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Download Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis Aboard Mir ePub

by Brian Murray,Bryan Burrough

Download Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis Aboard Mir ePub
  • ISBN 0694521159
  • ISBN13 978-0694521159
  • Language English
  • Author Brian Murray,Bryan Burrough
  • Publisher HarperAudio; Abridged edition (November 25, 1998)
  • Formats azw txt docx doc
  • Category Engineering
  • Subcategory Engineering
  • Size ePub 1353 kb
  • Size Fb2 1447 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 373

The exciting, at times harrowing, U.S.Russian mission aboard the MIR spacecraft details the international successes, and often dangerous mishaps, that shaped the threeyear U.S. involvement in Russia's orbiting space station. Book available.

Enthusiasts who followed the 1997 crises aboard Mir, an orbiting Russian space station, knew of the many mishaps. This book documents the middle of the MIR/NASA joint program. Highly critical of NASA politics and management.

Enthusiasts who followed the 1997 crises aboard Mir, an orbiting Russian space station, knew of the many mishaps. Dragonfly is a timely retelling of what transpired when American astronauts joined the Russians on Mir, as well as their background, training, and personalities.

Start by marking Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis Aboard Mir as Want to Read .

Start by marking Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis Aboard Mir as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In this way, the reader is left to make his, her own judgments on the matter.

Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis Aboard Mir (1998)

Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis Aboard Mir (1998). Public Enemies: America’s Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-34 (2004). The Big Rich: The Rise and Fall of the Greatest Texas Oil Fortunes (2009).

Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis Aboard Mir (. ISBN 0-88730-783-3) is a 1999 book by Bryan Burrough about the Russian Mir space station and the cosmonauts and astronauts who served aboard. The story centres on astronaut Jerry Linenger and the events on the Shuttle and Mir Space Programme in 1997. The Buran Spacecraft designed as an equivalent to the US Space Shuttle. The Energia Rocket, designed to serve as an expendable launch system for the soviet space programme.

Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis Aboard Mir. by Bryan Burrough

Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis Aboard Mir. by Bryan Burrough. In Public Enemies, bestselling author Bryan Burrough strips away the thick layer of myths put out by J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI to tell the full story-for the first time-of the most spectacular crime wave in American history, the two-year battle between. Barbarians at the Gate: The Fall of RJR Nabisco. by Bryan Burrough · John Helyar.

In "Dragonfly", bestselling author Bryan Burrough tells for the first time the incredible true story of how a joint Russian-American crew narrowly survived almost every trauma an astronaut could imagine: fire, power blackouts.

In "Dragonfly", bestselling author Bryan Burrough tells for the first time the incredible true story of how a joint Russian-American crew narrowly survived almost every trauma an astronaut could imagine: fire, power blackouts, chemical leaks, docking failures, nail-biting spacewalks, and constant mechanical breakdowns, all climaxing in a dramatic midspace collision that left everyone on board scrambling for their lives.

Bryan Burrough, coauthor of the bestselling Barbarians at the Gate, has a. .

Can't we just get along?" asked Rodney King amid the . As you become engulfed in the portrayal of the Shuttle-Mir program outlined in this book, you half expect someone to jump up and say exactly the same thing.

ISBN 0-88730-783-3) is a book by Bryan Burrough about the Russian Mir space station and the cosmonauts and .

ISBN 0-88730-783-3) is a book by Bryan Burrough about the Russian Mir space station and the cosmonauts and astronauts who served aboard. Personnel covered in the book. Astronaut Jerry Linenger. Astronaut John Blaha. Astronaut Michael Foale. Cosmonaut Aleksandr Lazutkin. Cosmonaut Vasili Tsibliyev.

Good: A book that has been read, but is in good condition

Good: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear. Return to top. Dragonfly: NASA And The Crisis Aboard Mir by Burrough,.

Bryan Burrough takes us to Star City then to Mir and back, almost as witnesses of the crisis aboard the Russian space station.

Dragonfly is the gripping story of seven American astronauts and their missions to the dangerously decaying Mir space station from March 1995 to June 1998. Bryan Burrough takes us to Star City then to Mir and back, almost as witnesses of the crisis aboard the Russian space station.

Talk about Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis Aboard Mir


GWEZJ
What a fascinating book! You learn a lot of behind the scenes shenanigans in the space program. Post Challenger NASA had no real purpose. The agency was adrift and needed to justify spending billions of tax dollars on this super expensive space shuttle. Sure, the Hubble telescope launch and fix was important, but other than that, what? Hey! why don't we collaborate with the Russian's and send our astronauts aboard MIR. This could be sort of a test to see how well things could be for the ISS. What could go wrong? Plenty.

