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Download Blowout in the Gulf: The BP Oil Spill Disaster and the Future of Energy in America (The MIT Press) ePub

by Robert Gramling,William R. Freudenburg

Download Blowout in the Gulf: The BP Oil Spill Disaster and the Future of Energy in America (The MIT Press) ePub
  • ISBN 0262015838
  • ISBN13 978-0262015837
  • Language English
  • Author Robert Gramling,William R. Freudenburg
  • Publisher The MIT Press; 1st edition (October 18, 2010)
  • Pages 272
  • Formats mbr azw lrf doc
  • Category Engineering
  • Subcategory Engineering
  • Size ePub 1921 kb
  • Size Fb2 1242 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 994

The story of how a chain of failures, missteps, and bad decisions led to America's biggest environmental disaster.

On April 20, 2010, the gigantic drilling rig Deepwater Horizon blew up in the Gulf of Mexico, killing eleven crew members and causing a massive eruption of oil from BP's Macondo well. For months, oil gushed into the Gulf, spreading death and destruction. Americans watched real-time video of the huge column of oil and gas spewing from the obviously failed “blowout preventer.” What was missing, though, was the larger story of this disaster. In Blowout in the Gulf, energy experts William Freudenburg and Robert Gramling explain both the disaster and the decisions that led up to it.

Blowout in the Gulf weaves a fascinating narrative of failures, missteps, and bad decisions, explaining why this oil spill was a disaster waiting to happen―and how making better energy choices will help prevent others like it.


Freudenburg and Gramling put the spill into the perspective of energy dependence, take us gracefully through .

Freudenburg and Gramling put the spill into the perspective of energy dependence, take us gracefully through technical details blurred by the popular press, grasp the local and national politics (offering some political detergents of their own along the way), and give the spill what will likely be its most masterful handling. the 3rd chapter is also somewhat helpful but most of this book is about the oil industry with the added context of the oil spill which is not what I was wanted. If you want a comprehensive report of exactly what happened in the gulf this is not what you want.

In Blowout in the Gulf, energy experts William Freudenburg and Robert Gramling explain both the disaster and the .

In Blowout in the Gulf, energy experts William Freudenburg and Robert Gramling explain both the disaster and the decisions that led up to it. Blowout in the Gulf weaves a fascinating narrative of failures, missteps, and bad decisions, explaining why this oil spill was a disaster waiting to happen-and how making better energy choices will help prevent others like i. Established in 1962, the MIT Press is one of the largest and most distinguished university presses in the world and a leading publisher of books and journals at the intersection of science, technology, art, social science, and design.

Freudenburg, William R. Publication date. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Prologue: The deep-water horror zone - A question for our time - The Macondo mess - Stored sunlight and its risks - Colonel of an industry? - - Barons and barrels - Off the edge in all directions - "Energy independence" - To know us is to love us - Cleaning up? - - Today and tomorrow. Print version record. Gramling, Robert, 1943-.

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William R. Freudenburg. On April 20, 2010, the gigantic drilling rig Deepwater Horizon blew up in the Gulf of Mexico, killing eleven crew members and causing a massive eruption of oil from BP's Macondo well

William R. On April 20, 2010, the gigantic drilling rig Deepwater Horizon blew up in the Gulf of Mexico, killing eleven crew members and causing a massive eruption of oil from BP's Macondo well. For months, oil gushed into the Gulf, spreading death and destruction. Americans watched real-time video of the huge column of oil and gas spewing from the obviously failed "blowout preventer. What was missing, though, was the larger story of this disaster. In Blowout in the Gulf, energy experts William Freudenburg and Robert Gramling explain both the disaster and the decisions that led up to it.

Blowout in the Gulf book. What was missing, though, was the larger story of this disaster

Blowout in the Gulf book. .

Purpose – The recent oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico as well as a multitude of other corporate scandals repeatedly . The 2010 British Petroleum (BP) Deepwater Horizon oil spill highlighted long-standing questions about energy exploration and its social and environmental implications.

