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Download Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy ePub

by Emily Bazelon

Download Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy ePub
  • ISBN 0812982630
  • ISBN13 978-0812982633
  • Language English
  • Author Emily Bazelon
  • Publisher Random House Trade Paperbacks; Reprint edition (February 11, 2014)
  • Pages 416
  • Formats rtf txt rtf lit
  • Category Educ
  • Subcategory Schools and Teaching
  • Size ePub 1650 kb
  • Size Fb2 1862 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 747

NATIONAL BESTSELLERBeing a teenager has never been easy, but in recent years, with the rise of the Internet and social media, it has become exponentially more challenging. Bullying, once thought of as the province of queen bees and goons, has taken on new, complex, and insidious forms, as parents and educators know all too well. No writer is better poised to explore this territory than Emily Bazelon, who has established herself as a leading voice on the social and legal aspects of teenage drama. In Sticks and Stones, she brings readers on a deeply researched, clear-eyed journey into the ever-shifting landscape of teenage meanness and its sometimes devastating consequences. The result is an indispensable book that takes us from school cafeterias to courtrooms to the offices of Facebook, the website where so much teenage life, good and bad, now unfolds. Along the way, Bazelon defines what bullying is and, just as important, what it is not. She explores when intervention is essential and when kids should be given the freedom to fend for themselves. She also dispels persistent myths: that girls bully more than boys, that online and in-person bullying are entirely distinct, that bullying is a common cause of suicide, and that harsh criminal penalties are an effective deterrent. Above all, she believes that to deal with the problem, we must first understand it. Blending keen journalistic and narrative skills, Bazelon explores different facets of bullying through the stories of three young people who found themselves caught in the thick of it. Thirteen-year-old Monique endured months of harassment and exclusion before her mother finally pulled her out of school. Jacob was threatened and physically attacked over his sexuality in eighth grade—and then sued to protect himself and change the culture of his school. Flannery was one of six teens who faced criminal charges after a fellow student’s suicide was blamed on bullying and made international headlines. With grace and authority, Bazelon chronicles how these kids’ predicaments escalated, to no one’s benefit, into community-wide wars. Cutting through the noise, misinformation, and sensationalism, she takes us into schools that have succeeded in reducing bullying and examines their successful strategies. The result is a groundbreaking book that will help parents, educators, and teens themselves better understand what kids are going through today and what can be done to help them through it.Contains a new discussion guide for classroom use and book groupsPraise for Sticks and Stones “Intelligent, rigorous . . . [Emily Bazelon] is a compassionate champion for justice in the domain of childhood’s essential unfairness.”—Andrew Solomon, The New York Times Book Review   “[Bazelon] does not stint on the psychological literature, but the result never feels dense with studies; it’s immersive storytelling with a sturdy base of science underneath, and draws its authority and power from both.”New York   “A humane and closely reported exploration of the way that hurtful power relationships play out in the contemporary public-school setting . . . As a parent herself, [Bazelon] brings clear, kind analysis to complex and upsetting circumstances.”The Wall Street Journal   “Bullying isn’t new. But our attempts to respond to it are, as Bazelon explains in her richly detailed, thought-provoking book. . . . Comprehensive in her reporting and balanced in her conclusions, Bazelon extracts from these stories useful lessons for young people, parents and principals alike.”—The Washington Post

Sticks and Stones: Defeat. has been added to your Cart.

Sticks and Stones: Defeat. I believe I saw her 19 March 2013 on the DAILY SHOW quoting what she identified as "an academic" (in the book she identified Norwegian psychologist Dan Olweus). This individual's definition of bullying was; "verbal or physical harrassment that occurs repeatedly over time and involves an imbalance of power.

Sticks and Stones book.

Электронная книга "Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy", Emily Bazelon

Электронная книга "Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy", Emily Bazelon. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Аудиокнига "Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy", Emily Bazelon. Читает Rebecca Lowman. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Praise for Sticks and Stones Intelligent, rigorous.

Praise for Sticks and Stones Intelligent, rigorous. is a compassionate champion for justice in the domain of childhood’s essential unfairness. and closely reported exploration of the way that hurtful power relationships play out in the contemporary public-school setting.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Sticks and Stones : Defeating the Culture of. .Blending keen journalistic and narrative skills, Bazelon explores different facets of bullying through the stories of three young people who found themselves caught in the thick of it.

Blending keen journalistic and narrative skills, Bazelon explores different facets of bullying through the stories of three young people who found themselves caught in the thick of it. Thirteen-year-old Monique endured months of harassment and exclusion before her mother finally pulled her out of school.

In Sticks and Stones Emily Bazelon wants nothing less than for her readers, and her nation, utterly to.Ms. Bazelon draws on that experience to begin Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy

In Sticks and Stones Emily Bazelon wants nothing less than for her readers, and her nation, utterly to rethink bullying. Bazelon draws on that experience to begin Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy.

In Sticks and Stones, Emily Bazelon looks at the underbelly of bullying and ways to combat i. Whether they had been victims, bullies or bystanders didn’t seem to matter. These early experiences of cruelty were transformative, she writes, no matter which role you played in the memory reel. Bullying isn’t new. But our attempts to respond to it are, as Bazelon explains in her richly detailed, thought-provoking book.

