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Download Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of Earth (The MIT Press) ePub

by Tyler Volk

Download Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of Earth (The MIT Press) ePub
  • ISBN 0262720426
  • ISBN13 978-0262720427
  • Language English
  • Author Tyler Volk
  • Publisher The MIT Press (March 28, 2003)
  • Pages 291
  • Formats lit mobi docx azw
  • Category Engineering
  • Subcategory Engineering
  • Size ePub 1536 kb
  • Size Fb2 1695 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 151

An engaging introduction to the emerging field known as Earth physiology, or geophysiology.

The concept of Gaia resonates with a wide range of people―from nature lovers, theologians, and philosophers to environmental and earth systems scientists. The term, which scientist James Lovelock, originator of the Gaia hyposthesis, borrowed from Greek mythology, refers to the interacting system of life, soil, atmosphere, and ocean. Like the interiors of organisms, Gaia contains complex cycles and material transformations driven by biological energy. Gaia's inclusion of life means that from some perspectives it resembles life. But Gaia also differs from organisms in significant ways. Although it has changed through time, it does not evolve in a Darwinian sense. Whereas organisms are open, flow-through systems, Gaia is relatively closed to material transfer across its borders. It exists according to its own level of operating rules, a level as complex as that of organisms and the subject of the emerging field known as Earth physiology, or geophysiology. Blending science and evocative imagery, Gaia's Body offers an engaging introduction to this new field. It explains how every important chemical in the atmosphere is regulated by living processes―why, for example, strange, spaghetti-like bacteria off the coast of Chile have an intimate connection with the plants in Long Island backyards; why "biochemical guilds" may be Earth's most important unit of life; and how scientists have detected the biosphere's "breathing." The book includes a Preface written for the paperback edition.


He is the author of Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of the Earth (MIT Press, 2003), Metapatterns: Across Space . This book is required reading for all those interested in how the parts of global biosphere ("Gaia") interact

He is the author of Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of the Earth (MIT Press, 2003), Metapatterns: Across Space, Time, and Mind, and other books. Series: The MIT Press. This book is required reading for all those interested in how the parts of global biosphere ("Gaia") interact. It is pleasure to read, thanks to the knowledge and writing talent of the author. Volk introduces the concept of a metabolizing Gaia, with its parts consisting of kingdoms, cycles, pools, et. depending on the perspective of the observer.

Toward a Physiology of Earth. He is the author of Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of the Earth (MIT Press, 2003), Metapatterns: Across Space, Time, and Mind, and other books. An engaging introduction to the emerging field known as Earth physiology, or geophysiology. Full of fresh and stimulating perspectives on Earth System science for any student or teacher in that field.

He is the author of Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of the Earth (MIT Press, 2003), Metapatterns: Across Space . MIT Press began publishing journals in 1970 with the first volumes of Linguistic Inquiry and the Journal of Interdisciplinary History

He is the author of Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of the Earth (MIT Press, 2003), Metapatterns: Across Space, Time, and Mind, and other books. MIT Press began publishing journals in 1970 with the first volumes of Linguistic Inquiry and the Journal of Interdisciplinary History. Today we publish over 30 titles in the arts and humanities, social sciences, and science and technology.

Gaia's Body is Tyler Volk's answer to this question

Gaia's Body is Tyler Volk's answer to this question. In this book, he describes the environment that enables the biosphere to exist; various ways of looking at its "anatomy" and "physiology," the major biogeographical regions such as rainforests, deserts, and tundra; the major substances the biosphere is made of; and the chemical cycles that keep it in balance. He then looks at the question of whether there are any long-term trends in earth's evolution-is Gaia growing colder? more complex?-and examines the role of humanity in Gaia's past and future

Gaia's Body is Tyler Volk's answer to this question

Gaia's Body is Tyler Volk's answer to this question. He then looks at the question of whether there are any long-term trends in earth's evolution-is Gaia growing colder? more complex?-and examines the role of humanity in Gaia's past and future

Start by marking Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of Earth as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Start by marking Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of Earth as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of the Earth.

The key is "combogenesis," the building-up from combination and integration to produce new things with innovative relations. Themes unfold in how physics and chemistry led to biological evolution, and biological evolution to cultural evolution. Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of the Earth. Metapatterns: Across Space, Time, and Mind. Columbia University Press.

