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Download Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities ePub

by Earl Shorris

Download Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities ePub
  • ISBN 0393320669
  • ISBN13 978-0393320664
  • Language English
  • Author Earl Shorris
  • Publisher W. W. Norton & Company; Subsequent edition (September 17, 2000)
  • Pages 320
  • Formats doc azw docx lit
  • Category Educ
  • Subcategory Schools and Teaching
  • Size ePub 1228 kb
  • Size Fb2 1915 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 374

"You've been cheated," Earl Shorris tells a classroom of poor people in New York City.

"Rich people learn the humanities; you didn't. . . . It is generally accepted in America that the liberal arts and humanities in particular belong to the elite. I think you're the elite." In this groundbreaking work, Shorris examines the nature of poverty in America today. Why are people poor, and why do they stay poor? Shorris argues that they lack politics, or the ability to participate fully in the public world; knowing only the immediacy and oppression of force, the poor remain trapped and isolated. To test his theory, Shorris creates an experimental school teaching the humanities to poor people, giving them the means to reflect and negotiate rather than react. The results are nothing short of astonishing. Originally published in hardcover under the title New American Blues.

Riches for the Poor book. Earl Shorris was an American writer and social critic.

Riches for the Poor book. Rich people learn the humanities; you didn't. He is best known for establishing the Clemente Course in the Humanities, named after baseball great and humanitarian Roberto Clemente. The Clemente Course is an "educational institution founded in 1995 to teach the humanities at the college level to people living in economic distress. He was critical of Western culture as "sliding towards Earl Shorris was an American writer and social critic.

The Clemente experiment begins - The Bard course - The curriculum - Variations and self-criticism - Other countries, other cultures - Conclusion: a dangerous corollary. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by AliciaDA on October 12, 2010.

The Clemente Course in the Humanities is an anti-poverty intervention for . But even Bloom with his emphasis on the Great Books fallsshort of what is required

The Clemente Course in the Humanities is an anti-poverty intervention for adults who self-identity as "poor" and humanities instructors. The course was created in 1995 by journalist Earl Shorris, who based the curriculum on a Socratic method of pedagogy and the "great books" canon of Robert Hutchins. Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities. New York: Norton But even Bloom with his emphasis on the Great Books fallsshort of what is required. An education which aims to defeat nihilismmust, at the very least, hold out the promise that through thecultivation of reason one may indeed arrive at the truth.

You've been cheated," Earl Shorris tells a classroom of poor people in New York City. To test his theory, Shorris creates an experimental school teaching the humanities to poor people, giving them the means to reflect and negotiate rather than react. It is generally accepted in America that the liberal arts and humanities in particular belong to the elite. I think you're the elite. In this groundbreaking work, Shorris examines the nature of poverty in America today. The results are nothing short of astonishing. Originally published in hardcover under the title New American Blues.

You've been cheated," Earl Shorris tells a classroom of poor people in New York City Books related to Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities. Books related to Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities.

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Earl Shorris (Chicago, 25 June 1936 – New York City, 27 May 2012) was an American writer and social critic. He was critical of Western culture as "sliding towards plutocracy and materialism.

The Clemente Course in the Humanities. Retrieved June 3, 2012. Vitello, Paul (June 2, 2012).

Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities W. W. Norton & Company (2000) ISBN 978-0393320664. In the Yucatan: A Novel W. Norton & Company (2000) ISBN 978-0-393-34202-4. The Life and Times of Mexico W. Norton & Company (2004) ISBN 978-0393059267. The Politics of Heaven: America in Fearful Times W. Norton & Company (2007) ISBN 978-0393059632. The Clemente Course in the Humanities. Earl Shorris, 75, Dies; Fought Poverty With Knowledge".

Rich people learn the humanities; you didn't. Why are people poor, and why do they stay poor? Shorris argues that they lack politics, or the ability to participate fully in the public world; knowing only the immediacy and oppression of force, the poor remain trapped and isolated.

Talk about Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities


Thetath
Needed this book for a class, it is an interesting perspective. A bit dense and can be a slog to get through.
artman
The author starts the book out by making the case that what distinguishes poor people from rich people is lack of access to "politics." By this, he means politics in the classical Greek sense of civic involvement. He says rich people it and poor people don't because poor people don't study the humanities (philosophy, history, classic literature.) He then hypothesizes that teaching poor people a rigorous introductory college level course on the great works of Western culture will give them politics and bring them up from poverty. He sets up just such a course, and documents the experience.
Interesting idea, and fantastic effort toward helping the poor, but the book ends without any significant analysis of whether his hypothesis was correct. He notes that some kids went on to college, and says a controlled study was beyond his scope. He never answers the questions (which he does raise) about the possibility that the successful students may have been self-selecting (by choosing to be in the course, and making it through) or may have been helped through all the attention or a mental exercise unrelated to the humanities.
Why on earth did he bother to put the reader through 100 pages of his quasi-religious reverence for the great books, then torture us with 100 more pages of reprinted course syllabuses and personal profiles, if he was never, ever planning to conclude with data (or even organized anecdotes) supporting his case?!
Bottom line: you will only like this book if you are an ivory tower academic with more of an interest in paying homage to the great books than solving problems related to poverty. If this is you, you'll have to be a die-hard leftist not to roll your eyes when he compares Bill Clinton to Jerry Falwell, and claims that social conservatives are unable to learn ethics.
Dagdardana
"Riches for the Poor" describes the development and application of the Clemente Course of Humanities, a rigorous survey of the humanities that includes political philosophy and diplomatics. Shorris sees the humanities, increasingly removed from public school curricula, as tools for disenfranchised students to become fully engaged citizens participating in democratic society. Now that this book has been out for several years, time has proven Shorris' theories, as new Clemente courses sprouted up in the United States and abroad. They have particularly taken root in indigenous communities where Western perspectives are studied in tandem with indigenous humanities and languages. Students have been inspired by Clemente courses to go back to college or enter college for the very first time. A good read about a promising movement in education.
Malak
what a great book I have just read. it wanders across the problem of poverty in the capitalist empire. it uses true examples for consolidating his argument and explains the alternative solution to this problem that seems a problem more from people of all classes rather than the "underclass".

it produced some sparks on the eagerness to learn more humanities and escape from the "surround of force" which most of us are influenced with.

I have really loved this book a lot and I hope some more can have the same experience i had in this eye-opener proposal that explicitly is aimed at the poor class, but affects the whole society.
Mojar
Riches for the Poor struggles under the weight of a provocative and problematic thesis: the idea that learning the humanities will deliver the poor from poverty into the wealth of a reflective, political mind and life. Shorris' book relies more heavily on theory then fieldwork, but his passion for his project is inspiring, and his commitment to seeing it through is evident from the Clemente Courses that have sprung up across the country since his founding of the first. Riches for the Poor is at heart a sociological text, told in large part from the bird's-eye view of an academic rather than from the more revealing pavement. It's worth the read for those interested in Shorris' theories and their applications, less worth it for those interested in their long-term implications.
thrust
There are no secrets revealed but before you get a quarter of the way through this book, you will feel enlightened by the absolutely important information Shorris shares in this great book. I really don't want to mention the material in the book because I don't want anything I say to put you off. Be that as it may, within these pages you will find essential eye-popping information that is statistically proven about education in the United States and the role of the Rich elite in creating a "surround" of poverty. Shorris is BRILLIANT and a pretty good writer. He has me riveted, as if I'm reading an engaging spy novel!
HIGHLY recommended!Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities
And to think I bought this with the intention of satisfying a college course requirement....