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Download Human Wildlife: The Life That Lives on Us ePub

by Robert Buckman

Download Human Wildlife: The Life That Lives on Us ePub
  • ISBN 0801874076
  • ISBN13 978-0801874079
  • Language English
  • Author Robert Buckman
  • Publisher Johns Hopkins University Press (February 14, 2003)
  • Pages 208
  • Formats txt rtf lit lrf
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Medicine and Health Sciences
  • Size ePub 1539 kb
  • Size Fb2 1608 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 766

Your body has 100 trillion cells, but only 10 trillion are human. The rest belong to the bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites that live on or in us. Some of these tenants are actually beneficial, aiding in the digestion process, for example. The majority of them neither help nor hurt us, but simply coexist with us. A few species, however, from the cholera bacilli to tapeworms and lice, can be dangerous, and sometimes deadly.

In Human Wildlife, Dr. Robert Buckman takes readers on a safari through the human body, pointing out the long-term residents, the itinerant visitors, the irritating vandals, and the ruthless invaders, carefully distinguishing between helpful friends, harmless acquaintances, and lethal foes. By turns funny, amazing, and alarming, Human Wildlife is an endlessly fascinating journey through our own private biospheres.

Along the way, we learn that one-third of the human race is allergic to dust mite feces; that bad breath is caused by bacteria living on the back of our tongues which release sulfur from the protein we eat; that live maggots are being successfully used to treat drug-resistant infections; that fresh sweat is odorless (the smell results from the activity of armpit bacteria); and that the average kitchen cutting board has more bacteria than the top of a toilet seat. Accompanied by stunning, full-color and high-magnification images of these myriad organisms, Dr. Buckman's informative and engrossing text is leavened with a delightful sense of humor.


In Human Wildlife, Dr. Robert Buckman takes us on an engrossingly detailed journey through the hoards of organisms that thrive within, on, and uncomfortably close to our bodies. The voyage includes a mix of humorous text and astonishing photographs

In Human Wildlife, Dr. The voyage includes a mix of humorous text and astonishing photographs. From bedbugs to bacteria, the doctor reminds us that even when we think we are by ourselves, we are never alone.

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Your body has 100 trillion cells, but only 10 trillion are human  . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Human Wildlife: The Life That Lives on Us as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Later, as Robert Buckman, he contributed as author or co-author to a series of What You Really Need to Know About. Human Wildlife: The Life That Lives on Us, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003. ISBN 978-0-8018-7407-9. books on common medical conditions, including cancer, asthma, high blood pressure, HRT (all 1999), diabetes, stroke, and irritable bowel syndrome (2000) Medical hiatus.

In Human Wildlife Robert Buckman takes us through a tour of the lives of the worms, bacteria, viruses and other creatures that live on and in us. I picked up this book after listening to an interview with Dr Buckman

then – in one of his sketches, the television series on surgery Your Life in Their . Robert Alexander Amiel Buckman, doctor, writer and broadcaster, born 22 August 1948; died 9 October 2011.

True, he took an unsparing view of medical matters even then – in one of his sketches, the television series on surgery Your Life in Their Hands re-emerged as Their Knife in Your Glands – but he was better known for the capering glee he communicated on stage. Health, mind and body books.

Personal Name: Buckman, Rob. Publication, Distribution, et. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. Toronto On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Human wild life : the life that lives on us, Robert Buckman. books on common medical conditions, including cancer, asthma, high blood pressure, HRT, (all 1999), diabetes, stroke, and irritable bowel syndrome (2000). This was also the title of a long-running series of information films that he presented, and in many cases also scripted, for John Cleese's production company Video Arts. What You Really Need to Know About Cancer:A Guide for Patients and their Families.

Robert Buckman (Buckman, Robert). used books, rare books and new books. Human Wildlife: The Life That Lives on Us: ISBN 9780801874079 (978-0-8018-7407-9) Softcover, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003 : How to Help and Support Someone. Find all books by 'Robert Buckman' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Robert Buckman'. Caring for Someone After a Stroke. ISBN 9781845731267 (978-1-84573-126-7) Softcover, BOOKMART. Human Wildlife: The Life That Lives on Us: ISBN 9780801874079 (978-0-8018-7407-9) Softcover, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003 : How to Help and Support Someone Who is Dying.

In Human Wildlife, Dr. Jeffrey C. May, author of My House is Killing Me! Current promotions. Bestsellers in General Biology.

Talk about Human Wildlife: The Life That Lives on Us


Anayajurus
Purchased USED off a mention in another book. Arrived nicely packed, and so (not!) used I might've just picked it off the shelf at Border's. Good book, copious detail, one or more pictures on every page. Yes, some of the pictures might make ya say "Eeeugh!" With knowledge comes risk. Still, probably the best $3 I've spent in quite a while. Strongly recommended, but you can't have mine, so you may not get the same bargain ;-))
Aver
This is the second review I have written for this book. The first somehow disappeared so now I will try again. My child was doing a presentation at his school and needed resources. I found this at a library. He could not put it down. I skimmed through it and was very impressed. So I bought it. The photographs are fantastic, the wording is very educational and quite hilarious, and there was so much information that, had there not been a 3 book minimum on the bibliography, this would have been the only one he needed. I cannot recommend it enough for any budding scientist.
Xwnaydan
An interesting approach to a sensitive subject. The author managed to inject a bit of humor into his delivery. I found it informative.
Tinavio
thank you
Kagaramar
As a parasitology professor, one of my goals is to desensitize students to REALLY disgusting images. (When I was growing up, I wanted to be a radio shock jock, but that never panned out, so I'm doing the next best thing.)

