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Download Fundamental Principles of Polymeric Materials (Society of Plastics Engineers Monographs) ePub

by Stephen L. Rosen

Download Fundamental Principles of Polymeric Materials (Society of Plastics Engineers Monographs) ePub
  • ISBN 0471575259
  • ISBN13 978-0471575252
  • Language English
  • Author Stephen L. Rosen
  • Publisher Wiley-Interscience; 2 edition (January 1993)
  • Pages 448
  • Formats doc mbr lrf docx
  • Category Engineering
  • Subcategory Engineering
  • Size ePub 1613 kb
  • Size Fb2 1389 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 789

Revised due to new developments in the polymer area. This book contains a broad, unified introduction to the subject matter that will be of immediate practical value plus a foundation for more advanced study. New features include a discussion of liquid-crystal polymers, the Flory-Huggins theory, group-transfer polymerization, a quantitative treatment of Ziegler-Natta polymerization with three new worked-out examples and much more. Also, end-of-chapter problems have been added along with practical illustrations of the material.

by Stephen L. Rosen (Author).

by Stephen L. Christopher S. Brazel.

Fundamental principles of polymeric materials fundamental principles of. .

Xvi, 346 pages : 24 cm. Previously published as: Fundamental principles of polymeric materials for practicing engineers. A Wiley-Interscience publication. Includes bibliographical references (pages 332-333) and index. I. Introduction - pt. 1. Polymer Fundamentals. II. Types of Polymers. III. Bonding in Polymers. V. Polymer Morphology. VI. Characterization of Molecular Weight. VII. Polymer Solubility and Solutions. Transitions in Polymers - pt. 2. Polymer Synthesis. IX. Step-Growth (Condensation) Polymerization.

Principles of Polymeric Materials (Society of Plastics Engineers Monographs). Be the first to ask a question about Fundamental Principles of Polymeric Materials. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

Revised due to new developments in the polymer area. Contains a broad, unified introduction to the subject matter that will be of immediate practical value plus a foundation for more advanced study. Fundamental Principles of Polymeric Materials (Society of Plastics Engineers Monographs). 0471575259 (ISBN13: 9780471575252).

Following a brief introduction, Fundamental Principles of Polymeric Materials is divided into four . 18 polymer applications: plastics and plastic additives 361.

18 polymer applications: plastics and plastic additives 361. Introduction 361. Plastics 361.

Download books for free. Revised due to new developments in the polymer area. Contains a broad, unified introduction to the subject matter that will be of immediate practical value plus a foundation for more advanced study

Download books for free. New features include a discussion of liquid-crystal polymers, the Flory-Huggins theory, group-transfer polymerization, a quantitative treatment of Ziegler-Natta polymerization with three new worked-out examples and much more. End-of-chapter problems have been added along with practical illustrations of the material.

Following a brief introduction, Fundamental Principles of Polymeric Materials is divided into four parts: Part .

Stephen L. Rosen, PHD, CHE, is a former Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Missouri-Rolla.

Talk about Fundamental Principles of Polymeric Materials (Society of Plastics Engineers Monographs)


Datrim
This book was written as an introduction to polymeric materials for upper-level undergraduates and beginning graduate students. As introductions go, it is amongst the best available for chemical engineers. Chemistry is covered in detail, but the sections on polymer properties set this book apart. Additionally, there are excellent chapters at the end covering advanced application topics. Overall, this is a superb work by Brazel and Rosen that will be invaluable to the engineer, chemist, and materials scientist.
Fordregelv
My Prof was the author. And the head of my dept. How could I not love this book?
BlackBerry
Bought this one for class. It was very helpful and well written. It may look old, but for the class I was taking it did a great job of explaining all I needed to know.

I would definitely recommend this book.
Shezokha
Overall a good book however it lacks depth/answer key for the questions posed at the end of each chapter but the examples given are explained well enough.
Rude
The book came rapidly and is in good shape. I don't have anything more to say; this is silly to require more.
Enila
Perfect condition! great book.
Mr.mclav
FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF POLYMERIC MATERIALS,3rd ed., is a 407-page hardcover book on polymer chemistry. The book has 22 chapters, where the titles are:
1. Introduction
2. Types of polymers
3. Molecular structures of polymers
4. Polymer morphology
5. Characterization of molecular weight
6. Thermal transitions in polymers
7. Polymer solubility and solutions
8. Step-growth polymerization
9. Free-radical addition polymerization
10. Advanced polymerization methods
11. Copolymerization
12. Polymerization practice
13. Rubber elasticity
14. Introduction to viscous flow
15. Linear viscoelasticity
16. Polymer mechanical properties
17. Processing
18. Plastics and plastic additives
19. Rubbers
20. Synthetic fibers
21. Surface finishes and coatings
22. Adhesives

My background and training is in biochemistry, molecular biology, and organic chemistry. But my only polymer laboratory experience was in polypeptides and routine manufacture of polyacrylamide. I ordered this book because I presently write patents, including patents on polymers, and I needed some background information. Brochures on polymer products are fine, but certainly do not have the breadth and detail as a textbook. I am writing patents on various polymers used for medical devices, such as catheters and stents, as well as for polymers used to coat medical devices and prevent adhesion of bacteria and platelets.