Gaia's Body : Toward a Physiology of Earth. it brings the Gaia concept to the heart of science

Gaia's Body : Toward a Physiology of Earth. By (author) Tyler Volk. it brings the Gaia concept to the heart of science.

Tyler Volk is Professor of Biology and Science Director of Environmental Studies at New York York University, and author of Metapatterns, CO2 Rising, and other books, such as Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of Earth, and Death and Sex, co-authored with Dorion Sagan. He attended and presented at many meetings on the Gaia Hypothesis. Dr. Lorraine Olendzenski is Associate Professor of Biology at St. Lawrence University. She studies and teaches the evolution of the earliest microbes on Earth

Talk about Gaia's Body: Toward a Physiology of Earth (The MIT Press)


Samowar
Nature's pieces, parts, systems, time and forces explored and shown as they work together - in the creating and recycling of 'life' on our green and blue planet.
Virtual
When James Lovelock first proposed the Gaia theory in the mid 1970's it was greeted with skepticism. So it is with every new scientific paradigm.
The notion that the world is alive is not new. In some form or another, it has been with us throughout history. Indeed, the name "Gaia" is itself borrowed from Greek mythology. As a scientific theory, however, Gaia represents a brand new way of looking at our world.
In the past two decades, the Gaia theory has been moving inexorably into the scientific mainstream. Gaia's Body is a significant contribution to that process.
Proving the existence of Gaia by anything but circumstantial evidence requires the application of hard science, and that is exactly what Gaia's Body offers. The book is a brilliant, and original, look at the scientific basis of the earth's vast and interconnected regulatory systems. Tyler Volk's style is engaging, and although much of Gaia's Body is technical, he manages to bring Gaia down to earth for those of us without a background in science. It's the kind of book you'll want to keep on the bookshelf, to be enjoyed again and again.
I highly recommend this delightful book, and look forward to more such masterpieces from Tyler Volk. I'd give the book more than five stars if I could. Richard R. Hofstetter Lawyer, author of Mobius.
Gerceytone
This book is required reading for all those interested in how the parts of global biosphere ("Gaia") interact. It is pleasure to read, thanks to the knowledge and writing talent of the author. Volk introduces the concept of a metabolizing Gaia, with its parts consisting of kingdoms, cycles, pools, etc., depending on the perspective of the observer. He suggests the fundamental "actors" in this metabolism are biochemical "guilds", such as nitrogen fixers, and respirers, which cut across divisions such as kingdoms. In Volk's interpretation, Gaia is not a living organism, nor does it or its parts necessarily remain at homeostasis, but it has a metabolism, a geophysiology. His calculations of the phenomenal surface areas of bacteria and fungi demonstrate the potential of life as a powerful geological force. I am proud to say that some of Volk's discussion draws on our very fruitful collaboration studying the biotic influence on weathering and climate, which started from our first meeting at the historic American Geophysical Union conference on Gaia in 1988.
Lanadrta
Tyler Volk created a thoughtful and well written book that clearly defines the biogeochemical mechanisms that govern the biosphere. Reading this book is like reading a gripping who-dunit - you don't want to put it down.
The "Gaia in Time" chapter captivated me with its analogy of viewing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels as an integral of a complex web of biogeochemical cycles. How this proxy was shifted by cryptogamic microbial crusts, photosynthetic organisms, nitrogen fixers, non-photosynthetic sulfide oxidizers, land plants, and calcareous plankton fascinated me.
If you read one book on the Gaia hypothesis, this should be it.
Nakora
If you believe Science is unnecessarily baffling,...if you believe our Earth is suffering because of an unexamined drive for "progress",...if you enjoy masterful writing,...READ "GAIA'S BODY: Toward a Physiology of Earth..!" Dr. Tyler Volk has worked as a principle researcher for NASA on how a global system supports life. He is not only at the top of his field, Atmospheric Chemistry, but he writes with humility, warmth and immediacy. Even if you don't understand ALL of the "hard Science", you will be delighted at what Tyler Volk DOES render easily understood. If you, like Karl Popper, would like hierarchies to remain as they are, and prefer a harsh, thwarting sort of Science, proceed at your own discomfort. If you love learning, and believe it should be a pleasure, proceed happily!