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Download Harvard Rules: Lawrence Summers and the Battle for the World's Most Powerful University ePub

by Richard Bradley

Download Harvard Rules: Lawrence Summers and the Battle for the World's Most Powerful University ePub
  • ISBN 0060568550
  • ISBN13 978-0060568559
  • Language English
  • Author Richard Bradley
  • Publisher Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (November 22, 2005)
  • Pages 416
  • Formats txt lrf docx rtf
  • Category Educ
  • Subcategory Schools and Teaching
  • Size ePub 1255 kb
  • Size Fb2 1513 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 804

It is the richest, most influential, most powerful university in the world, but at the beginning of 2001, Harvard was in crisis. Students complained that a Harvard education had grown mediocre. Professors charged that the university cared more about money than about learning. Harvard may have possessed a $19 billion endowment, but had it lost its soul?

The members of Harvard's governing board knew that they had to act. And so they made a bold pick for Harvard's twenty-seventh president: former Treasury Secretary and intellectual prodigy economist Lawrence Summers.

Although famously brilliant, Summers was a high-stakes gamble. In the 1990s he had crafted American policies to stabilize the global economy, quietly becoming one of the world's most powerful men. But while many admired Summers, his critics called him elitist, imperialist, and arrogant beyond measure.

Today Larry Summers sits atop a university in a state of upheaval, unsure of what it stands for and where it is going. At stake is not just the future of Harvard University but also the way in which Harvard students see the world -- and the manner in which they lead it. Written despite the university's official opposition, Harvard Rules uncovers what really goes on behind Harvard's storied walls -- the politics, sex, ambition, infighting, and intrigue that run rampant within the world's most important university.


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But Bradley addresses much more than simply the contentious start to Summer's tenure at Harvard. Bradley agrees that the evolution of Harvard in recent decades has seriously imperiled intellectual life on campus. On the one hand, he offers an insightful look at how the role of the American university president has changed from a moral and intellectual leader independent of political and corporate power to the administrator of an institution largely dependent on corporate and government largesse for its continued existence.

In the 1990s he had crafted American policies to stabilize the global economy, quietly becoming one of the world's most powerful men.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In the 1990s he had crafted American policies to stabilize the global economy, quietly becoming one of the world's most powerful men. But while many admired Summers, his critics called him elitist, imperialist, and arrogant beyond measure. Today Larry Summers sits atop a university in a state of upheaval, unsure of what it stands for and where it is going. At stake is not just the future of Harvard University but also the way in which Harvard students see the world - and the manner in which they lead it.

Bradley graduated from Yale University in 1986, and began working at. .Harvard Rules: The Struggle for the Soul of the World’s Most Powerful University (2005).

Bradley graduated from Yale University in 1986, and began working at The New Republic in Washington, . followed by Regardie's magazine. He then earned a master's degree in American history from Harvard University.

It is the richest, most influential, most powerful university in the world, but at the beginning of 2001, Harvard was in crisis. Students complained that a Harvard education had grown mediocre. Professors charged that the university cared more about money than about learning.

He was known for his many verbal battles with such icons as Cornell West.

book by Richard Bradley. It is the richest, most influential, most powerful university in the world, but at the beginning of 2001, Harvard was in crisis. He was known for his many verbal battles with such icons as Cornell West. He was also known for critiquing many of the political courses at Harvard that did not seek to educate but to indoctrinate. He was also criticized for accepting money for a sheikh connected to Islamism and allowing Harvard's name to be purchased by the United Arab Emirates, an apartheid state.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 347-364) and index. At the beginning of 2001, Harvard was in crisis.

Richard Bradley, the author of Harvard Rules: Lawrence Summers and the Battle for World's Most Powerful University, opined: "Suddenly, you couldn't just say this was an arcane legal dispute a really unattractive an.

Richard Bradley, the author of Harvard Rules: Lawrence Summers and the Battle for World's Most Powerful University, opined: "Suddenly, you couldn't just say this was an arcane legal dispute a really unattractive and deliberate pattern of behavior and cover-up that quite dramatically pointed an arrow at Larry Summers. When the president responded in a manifestly untruthful way to questions about the Shleifer case," said Putnam, "it had a devastating effect on the views of people who were to that point uncommitted, people who, like me, were strong supporters of his agenda.

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Books by Richard Bradley. Harvard Rules: Lawrence Summers and the Battle for the World's Most Powerful University (eBook). The Greatest Game: The Yankees, the Red Sox, and the Playoff of '78 (eBook). by Richard Bradley (Author). Category: Biographies & Memoirs, Education, History. Category: History, Sports & Outdoors.

