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Download Out of the Channel: The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill in Prince William Sound ePub

by John Keeble

Download Out of the Channel: The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill in Prince William Sound ePub
  • ISBN 0060163348
  • ISBN13 978-0060163341
  • Language English
  • Author John Keeble
  • Publisher HarperCollins; 1st edition (March 1, 1991)
  • Pages 290
  • Formats mobi docx lit lrf
  • Category Engineering
  • Subcategory Engineering
  • Size ePub 1500 kb
  • Size Fb2 1698 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 277

Examines the Valdez oil spill in Alaska, describing the economics and politics that produced it, the inadequate response, and efforts to alleviate the damage

The Exxon Valdez oil spill occurred in Prince William Sound, Alaska, March 24, 1989, when Exxon Valdez, an oil tanker owned by Exxon Shipping Company, bound for Long Beach, California, struck Prince William Sound's Bligh Reef, . mi (. km) w. .

The Exxon Valdez oil spill occurred in Prince William Sound, Alaska, March 24, 1989, when Exxon Valdez, an oil tanker owned by Exxon Shipping Company, bound for Long Beach, California, struck Prince William Sound's Bligh Reef, . km) west of Tatitlek, Alaska, at 12:04 . local time and spilled 1. million US gallons (260,000 bbl) (or 37,000 metric tonnes) of crude oil over the next few days. It is considered to be one of the worst human-caused environmental disasters

Out of the Channel book.

Out of the Channel book. Ten years later, the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound remains the largest tanker spill in the history of North America, and in its devastating effects upon wildlife and habitat, arguably the most damaging tanker spill in the history of the world.

Examines the Valdez oil spill in Alaska and efforts to alleviate the damage. John Keeble's astute observation, not just of the scene, but of its historical and moral surround, is far more than reportage

Examines the Valdez oil spill in Alaska and efforts to alleviate the damage. John Keeble's astute observation, not just of the scene, but of its historical and moral surround, is far more than reportage. His rendering of an occurrence that was covered sensationally and incoherently by mass media is a great service; his decent, careful treatment of Captain Hazelwood's role in the spill is alone worth the book.

Ten years later, the March 25, 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince .

Ten years later, the March 25, 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound remains the largest tanker spill in the history of North America, and in its devastating effects upon wildlife and habitat, arguably the most damaging tanker spill in the history of the world. Justice Department, and the State of Alaska. 363 pages, 38 col photos, maps.

Download Out of the Channel: The EXXON Valdez Oil Spill in Prince William Sound.

Ten years later, the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound remains the largest tanker spill in the history .

Ten years later, the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound remains the largest tanker spill in the history of North America, and in its devastating. Justice Department, and the. State of Alaska - the largest such environmental settlement ever.

David Lebedoff is an attorney and writer in Minnesota

David Lebedoff is an attorney and writer in Minnesota. Lebedoff served as a board chair of the University of Minnesota and the Minneapolis Institute of the Arts, and has served on the boards of the Blake School, the Minneapolis Club, and the University of Minnesota Foundation. Lebedoff wrote Cleaning Up: The Story Behind the Biggest Legal Bonanza of Our Time, a book about the Valdez oil spill lawsuit against the Exxon Corporation.

Out of the Channel: The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill in Prince William Sound (nonfiction), HarperCollins, 1991, revised and . John Keeble's Yellowfish "is a novel of self-discovery disguised as a thriller," wrote Rick DeMarinis in the Chicago Tribune Book World

Nocturnal America, University of Nebraska Press (Lincoln, NE), 2006. Also author of the television documentary To Write and Keep Kind, PBS, 1993. John Keeble's Yellowfish "is a novel of self-discovery disguised as a thriller," wrote Rick DeMarinis in the Chicago Tribune Book World. This is not to say that it fails on either level. On the contrary, John Keeble has managed to convince us that the act of self-discovery is a thrilling, dangerous adventure.

The Exxon Valdez oil spill was a manmade disaster that occurred when . Prince William Sound had been a pristine wilderness before the spill. John D. Rockefeller (1839-1937), founder of the Standard Oil Company, became one of the world’s wealthiest men and a major philanthropist.