Chapter 1 starts very gently, and we read that an "automobile contains over 300 pounds of plastics, and in addition includes paints, the rubber in tires, and fibers in tires and upholstery" (page 1). Chapter 1 also includes a page of structures, showing functional groups such as alkane, alcohol, ether, anhydride, epoxy, imide, urethane, isocyanate, and so on. Chapter 2 discloses the genus of polymers known as "thermoplastics," and we learn that these include polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyvinylchloride (PVC), and polystyrene (PS). The chapter describes the practical use of these various thermopolymers, and we also learn another concept: "thermosetting polymers." Next, the book provides diagrams of condensation reactions used to make polymers, and the diagrams illustrating the reactions have arrows and dotted lines showing what group reacts with what other group. (I am beginning to love this book, because it is careful to disclose concepts that provide a context (relevant practical uses) and concrete information such as mechanisms of reaction. Page 15 shows the mechanism of reaction for polyurethane formation, and we read that "the hydrogen from the alcohol is transferred to the nitrogen atom of the isocyanate group." Later on in the same chapter, we see diagrams of branched polymers, random polymers, block polymers, and cross-linked polymers. Pages 24-29 provide a table with names of polymers and a chemical diagram of the relevant monomer. (Very useful and very concrete, to ensure that readers understand the topic!) Moving along, Chapter 3 has commentary and diagrams on VINYL POLYMERS, and we read that the side chains can be oriented: (1) Atactic; (2) Syndiotactic; and (3) Isotactic. The text and the figures are consistent with each other, as one might expect, and this makes it easy on the reader. Regarding these three terms, we read that they were devised by Giulio Natta who won the 1964 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Using an analogy that anybody can understand, we read that "atactic" polyproplylene has a consistency like chewing gum, whereas the other two forms are rigid.

Chapter 4 concerns morphology, and we read about amorphous and crystalline polymers, and there is a simple mathematical formula that relates crystalline phase, amorphous phase, and density. The text explains the units that are in the formula (unit of W, subscript C, and subscript a). The formula also has the unit "p" but this chapter seems not to explain what is "p." My guess is that the unit "p" means density in grams per cubic centimeter. The next page has a useful table that provides real-life examples of densities, where low density is 0.910 to 0.925 grams/cm3, medium density is 0.926 to 0.940 grams/cm3, and high density is 0.941 to 0.965 grams/cm3. This table also provides tensile strength, hardness in the unit Shore, and flexural modules. This book is great, because of its generous use of examples.

The next chapter, Chapter 5 (page 61 to 90) concerns molecular weight, and here there are eleven pages of mathematics, which require calculus. But the following chapter does NOT have any mathematics at all, and in Chapter 6 we learn that some polymers (polystyrene) are "glassy plastics" at room temperature, but that other polymers (polybutadiene, polyisoprene) are glassy only when cooled in liquid nitrogen. We learn about a unit (Tg glass transition temperature), and we see a graph showing that Tg represents a point of discontinuity in experiments where you heat the polymer gradually and determine the corresponding volume.

Jumping way ahead to Chapter 17 (no math in this chapter), we read about molding, extrusion, blow molding, slush molding, calendaring, stamping, casting, fiber spinning and so on. This chapter is generously illustrated with ink drawings of machines used for these processing methods.

CONCLUSION. The book will be useful to chemists needing a detailed introduction to the chemistry of plastics and related polymers. Also, the book will be useful to technical writers such as myself, who need to understand a little about polymers for patent work. About half of the chapters include several formulas in calculus. However, even the chapters with calculus have sections of text (stretches of narrative) that do not involve calculus. Thus, at least 85% of the book will be comprehensible to readers who do not have training in calculus
FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF POLYMERIC MATERIALS,3rd ed., is a 407-page hardcover book on polymer chemistry. The book has 22 chapters, where the titles are:
1. Introduction
2. Types of polymers
3. Molecular structures of polymers
4. Polymer morphology
5. Characterization of molecular weight
6. Thermal transitions in polymers
7. Polymer solubility and solutions
8. Step-growth polymerization
9. Free-radical addition polymerization
10. Advanced polymerization methods
11. Copolymerization
12. Polymerization practice
13. Rubber elasticity
14. Introduction to viscous flow
15. Linear viscoelasticity
16. Polymer mechanical properties
17. Processing
18. Plastics and plastic additives
19. Rubbers
20. Synthetic fibers
21. Surface finishes and coatings
22. Adhesives