Talk about Harvard Rules: Lawrence Summers and the Battle for the World's Most Powerful University


Netlandinhabitant
Awesome!
Dianalmeena
So much I never knew. Lots of background. Not very flattering for Summers. Frankly not leadership material. What more can I say?
BlackHaze
I read this book cover to cover in just over 3 days, which is very quick for me. I'm not sure what about the book hooked me. It might have been the tragicomic retelling of events at Harvard during the reign of Lawrence Summers, especially his encounters with students and faculty. Or it might have been the way the author sought to explain Summers' behavior as stemming from the lessons he learned serving in various government agencies. Or maybe it was the thoughtful profiles the author put forth of the various individuals who encountered Summers along the latter's career. Probably the biggest reason for me liking this book was how his profile of Lawrence Summers exemplifies all the traits, good and bad, of many that succeed in the 21st century. Emphasizing image as a way to divert peers away from substance, going thru the motions to appease stakeholders while reserving final decisions to one self, casting away the past to focus on the future, these and other traits characterize Lawrence Summers and others who reach the pinnacle of society. And this is probably the best reason to read this book; it shows what type of society America has become, who and what we've cast away and what he have gotten in return. All told, a great book and probably the best biography I have read in years.
Kaim
This is one of the first examinations of the Summers presidency at Harvard. The book examines the results of Laurence Summers, former treasury secretary and brilliant economist, when he served as president of Harvard. Summers was known for daring to oppose that anti-Israel lobby at Harvard and divestment. He was known for his many verbal battles with such icons as Cornell West. He was also known for critiquing many of the political courses at Harvard that did not seek to educate but to indoctrinate. He was also criticized for accepting money for a sheikh connected to Islamism and allowing Harvard's name to be purchased by the United Arab Emirates, an apartheid state.

But for all his controversy he may have been the greatest president of Harvard in the last thirty years. This book is partially a critique and partially a discussion of the ins and outs of the controversies surrounding him. He was critiqued so much because he tried to rock the boat at Harvard and he dared to question whether it was still providing the best education. Although this book might be a little heavy handed in claiming that Harvard students are groomed to run the world, it is an interesting examination of the role of Summers at the prestigious University.

Seth J. Frantzman
anneli
Disclaimer: I am not a fan of Larry Summers. I didn't care for him when I was an intern at Treasury, and as an alum I really don't care for him as president of Harvard. But even I think this book is unfair to Summers and goes too far in trying to villify the man.

Bradely has written a book that is very easy to read and draws almost all of the issues enveloping Harvard in easy to digest, black-and-white dramas between Summers (always in the black hat) and various members of the faculty and student body (always portrayed sympatetically). This book makes no pretence of being objective or looking any further than skin-deep at the controversies that surrounded Summers before the most recent blow-up over his comments on women in science. Several chapters end with essentially the same line: by doing X, Summers had further consolidated his rule over the university. If all of this is true (it's not), Summers would be the absolute dictator of Harvard Yard by now.

In fact, what has been written here is basically an expanded, book-edition copy of the Harvard Crimson from 2000 to the present. There is little new in the book that readers of Harvard's student newspaper don't already know other than a few re-interviews that Richard Bradley has done with various personalities involved in the recent events at Harvard.

What's lost here is that what is going on at Harvard is a microcosm of what's going on at many other American universities, and that much of it isn't new. As far back as I can remember (and I come from a family of academics), students and faculty alike have hated their university presidents, viewing them as uninterested in academics or out of touch with their student bodies. As at Harvard, with the decibel level of campus politics higher today than at any time since the 1960s, there is a lot of talking (or complaining, depending on one's perspective) going on and less respect for opposing viewpoints. Harvard is hardly unique in this respect.

Bradely castigates Summers for his handling of several episodes with faculty (most noteably the Cornel West debacle) but misses the broader trend that acadmics as a whole have been getting into narrower and narrower specalties that prevent their work from being of much use to anyone. This doesn't mean that Summers was justified in how he treated West, who was (and is) a true educator, but it does deny this book some much-needed context.

Similarly, Bradley's comments on Summers' stress on achievement by students misses that the same line was toed by the genteel Neil Rudenstine, who once told the Crimson that 'students don't come to Harvard to have fun' when asked why the university maintains an academic schedule that places fall term finals immediately after winter break. This was a particularly poor-timed comment after a rash of student suicides on campus and reports that Harvard's student suicide rate was twice the national average.

Overall, only the most die-hard Summers haters will find anything valuable in Harvard Rules. Everyone else interested in the state of campus would be better of reading the Crimson from time to time.
Risky Strong Dromedary
As a Harvard alum, I naturally tend to browse articles about politics at the university. So I was amazed by last Friday's front page article in The Wall Street Journal about the faculty revolt against the centralization of power under Harvard's president, Larry Summers. It seemed amazing that he could be so politically ham-fisted after his years spent in government. Richard Bradley's book is eye-opening: from Summers' unwillingness to attend Peter Gomes' service on the day he was installed as president (I remember Peter Gomes as a wonderful gentleman--the embodiment of Harvard ethics and culture--Larry Summers would have done well not to have missed it!) to his off-the-record smear of Professor Cornel West to the New York Times reporters ("What would you do if you had a professor with a sexual harassment problem?") Summers is a manifestation of inside-the-beltway power grabbing that ill-befits a Harvard president. The book is fast-paced and engrossing. I recommend it highly (and you might as well get it at Amazon because it isn't available at the Harvard Coop!)