derrierloisirs.fr
» » Teaching the New Basic Skills: Principles for Educating Children to Thrive in a Changing Economy

Download Teaching the New Basic Skills: Principles for Educating Children to Thrive in a Changing Economy ePub

by Frank Levy,Richard J. Murnane

Download Teaching the New Basic Skills: Principles for Educating Children to Thrive in a Changing Economy ePub
  • ISBN 0684827395
  • ISBN13 978-0684827391
  • Language English
  • Author Frank Levy,Richard J. Murnane
  • Publisher Free Press (September 4, 1996)
  • Pages 272
  • Formats mbr lit docx txt
  • Category Educ
  • Subcategory Schools and Teaching
  • Size ePub 1385 kb
  • Size Fb2 1634 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 599

Fifteen years ago, a U.S. high school diploma was a ticket to the middle class. No longer. The skills required to earn a decent income have changed radically. The skills taught in most U.S. schools have not. Today the average 30-year-old person with a high school diploma earns $20,200, and the nation faces a future of growing inequality and division. Teaching the New Basic Skills shows how to avoid such a future. By telling stories of real people in real businesses and real schools, the book shows the skills students need to get decent jobs and how schools can change to teach those skills. Richard Murnane and Frank Levy begin by describing the hiring processes of best practice firms like Northwestern Mutual Life and Honda of America. In today's competitive economy, these firms search for applicants with the New Basic Skills -- the mix of hard and soft skills that all high-wage employers now require. Murnane and Levy then shift their analysis to schools, asking how they can more effectively teach these New Basic Skills. By using case studies the authors show that popular school reform proposals -- higher standards, school choice, national standards, charter schools, more money -- can only be the first half of a solution to the nation's school problem. When they work as advertised, they force a school to change the way it does business. But each of these reforms needs a second half, a strategy for guiding schools toward the changes that raise student skills. The authors show how that strategy rests on five management principles that focus a school on student achievement. These principles grow out of the experiences of real schools doing the dirty work of educational reform: an elementary school in East Austin, Texas organizing low-income Hispanic parents around higher educational performance, an affluent New England community retraining its teachers, the state of Vermont devising new ways to measure the math skills employers require, a Boston high school creating incentives for low-income minority students to devote more time and attention to schoolwork. Superintendents, governors and business leaders agree on the importance of this book as evidenced in the forewords by Robert Galvin, Chairman of Motorola, and Thomas Payzant, school superintendent of Boston. For those who care about the success of U.S. schools, Teaching the New Basic Skills is an optimistic guide to the future and a must read.

The New Basic Skills here defined are the fundamental tools necessary to compete in our global economy. Murnane and Levy feel that if .

The New Basic Skills here defined are the fundamental tools necessary to compete in our global economy. Dr. Rudolph F. Crew Chancellor, New York Public Schools Teaching the New Basic Skills provides important ideas for helping all schools, including those in New York City, better prepare students to prosper in a changing economy. K-12 schools would re-structure and have school administrators, teachers, parents and students follow five steps, more students would graduate twelfth grade with the basic skills of basic math and reading, problem solving skills, being able to work in groups, and make coherent presentations

Richard Murnane and Frank Levy begin by describing the hiring processes of best practice firms like Northwestern Mutual Life and Honda of America.

Richard Murnane and Frank Levy begin by describing the hiring processes of best practice firms like Northwestern Mutual Life and Honda of America. Murnane and Levy then shift their analysis to schools, asking how they can more effectively teach these New Basic Skills.

Richard Murnane and Frank Levy begin by describing the hiring processes of best practice firms like Northwestern Mutual Life and Honda of America

Richard Murnane and Frank Levy begin by describing the hiring processes of best practice firms like Northwestern Mutual Life and Honda of America. Murnane and Levy then shift their analysis to schools, asking how they can more effectively teach these New Basic Skills

Murnane, Richard . Levy, Frank.

Murnane, Richard .

book by Richard J. Murnane. Fifteen years ago, a . high school diploma was a ticket to the middle class.

skills: Principles for educating children to thrive in a changing economy 2010 12 and in writing, and be able to use personal computers for basic tasks. But only 50% of U. S. students leave high school without these skills.

& Levy, F. Teaching the new basic skills: Principles for educating children to thrive in a changing economy. NY: Free Press, 1996. OBSSR Workshop: Behavioral and Social Sciences in STEM Education July 13, 2010 12 and in writing, and be able to use personal computers for basic tasks.

Free Press, New York. has been cited by the following article: TITLE: Employability Skills as Perceived by Employers and University Faculty in the Fields of Human Resource Development (HRD) for Entry Level Graduate Jobs. AUTHORS: Bassou El Mansour, Jason C. Dean. KEYWORDS: Employability Skills, Human Resource Development, Soft Skills, Hard Skills. JOURNAL NAME: Journal of Human Resource and Sustainability Studies, Vo. N., March 30, 2016. ABSTRACT: The world of employment has changed dramatically, technology is impacting practices and experiences, and societies are becoming more global and.