My background and training is in biochemistry, molecular biology, and organic chemistry. But my only polymer laboratory experience was in polypeptides and routine manufacture of polyacrylamide. I ordered this book because I presently write patents, including patents on polymers, and I needed some background information. Brochures on polymer products are fine, but certainly do not have the breadth and detail as a textbook. I am writing patents on various polymers used for medical devices, such as catheters and stents, as well as for polymers used to coat medical devices and prevent adhesion of bacteria and platelets.

Chapter 1 starts very gently, and we read that an "automobile contains over 300 pounds of plastics, and in addition includes paints, the rubber in tires, and fibers in tires and upholstery" (page 1). Chapter 1 also includes a page of structures, showing functional groups such as alkane, alcohol, ether, anhydride, epoxy, imide, urethane, isocyanate, and so on. Chapter 2 discloses the genus of polymers known as "thermoplastics," and we learn that these include polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyvinylchloride (PVC), and polystyrene (PS). The chapter describes the practical use of these various thermopolymers, and we also learn another concept: "thermosetting polymers." Next, the book provides diagrams of condensation reactions used to make polymers, and the diagrams illustrating the reactions have arrows and dotted lines showing what group reacts with what other group. (I am beginning to love this book, because it is careful to disclose concepts that provide a context (relevant practical uses) and concrete information such as mechanisms of reaction. Page 15 shows the mechanism of reaction for polyurethane formation, and we read that "the hydrogen from the alcohol is transferred to the nitrogen atom of the isocyanate group." Later on in the same chapter, we see diagrams of branched polymers, random polymers, block polymers, and cross-linked polymers. Pages 24-29 provide a table with names of polymers and a chemical diagram of the relevant monomer. (Very useful and very concrete, to ensure that readers understand the topic!) Moving along, Chapter 3 has commentary and diagrams on VINYL POLYMERS, and we read that the side chains can be oriented: (1) Atactic; (2) Syndiotactic; and (3) Isotactic. The text and the figures are consistent with each other, as one might expect, and this makes it easy on the reader. Regarding these three terms, we read that they were devised by Giulio Natta who won the 1964 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Using an analogy that anybody can understand, we read that "atactic" polyproplylene has a consistency like chewing gum, whereas the other two forms are rigid.

Chapter 4 concerns morphology, and we read about amorphous and crystalline polymers, and there is a simple mathematical formula that relates crystalline phase, amorphous phase, and density. The text explains the units that are in the formula (unit of W, subscript C, and subscript a). The formula also has the unit "p" but this chapter seems not to explain what is "p." My guess is that the unit "p" means density in grams per cubic centimeter. The next page has a useful table that provides real-life examples of densities, where low density is 0.910 to 0.925 grams/cm3, medium density is 0.926 to 0.940 grams/cm3, and high density is 0.941 to 0.965 grams/cm3. This table also provides tensile strength, hardness in the unit Shore, and flexural modules. This book is great, because of its generous use of examples.

The next chapter, Chapter 5 (page 61 to 90) concerns molecular weight, and here there are eleven pages of mathematics, which require calculus. But the following chapter does NOT have any mathematics at all, and in Chapter 6 we learn that some polymers (polystyrene) are "glassy plastics" at room temperature, but that other polymers (polybutadiene, polyisoprene) are glassy only when cooled in liquid nitrogen. We learn about a unit (Tg glass transition temperature), and we see a graph showing that Tg represents a point of discontinuity in experiments where you heat the polymer gradually and determine the corresponding volume.

Jumping way ahead to Chapter 17 (no math in this chapter), we read about molding, extrusion, blow molding, slush molding, calendaring, stamping, casting, fiber spinning and so on. This chapter is generously illustrated with ink drawings of machines used for these processing methods.

CONCLUSION. The book will be useful to chemists needing a detailed introduction to the chemistry of plastics and related polymers. Also, the book will be useful to technical writers such as myself, who need to understand a little about polymers for patent work. About half of the chapters include several formulas in calculus. However, even the chapters with calculus have sections of text (stretches of narrative) that do not involve calculus. Thus, at least 85% of the book will be comprehensible to readers who do not have training in calculus.