The Exxon Valdez oil spill was a manmade disaster that occurred when Exxon Valdez, an oil tanker owned by the Exxon Shipping Company, spilled 11 million. The Exxon Valdez disaster dramatically changed all of that, taking a major toll on wildlife. Born into modest circumstances in upstate New York, he entered the then-fledgling oil business in 1863 by investing in a Cleveland, Ohio.

Talk about Out of the Channel: The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill in Prince William Sound


Modred
Having been tangentially involved in this matter, I found this book to offer a worthwhile commentary. I found the writing style somewhat ponderous but the scientific aspects of the subject do not readily lend themselves to small talk. I recommend it to readers who will also spend time researching additional sources. (The price of this book was de minimis!)
lifestyle
Newspaper stories about the oil spill created the impression that the cause of the accident was simply that the captain was drunk. This book shows that the real situation was far more complex. The captain was definitely not drunk. He did have a few drinks, which is against regulations. Even after all the analysis it is not clear what exactly went wrong. The fact that the captain had a few drinks was not the only breach of regulations. None of the officers had a six-hour off duty time in the twelve-hour period before departure. The ship was single hulled instead of double hulled as was foreseen when the oil terminal was built. When Congress granted permission to build the pipeline and the terminal one of the conditions was that there would be a state-of-the-art contingency plan for oil spills. There was nothing of the sort. A Vessel Traffic Services station was supposed to monitor the movement of the ships through the strait. Due to cost cutting measures the station was unable to monitor the movement of the ship. A major cause of inefficiency in the clean up was the lack of clarity about who was in charge, the Coast Guard or Exxon. It is not just the captain that acted irresponsibly, so did all parties concerned. This is described in one part of the book. The second part of the book describes the impact of the oil spill and especially of the clean up on the communities affected. Each of the communities split in the middle. Half of the members took the position of trying to squeeze as much money out of Exxon as possible whilst the other half did not want to have anything to do with Exxon. Exxon did not succeed in engaging the communities in a positive way. The third part describes the nature in Alaska. These descriptions are wonderful and make you want to go there. These three parts are interwoven. The advantage is that the reader gets a three dimensional understanding of what happened: the responsibility for the disaster and the clean up, the impact on different members of the community and the impact on nature. The author places the ultimate responsibility on the consumer. He writes, " the American population prefers to live in a fog and is willing to accept almost anything in return for the opportunity to keep its gas tanks topped up" (with cheap gas). The combination of corporations maximising short-term profits and consumers closing their eyes to the consequences of their behaviour makes one worried. There must be a better way.
Winn
John Keeble, whose writing focuses on the issues facing the American Northwest, paints a memorable picture of the Exxon Valdez oilspill and its aftermath. Asked by the Greenwich Village Voice to write an article on the spill, he travels to Alaska and observes first-hand the efforts made to restore the land and the wildlife. However, the more he observes the more he is haunted by two observations: 1) that the size of the oil companies, and the entangled relationship between the companies and the government, is enormously greater than we have suspected, and 2) that the vast amounts of money poured into the clean-up effort causes many to view that money as their goal. His investigations into the clean-up follow a theme he develops in his other works: that the intrusion of a company or government upon the land inevitably causes exploitation; and those who live in that land must invariably suffer the consequences. Torn between the desires to make money, to clear the oil, and to downplay the scope of the incident, the people involved with clean-up waste a good deal of their effort. The more damage Keeble assesses, the more in tune he becomes with the suffering of the people and animals truly hurt, and ultimately, the reader, too, feels the chill that shakes the author at each new discovery.
Gralinda
Out of the Channel should be required reading for anyone who thinks environmentally ... not just environmentalists, but students, political and economic theorists, and most of all, writers. I had the good fortune to learn a great deal about writing from John Keeble, and reading his book is an education all by itself. As a rigorous study of the physical and human impact of the Exxon Valdez disaster, Out of the Channel is a comprehensive anatomy, a text that does not shirk any of the heavy load its vast subject demands. Without taking the easy route of righteous anger, Keeble explores every nuance of the oil spill, and he follows that tenacious blot of Prudhoe Bay crude as it seeps out of the tangible world and into the minds and spirits of the permanent and temporary inhabitants of Prince William Sound. This tenth anniversary edition, with the expanded coverage allowed by the perspective of time, is a gift that should not be overlooked.