After summarizing earlier his earlier work on bullying, the author shows how Bazelon’s narrative approach maps nicely onto a population-centered consideration of the problem.

What's in the Box? 1 x Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy.

Talk about Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy


Anarus
Emily does an excellent job of combining anecdotally appealing real life stories with valid, current research to produce a very readable, and at the same time very practical resource.
Zodama
Amazing book. Wrote an essay for my acceptance into grad school and utilized it as a reference.
SkroN
I got tired of the examples of such extreme bullying cases.
Sharpbringer
Good Price Works good
Ishnjurus
The first two parts of the books are set out in a way that makes them hard to follow, with three real life stories of bullying split over six chapters, with the second part of each story appearing in part two of the book so you have time to forget who was who and what was going on before you get back to it. Also it seems that Bazelon struggles to connect the points she wants to make to the stories she's relating. The third part is the weakest though, as it seems really unfocused and meandering, and she doesn't seem to back up a lot of what she says and ends up with a very weak conclusion that comes across as basically "I dunno, maybe Facebook could be more pro-active about stopping bullying?" Basically I feel like there wasn't really much information in this book, and what was there wasn't presented in a way that made any sort of point, other than "bullying is bad and we should probably do something about it but also there are other problems too."
Ffleg
Mahatma Gandhi is reported to have said, "The measure of a civilization is how it treats its weakest members." This statement could well be applied to this book.

The author of this book is a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School, is married and the mother of two sons. This book is a compilation of some research she did on the subject of bullying and possible solutions towards stemming its increase in our public school system. I believe I saw her 19 March 2013 on the DAILY SHOW quoting what she identified as "an academic" (in the book she identified Norwegian psychologist Dan Olweus). This individual's definition of bullying was; "verbal or physical harrassment that occurs repeatedly over time and involves an imbalance of power." Clearly the stories of Monique, Jacob and Flannery which the author spends a lot of time documenting were tragic stories of three more vulnerable young people having suffered the serious effects of bullying. Additionally it seems at least at first the author is very sympathetic towards these individuals.

After reading a number of reviews of this book, it appears there is a great deal of controversy surrounding it. I could not understand what people were struggling with until I read Chapter 6 Flannery. In this chapter, it appears that the author wants to give the perpetrators of bullying a pass because their victims, had either previously or at the time of their bullying, been suffering from emotional problems such as depression and anxiety and thus were more prone to self destructive behavior in the first place. Although she denies it, the author does seem to, at least in strong implication, blame the victims for the bullying they sustained. Ethically I have real problems with this. It seems that in these cases perpetrators should be held MORE responsible and punishment more severe than on bullies who had preyed on more emotionally healthy individuals. Of course one might accuse me of bias because for over 20 years I worked with military families in the area of domestic violence not limited to spousal abuse but including child abuse and neglect, sibling abuse, workplace violence and I guess you could easily include bullying in an area where one of your roles is to protect the victims of abusive behavior. Overall I suspect Chapter 6 was the most controversial.

The book is composed of three parts: Part I:Trouble, Part II:Escalation, Part III:Solutions and Part IV:What Next? This is followed by a secton on Frequently Asked Questions About Bullying and Resources for Readers. There is significant time spent on what has worked in dealing with school bullies and what has not. The book is worth reading if you can get past author bias.
Antuiserum
Quite well-written and journalistically professional/balanced as a book-- Emily Bazelon is a good journalist-- but that's also its problem. Her take is too shallow (in large part from low experience and too much integration of the big picture like an in-depth news story) for a book about bullies and stopping their behavior. As such, it takes too much "expert" input for granted. For an expose about what was really going on with Phoebe Prince-- that she was far less mentally well than anyone thought and adult neglect there was just about criminal-- this is the book to get. For discussions of specific anti-bullying programs (e.g., Olweus and PBIS) in real life and how Facebook actually deals with such behavior in cyberspace, it's pretty good and illuminating too. She knocks it out of the park there. No question. However, the unstated and unexamined assumption is the morally ambiguous one that bullies are misunderstood and kids are helpless without expert adult input to solve this (which underlies "conflict resolution" and the like). Other things may get some attention as worth a try, but either whuppin' a bully's butt ("conflict management," properly) or punishing him so that dosn't abuse other people definitely don't. She pre-emptively dismisses such punishment up front a deceptively easy and too hard to really do. And it's only "bullying" if there's no resistance still going on (that would be mutually-aggravating "drama," which could be anything from a disagreement to gang warfare, as we're told kids and Olweus differentiate in the book) and the bully is simply exploiting his target for kicks (although some lowlife abusing someone helpless IS pretty bad). Pretty much, it reduces bullying to Snidely Whiplash tormenting someone screaming "Leave me alone!" for the fun of it and that we can stop it by learning (with the proper adult expertise and patience) to be nicer to and more considerate of each other ("Kumbaya," not moral absolutes, need apply). Need a book about how to stop bullies? This isn't it.
The author looked at bullying from a variety of angles. I was concerned she might pursue an agenda but I found her approach unbiased. I was especially pleased that she addressed claims that some are expanding the definition of "bullying" beyond what was originally intended.