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Download The Forgotten Schools: The Baha'is and Modern Education in Iran, 1899-1934 (International Library of Iranian Studies) ePub

by Soli Shahvar

Download The Forgotten Schools: The Baha'is and Modern Education in Iran, 1899-1934 (International Library of Iranian Studies) ePub
  • ISBN 1845116836
  • ISBN13 978-1845116835
  • Language English
  • Author Soli Shahvar
  • Publisher I.B.Tauris (October 15, 2009)
  • Pages 288
  • Formats azw rtf docx doc
  • Category Educ
  • Subcategory Schools and Teaching
  • Size ePub 1846 kb
  • Size Fb2 1621 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 690

By the end of the nineteenth century, it became evident to Iran's ruling Qajar elite that the state’s contribution to the promotion of modern education in the country was unable to meet the growing expectations set by Iranian society. Muzaffar al-Din Shah sought to remedy this situation by permitting the entry of the private sector into the field of modern education and in 1899 the first Baha’i school was established in Tehran. By the 1930s there were dozens of Baha’i schools. Their high standards of education drew many non-Baha’i students, from all sections of society. Here Soli Shahvar assesses these ""forgotten schools"" and investigates why they proved so popular not only with Baha’is, but Zoroastrians, Jews and especially Muslims. Shahvar explains why they were closed by the reformist Reza Shah in the late 1930s and the subsequent fragility of the Baha’is position in Iran.


By the 1930s there were dozens of Baha’i schools. Their high standards of education drew many non-Baha’i students. I enjoyed reading Soli Shahvar's scholarly study of the Bahai's involvement in education in Iran

By the 1930s there were dozens of Baha’i schools. I enjoyed reading Soli Shahvar's scholarly study of the Bahai's involvement in education in Iran. He brings together much information from varied sources to provide an excellent overview of the topic. As a Bahai, I found it interesting to see how a scholar who is not a Bahai treated the topic.

The Forgotten Schools: The Baha'is and Modern Education in Iran, 1899-1934 (International Library of Iranian Studies). Download (pdf, . 3 Mb) Donate Read.

Here Soli Shahvar assesses these "forgotten schools" and investigates .

Here Soli Shahvar assesses these "forgotten schools" and investigates why they proved so popular not only with Baha’is, but Zoroastrians, Jews and especially Muslims. Shahvar explains why they were closed by the reformist Reza Shah in the late 1930s and the subsequent fragility of the Baha’is position in Iran. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

The Forgotten Schools book.

Although modern schools were established by foreign religious missions in Iran as early as the 1830s, these were . In 1899, the Madreseh-ye Tarbiyat, the first Baha’i school, was established in Tehran

Although modern schools were established by foreign religious missions in Iran as early as the 1830s, these were limited mainly to Christian areas and communities and were far from meeting the growing demands of the majority Shi’i population for modern education. Muzaffar al-Din Shah sought to remedy this situation by permitting the entry of the private sector into the field of modern education. In 1899, the Madreseh-ye Tarbiyat, the first Baha’i school, was established in Tehran.

When the Tarbiyat School was abruptly closed in December 1934, we all expected the ban to be lifted shortly

Tauris (International Library of Iranian Studies, Volume 1 1) 265 pp. + index, appendices. When the Tarbiyat School was abruptly closed in December 1934, we all expected the ban to be lifted shortly. Eventually, as described by Professor Shahvar, most of us engaged some of the Tarbiyat teachers as home tutors for the remainder of the year, and finally entered other schools the following year. I and a number of my Tarbiyat School friends were put in the Zoroastrian school.

International Library of Iranian Studies. 8integratedb/W Illustrations. Soli Shahvar is lecturer in the Department of History of the Middle East, University of Haifa. He completed his PhD at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), London. Country of Publication.

By the end of the nineteenth century it became evident to Iran's ruling Qajar elite that the state's contribution to the promotion of modern education in the country was unable to meet the growing expectations set by Iranian society. Muzaffar al-Din Shah sought to remedy this situation by permitting the entry of the private sector into the field of modern education and in 1899 the first Baha'i school was established in Tehran. By the 1930s there were dozens of Baha'i schools.

Soli Shahvar was born in Iran and received his MA in Middle Eastern and African History and his BA in Political .

Soli Shahvar was born in Iran and received his MA in Middle Eastern and African History and his BA in Political Science from Tel Aviv University. He then went on to receive his doctorate at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. He is a current Director at the Ezri Center for Iran and Persian Gulf Studies at the University of Haifa. He has published many works, including his book ‘The Forgotten Schools’: The Baha’is and Modern Education in Iran, 1899-1934.

Talk about The Forgotten Schools: The Baha'is and Modern Education in Iran, 1899-1934 (International Library of Iranian Studies)


GAMER
I enjoyed reading Soli Shahvar's scholarly study of the Bahai's involvement in education in Iran. He brings together much information from varied sources to provide an excellent overview of the topic. As a Bahai, I found it interesting to see how a scholar who is not a Bahai treated the topic. Dr. Shahvar appears well qualified to bring together the historical material from both secular and Bahai sources, and appears to have had good access to primary source material and other resources and scholars.

The price of the book is beyond the reach of more casual readers interested in the topic of Bahai education, but because of the valuable research and perspective that Shahvar gives the topic, it is worth the cost for the more dedicated student.

Dr. Rodney Clarken, Director of School of Education and Professor, Northern Michigan University
Slowly writer
Interesting history of education in Iran and the systematic oppression of the Baha'is by the various political regimes.
Gholbirius
This masterwork is more than only a story about a number of schools; it is a book about the history of education in Iran, it is about the potentials of the Iranian nation and its challenges, about the Bahá'í community and its visions and actions, about love and unity, about heroism and sacrifices, and it shows the power of service.