, and other negative consequences in their day-to-day lives being ridiculed by unsupportive staff being excluded from family functions because of their sexual orientation It also illustrates the purely positive aspects of membership in the group, which provides: a place to learn appropriate ways to meet others, hear messages about safe sex, and feel empowered to advocate for their own intimacy needs an increased chance of finding a like-minded partner (although the group is certainly not a “dating service”) an avenue for members to connect with others like them and with the larger gay community in the area events to participate in, such as holiday parties, field trips, movie nights, and gay pride celebrations The author continues: “What is exciting are the positive outcomes displayed once an individual enters the group. Members quickly develop a sense of ownership and wear rainbow-emblazoned clothing to meetings. Everyone has joined the host community center to begin receiving regular mailings and event discounts. Supervising staff report that members perform better at work, have fewer behavioral issues, and experience a greater feeling of contentment. For people with mental retardation, just to be able to say the words 'gay,' 'lesbian,' 'bisexual,' and 'transgender' in an affirming environment is a cutting-edge breakthrough. What the group has accomplished and will hopefully continue to illuminate is the understanding that people with DD/MR are entitled to a whole life experience, including discovering and enjoying their sexuality.”

In this pathbreaking book, group founder John D. Allen describes the Rainbow Support Group's beginnings in 1998 at the New Haven Gay & Lesbian Community Center in Connecticut and the ways in which it has been shattering myths and stereotypes surrounding people with.

In this pathbreaking book, group founder John D. Allen describes the Rainbow Support Group's beginnings in 1998 at the New Haven Gay & Lesbian Community Center in Connecticut and the ways in which it has been shattering myths and stereotypes surrounding people with mental retardation ever since. From the author: Not only are people with DD/MR full human beings with the same needs and desires for intimacy and healthy sexual expression as people without intellectual disabilities, but the group is evidence that some people with DD/MR have an understanding of sexual orientation as well. Allen describes the Rainbow Support Group's beginnings in 1998 at the New Haven Gay & Lesbian Community Center in Connecticut and the ways in which it has been shattering myths and stereotypes surrounding people with mental retardation ever since

Molecular Biology of the Cell: Problems Book.

Molecular Biology of the Cell: Problems Book. Essential Cell Biology. In this pathbreaking book, group founder John D.

Stories of the Rainbow Support Group. dealing with being “outed” to peers and staff-since many DD/MR people are not their own legal guardians, this can lead to removal of privileges, various kinds of abuse, and other negative consequences in their day-to-day lives. being ridiculed by unsupportive staff. being excluded from family functions because of their sexual orientation.

Natasha Alexander (Newham Community Team for People with Learning Disabilities). Publication date: 1 April 2006. Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

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We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it. See our disclaimer. Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people with developmental disabilities and mental retardation - allen, john D. Specifications. Routledge, Taylor and Francis. We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything.

with Disabilities supports people with disabilities to improve their . Furthermore, participants often had to cope with mental health problems and had struggled with loneliness, depression and addiction.

with Disabilities supports people with disabilities to improve their body feelings and. self-esteem. The Sexual and Relationship Facilitators are trained by several people with. People with intellectual disability experience the same range of sexual needs and. desires as other people. Last but not least, our participants reported that they had been discriminated against. Coming out (revealing your sexual orientation) is not easy when you have an intellectual disability.

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Samowar
Great Trasaction
Zainian
This was a fascinating read, as it really opened my eyes to the needs of my students as they progress into adulthood. The discussion of the clients included in the book was intriguing, and the ramifications for those of us who are responsible for the education and care of disabled people were inumerable.
There were times that I blanched, thinking that a professional could really get into trouble with some of the situations that clients were placed in, but I would then remember that the clients were all adults, and that heterosexism prevents many disabled adults from experiencing appropriate peer interactions.
Perhaps the most important story to underscore caregivers need to support disabled adults in their pursuit of their sexuality was the story of the woman who met a partner on the internet. The subsequent manipulation and heartbreak by her cyber-partner shows how critical it is that we actually educate in and provide our students, clients or loved ones appropriate sexual outlets.
I would recommend this book to anyone who works with disabled adolescents or adults, or is the family member of a disabled adolescent or adult.