What better way to introduce them to DELIGHTFULLY DISGUSTING images than to show the dermatological (and other) manifestations of the organisms that inhabit the human body.

YOWZA!
Hamrl
This book is informative and humorously written. The author has wonderful pictures of these common creatures that we never see. It can be a little scary and gruesome to think of all the wildlife living in us, but Mr Buckman does a great job of spotlighting the creatures that call us home.
Trash Obsession
While the written contents of this book are engrossing and informative, I must say either the copy I received was improperly printed or those are the absolute worst images I have ever seen in a book. Every single picture, including the cover image are either out of focus or extremely low resolution. They couldn't even present a photo of a man's toenail in focus. Being a visual person and now losing my eyesight, I was really disappointed with the pictures in this book. One could have much better appreciated the pictures of these microscopic creatures if we could actually see what they look like
I read the 2003 paperback edition of the originally 2002 book.

Parasites, benign bacteria, human smells, suspicious hygiene issues, body horrors: This is the coffee-table book, "beautifully" pictured, which will dampen your appetite for coffee. (Where has that coffee cup been cleaned? Hopefully not in the kitchen sink!) Contemporarily, the general public is displaying serious lacks in education in the above essential topics. Count me in. After that easy to read and at times tremendously funny book I feel a bit more enlightened. But don't think, that book is all you would need to know about human wildlife. Additional books, more text oriented, are listed below.

As for the pictures: They are fascinating, as microscopic photography usually is. However, I am not THAT incredibly delighted with the quality of ALL the pictures. The best ones are taken from electron microscopes. The ones of the silvery monochrome type. Most of these have been colored for this book in the spirit of Andy Warhol. The funny thing is, the caption of only one picture reveals that, as if the others were in true colors. Yet, I have to say, the effect is entertaining. Not really scientific, but who cares? There are a lot of pictures of all the experts the author has consulted. (The author isn't an expert on the book's topics, but an oncologist in real life.) Pictures which are of debatable information value. As in: Give me more pictures to disgust... I mean to flabbergast me instead! Additionally, these portraits look like freeze frames taken from TV. Some maybe taken with a mobile. Actually, this book has been a six-part mini-series on the Canadian Discovery Channel known by the same title. The message being here: If I want a coffee-table book, I expect ALL pictures to be top notch. For a comparison enjoy A Grain of Sand: Nature's Secret Wonder, a scientific and entertaining coffee-table book of microscopic photography of beaches.

The content information is a plus: I have heard about maggot therapy, but I didn't know that the baby flies breath through their back ends, because their front ends are greedily headfirst engaged in our inflamed, rotten flesh. I knew about pheromones, but I didn't know that we wouldn't have any without bacteria. (Actually, I am in need of more in-depth information as I read elsewhere that pubic hair produce pheromones. This book vaguely mentions that bacteria TRANSFORM material into pheromones.) I knew that tapeworms are usually intersexual, but I didn't know about some tapeworm species which are successively so, i.e. not with all their segments at the same time. I am not entirely sure wether I wanted to know, what exactly house dust consists of. Well, actually, I DID wander about that many years ago, but now I preferred nobody had answered that question. Actually, it's a mild revelation compared to what happens when you leave your tooth brush in the bathroom...

Be aware that a lot of issues were little overstood in 2002, as the author mentions a couple of times. And that human knowledge currently doubles every five years. The bigger distance you have put between your presence of time and 2002, the more sense it makes to search for a new book in addition.

Another great book about parasites is Riddled with Life: Friendly Worms, Ladybug Sex, and the Parasites That Make Us Who We Are. If you are interested in more symbiotic body roomies, largely restricted to bacteria and in a systematic text book presentation, read the rather dry Microbial Inhabitants of Humans: Their Ecology and Role in Health and Disease. Much more grippingly written is Good Germs, Bad Germs: Health and Survival in a Bacterial World by a science journalist. Which is also about the history if antibiotic treatments and their failure due to mounting resistance. About former parasites, today our energy source and DNA family tree provider, mitochondria, read Power, Sex, Suicide: Mitochondria and the Meaning of Life. A more general biological approach of symbiosis is Liaisons of Life: From Hornworts to Hippos--How the Unassuming Microbe has Driven Evolution. A theoretic re-thinking, including reconstructing taxonomy and theories about gaia, read Symbiotic Planet: A New Look At Evolution. Another book with fewer, but some maybe juicier pictures (tongue with eyes!) is Parasite Rex : Inside the Bizarre World of Nature's Most Dangerous Creatures.