Children should be taught Soft Skills" - Future of Education explained by Jack Ma - Продолжительность: 1:27 Soft . Programming in Visual Basic.

Children should be taught Soft Skills" - Future of Education explained by Jack Ma - Продолжительность: 1:27 Soft Skills FUNCLUB Recommended for you. 1:27. سمه لابونا عبد المسيح الاقصرى - Продолжительность: 45:55 amer amero Recommended for you.

Teaching the New Basic Skills: Principles for Educating Children to Thrive in a Changing Economy. Levy, . & Murnane, . Why the Changing American Economy Calls for Twenty-First Century Learning: Answers to Educators' Questions. New York: Martin Kessler Books, Free Press. New Directions for Youth Development, 2006(110), 53-62. Somers, . & Uribe, C. (2005).

uk/?book 0684827395 Teaching the New Basic Skills: Principles for Educating Children to Thrive in a Changing Economy Full, Best For Teaching the New Basic Skills: Principles for Educating Children to Thrive.

Talk about Teaching the New Basic Skills: Principles for Educating Children to Thrive in a Changing Economy


Ndlaitha
A remarkable book that gets right to the heart of what is missing in current K-12 education and what changes are needed to make K-12 graduates employable by industry so they can earn a "middle class" wage. The book is "skimable" as an easy read to get the major points, can be read in great detail to understand the research behind all the points and is a good reference work for both critics and practitioners in K-12 education.
Renthadral
I read this book because it was mentioned in the third edition of The Well Trained Mind.

This book was written over twenty years ago and thus is quite dated. If anything, the problem has worsened over time. As stated in the foreword by Thomas W. Payzant (Superintendent of Boston Public Schools), "As recently as the 1950s, twenty percent of the jobs in America were professional, twenty percent skilled and sixty percent unskilled. In the 1990s, the percentage of professional jobs is about the same, but skilled jobs have soared to sixty-plus percent while unskilled jobs have fallen below twenty percent." Thus, the skill set young people need today to achieve a middle class lifestyle is higher than it once was. Drs. Murnane and Levy state that employers want reliability, positive attitude and hard work as well as the "New Basic Skills:" knowledge of basic mathematics, high reading levels, problem solving skills, the ability to work in groups made of diverse members, the ability to make oral and written presentations, and knowledge of personal computers (p. 9).

Drs. Murnane and Levy feel that if U.S. K-12 schools would re-structure and have school administrators, teachers, parents and students follow five steps, more students would graduate twelfth grade with the basic skills of basic math and reading, problem solving skills, being able to work in groups, and make coherent presentations:

1. All who are concerned would agree that there is a problem.
2. Schools and school systems would provide the right incentives and opportunities for teachers to solve the problem.
3. Teachers would be trained in how to teach the "New Basic Skills."
4. Progress (or lack thereof) would be measured regularly.
5. Schools would persevere even in the face of problems and learn from mistakes because there is no magic bullet (p. 14).

There is one problem with this solution: employers are increasingly looking at a college degree for entry level jobs. Part of this is because of the lawsuit "Griggs v. Duke Power Co.," in which it was established that an employer cannot require hiring criteria not directly related to the job itself. Since it is legal shaky ground for an employer to use tests of skills to hire employees (since the employer will possibly have to justify how the skills tested are applicable to the job), many employers will no longer hire people without a college degree, since college graduates are more likely to have the "New Basic Skills" (p. 236). However, as the authors point out, "college is a very expensive employment agency" (p. 8).

The authors themselves also point out that "As late as 1979, a 30-year-old man with a U.S. high school diploma earned a yearly average of $27,700, in 1993 dollars. That income, combined with a wife's earnings from a part-time job, secured the family a solid place in the middle class. Then, almost without warning, the economy changed. By 1983 U.S. manufacturing, threatened by imports, was rapidly downsizing, and a 30-year-old man with a high school diploma earned an average of $23,000 a year, in 1993 dollars. By 1993, with computers transforming both U.S. manufacturing and U.S. services, a 30-year-old man with a high school diploma earned an average of $20,000." The authors further note that in 1993 half of all 30-year-old men have not had any education beyond high school (p. 3).

As the other reviewers pointed out, the authors use the case studies of Honda of America and Northwestern Mutual Life extensively to point out how employers look for the "New Basic Skills." I am not convinced that business is necessarily the model for public school education, who must educate all who enter their doors, as opposed to industry, who can choose whom to hire. However, knowing what skills employers look for in a potential employee is valuable. However, does this information still apply today, twenty years later?
Arashilkis
This book is about what it takes to get a good job in manufacturing (Honda, for example) or services (insurance) and how the schools are failing to provide students with the "new basic skills" which will enable them to get these jobs. The analysis of what's wrong is similar to other analyses, and it is accurate: the average high school graduate doesn't know very much and doesn't really care that he doesn't know much. My quarrel with this book is that the authors underestimate the difficulty of changing the situation. Improving operations at Honda in Marysville, Ohio, is NOT the same thing as trying to produce high quality students. Schools have become social service agencies, and learning enough to get a good job at Honda is only one of many purposes the schools serve, and on any given day it may not be the most important