Purpose – The recent oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico as well as a multitude of other corporate scandals repeatedly draw attention to the importance of good corporate governance. This paper seeks to explain the possible reasons for violations of principles of good corporate governance in corporate practice. Sociologists studying environmental disasters have documented the social impacts resulting from these events and dissatisfaction with government and industry responses.

William Freudenburg and Robert Gramling,MIT Press,Cambridge, MA,2010 . In Blowout in the Gulf, energy experts William Freudenburg an.

William Freudenburg and Robert Gramling,MIT Press,Cambridge, MA,2010,US$ 1. 5,262 p. ISBN 9780262015837. On April 20, 2010, the gigantic drilling rig Deepwater Horizon blew up in the Gulf of Mexico, killing 11-crew members and causing a massive eruption of oil from BP’s Macondo well. Americans watched real-time video of the huge column of oil and gas spewing from the obviously failed blowout preventer. Freudenberg and Robert Gramling, Blowout in the Gulf: The BP Oil Spill Disaster and the Future of Energy in America, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2011, 240 pp. Peter Lehner (with Bob Deans). Peter Lehner (with Bob Deans), In Deep Water: The Anatomy of a Disaster, the Fate of the Gulf, and How to End Our Oil Addiction, OR Books, New York, 2010, 173 pp. The April 20, 2010 Deepwater Horizon/BP alliburton/Minerals Management Service disaster will no doubt be discussed, analyzed, written about, and litigated for many years to come.

Talk about Blowout in the Gulf: The BP Oil Spill Disaster and the Future of Energy in America (The MIT Press)


Doath
Blowout in the Gulf is a good read. The academic authors address the impact of BP's blowout and link it to a number of chapters about the environmental tragedy, social impacts, politics, and energy independence. Their book became a good resource as I wrote my book about the cause of the disaster . . . The Simple Truth: BP's Macondo Blowout
Thorgahuginn
This is a great book (although I agree the Kindle version is pretty frustrating as the charts don't show up). Rather than just stating "Oil Bad!", the authors do a great job of explaining the history of oil drilling in general and deep water drilling in particular. I was also surprised to hear how many years it has been since the United States was even marginally "energy independent". This book presents an excellent wake-up call for the rest of us! Highly recommended, but get the print version
Xlisiahal
The first 2 chapters in this book are about the BP oil spill...the 3rd chapter is also somewhat helpful but most of this book is about the oil industry with the added context of the oil spill which is not what I was wanted. If you want a comprehensive report of exactly what happened in the gulf this is not what you want. You want the final report at oilspillcommission.gov. Granted it's fairly long but it includes a lot of good information and is totally free.
happy light
as advertised
Ndlaitha
Do not get a Kindle version of this book, at least until Amazon figures out how to convert figures and charts. Most of the "figures" in the book are just black boxes.
Rko
I was on shore when I saw the Deepwater Horizon burning on CNN. I mentioned that the ocean was the only thing that was going to put that fire out, which it did about 4 hours later. I've been waiting to read a book-length exposition of the chain of human failures leading to what I knew then was going to be an area problem for twenty years. This is not the book.
This is a good collection, all in one spot, of the author's collection of 3x5 index cards, loosely organized to show the historical development of the extraction of natural resources for our use here in America, and the failure of responsible management along the way. The truth is that engineering resources have provided an amazing opportunity these past hundred years for people and companies to supply convenience and simultaneously earn mind boggling sums of money, and that opportunity has been largely unrestrained up to now.
I'm still looking for a book that can give us a responsible path forward. I can recommend '$20 per Gallon' in this genre of work, or the biographies of Howard Hughes or Armand Hammer for more background information. If you haven't read through the 'Confessions of an Economic Hitman' series yet, your time and money would be better spent.
As more information on the Deepwater Horizon comes out in various courts, I expect we'll see dramatic changes in practice and oversight.
Dodo
Authors William R. Freudenburg and Robert Gramling are college teachers, and if you have a chance to take their classes, enroll right away. Professors of environmental studies and sociology, respectively, they are very informative, and they base their conclusions on well-reported facts. Their book links US energy policy to oil politics, corporate performance, risk management, and the technological and geological problems that led to the US's largest peacetime offshore oil spill. The professors cover the oil industry's history and the energy debate in a single, tightly packed volume, including significant accidents, their causes and the paltry penalties companies - especially British Petroleum - paid. The book contends that oil companies wield too much power over prices, policy and the environment. getAbstract considers this vivid story about these tremendously powerful, hugely profitable companies to be essential reading.
Here's a letter that I wrote to one of the co-authors, Prof. Robert Gramling, that ought to explain my points:

Dear Prof. Gramling
I was just starting this letter to you when it came to my notice that your co-author passed away last year. My condolences.
In regards to the book you co-authored with Prof. Freudenberg, `Blowout in the Gulf', there is no question in my mind that the universal policy towards the consumption of oil is the equivalent of `sticking our head in the sand'. And that applies to everyone: politicians, oil companies, and the general public.
In making that argument you are right on the money. And that argument has been made before in many other books. I question though the way in which you tried to tie the Macondo disaster to that argument, stating perhaps that failing to temper the oil-dearth-storm is directly tied in with the criminally negligent manner in which BP went about its business.
There is link, albeit tenuous, in that in being pushed further and deeper to dig up the oil by the public thirst for it, the companies are forced to engage in riskier explorations to find the oil in less than convenient locations. But you didn't make that argument. Or if you were trying to make it didn't come out clearly.
Perhaps the point ought to be made the other way around: that `we' the public ought to temper our use of this precious resource thereby not forcing the oil companies to engage in riskier explorations. Conversely speaking, of course, if we continue to guzzle up the oil, than the oil companies who do go on riskier explorations need to take ever greater precautions to avoid the disaster like the one on the Deepwater Horizon.
But the reality is that that is never going to happen. What will happen is that we, the world, will be confronted with an environmental disaster so catastrophic that it will make the Deepwater Horizon seem like a minor incident. That will then push the politicians to take immediate and urgent action to confront the crisis at hand.
Or the other possibility is that the realisation of the dearth of oil will come upon us suddenly, by the countries and companies admitting to the less than stellar supplies underground, forcing prices to $300-$400 bbl. of oil and thereby impose austerity measures a la wartime. And then perhaps all those idiots buying up those large SUVs, sports cars, and other like gas guzzling sedans will suddenly realise that what is sitting in their driveways are nothing more than dead dinosaurs that can't move a single inch without the precious petroleum.
But you didn't make that argument either.
I could go on about the arguments that didn't spawn out of your book, but the general sense is that your arguments are muddled. Let me give you a succinct example. On page 157 you write, `several weeks after the initial capping of the well, found nearly a doubling in the number of oiled birds being rescued each day-except that the fraction of the birds being recovered alive actually went down, from an average of 56% before the capping to just 41% after the capping'.
So the reader can be forgiven for understanding that the capping actually caused more damage, which is antithetical, you would think that once the well was capped things would improve, but you argue, based on the newspaper report, that things got worse.
Yet right in the next sentence you write, `The figures for sea turtles were even worse, with more turtles having been recovered in the few weeks after the capping than several months before'. Huh? So which is it? The fate of the wildlife was better pre- than post-capping?
And this type of muddled writing and arguing points goes on right through the book.
The effort for the most part behind the writing of this book was commendable, but I don't think that the points that you tried to present come across as cogently as you tried at the outset. Least of all in the last chapter, `Today and Tomorrow', no premise or metaphor makes the least bit of sense.
Then there are the half-completed paragraphs that are totally unclear, as on Page 183. You state at the near bottom `Should this estimate be wrong...' what estimate? You didn't give one. All you stated at the beginning of the paragraph was `urgent need to use the time that still remains', how much time? Years, decades, months, days?
This book needs a good rewrite and rethink. Unfortunately your co-author isn't with us any longer, so that might be a little bit of a challenge.
Sincerely,

Eddie Russell