Very few astronauts wanted to volunteer for this crazy unknown. The few that did were treated like castaways by NASA. Shipped over to Star City, Russia and mostly abandoned, the astronauts began to suffer all forms of mental breakdowns and neurosis. Once aboard MIR, when the space hoopty suffered failure after failure, their mental issues were exacerbated. The MIR was constantly leaking coolant and had numerous power failures. I can't imagine what kind of mold and other toxic garbage was growing in there. A fire almost killed two cosmonauts and one astronaut. A poorly planned docking of Progress causes a decompression that could have killed two cosmonauts and one astronaut. The Russians literally fly by the seat of their pants. It's all about winging it and this puts unbelievable stress on the cosmonauts.

There are a lot of interesting characters that emerge in this book. The astronauts seem maniacally obsessed to get up in space. They're treated like garbage and though many of them have advanced degrees and are smart as hell they continue staying at a place that treats them as expendable. Out of all of the astronauts, Shannon Lucid comes out smelling like a rose. Even though she had an emotional breakdown from being abandoned by NASA in Star City she bucked up and proved her mettle up in the space station. Thagaard, Dunbar, Blaha, Linenger, come across as whiners. I will say that for all the whining Jerry Linenger did he was the only astronaut to have the stones to tell everybody how unsafe MIR is. Frank Culbertson comes across as a typical butt covering NASA yes man, sucking up to George Abbey, and mismanaging the Phase One program every step of the way. In typical NASA fashion, he was promoted to head the ISS program. Haha! What Judy Resnik saw in this guy I'll never know. Sticktime, I'm assuming.

Of course, George Abbey is featured as a Machiavellian character who sends shudders of fear through the astronaut office. The astronauts who sucked up to Abbey are rewarded with plenty of flight assignments. It was well known that Abby had a bias against Air Force pilots and favored Navy pilots. No astronaut wants to be stuck in astronaut purgatory. So consequently, astronauts were doing their best to get into the good graces of Abbey. I found this to be truly pathetic. This management style is awful, and it created turmoil and antagonism in the astronaut ranks.

All in all, this is a great read. It will make you rethink a lot of your assumptions about NASA and the astronaut corps. I also wonder how much we are being kept in the dark about what really goes on up on the ISS. It's amazing what you'll see when NASA's curtain is pulled back and you witness what goes on behind closed doors.
Jonariara
As a Baby Boomer who followed NASA from its very inception, this book is both fascinating and disheartening. I rate it high because it is thorough, well-written, and even-handed in its presentation. The appalling part is finding out just how much of The Wrong Stuff had gotten into both countries' space programs. Burrough clearly describes the extent to which neither side trusted each other, how often money & politics took precidence over safety & common sense, and the painful situation the cosmonauts & astronauts found themselves in. This is a study in bureaucratic incompetance, irresponsibility, and indifference. The author pulls no punches, and doesn't hesitate to criticize either side of a dispute.

The Russians managers cared much more about getting U.S. money than safety, and about keeping their iron-fisted control over the cosmonauts. The cosmonauts, being paid by their performance, were afraid of making any mistakes, so wouldn't tell the astronauts how anything worked, but wouldn't do anything themselves without permission from the ground. When things did go wrong, the ground controllers would pretend nothing had happened, keeping the Americans in the dark, and later the managers and cosmonauts would blame each other.

NASA managers only seemed to care about keeping Congressional money flowing, maintaining their own power positions, and keeping the Russians from bailing on the ISS program. They couldn't get any experienced astronauts or competent managers to volunteer for this train wreck of a program. Nobody wanted to rock the boat, so looked the other way about proper training and safety. The astronauts that did complain were ignored, and all of them lived in fear of displeasing the one NASA guy who decided who would get to fly shuttle missions, and who wouldn't.

One of the most startling revelations is that this whole ill-conceived program came about only because President George H.W. Bush needed a poll boost in election year 1992, and wanted a impressive sounding announcement to come out of an otherwise lackluster summit meeting with Boris Yeltsin. Ironically, the Clinton adminstration inherited this turkey and also played along, but the bottom line was: neither countries' space programs wanted to have to try to work with each other, nor did the crews. Not surprisingly, this misbegotten program "ran as smoothly as a pig on stilts", as the results on-orbit painfully demonstrated.

Nevertheless, this is an eye-opening, well-written, exciting book that you will enjoy if spaceflight interests you. It must, however, make Chris Kraft and Gene Kranz either want to chew nails or cry.
Butius
Really good story. I know and have occasionally spoken with one of the astronauts in this book. It was he who mentioned the book and got my interest piqued. It is surprising the amount of politics involved in that whole debacle. It was great to see the human side of the space program and get a glimpse into the way that the Russians approach obstacles v. the way the Americans do. It had great descriptions of the several gripping and life threatening events that occurred above in MIR. It makes me wonder why we would have pursued the joint venture with the on the ISS.
Chuynopana
Good read, and very intriguing. An insiders view of how the NASA and Russian space programs waded through the troubles of putting a joint mission together. I loved the way the author made me feel there when describing the station and it's daily life. Also interesting was how the personalities of all involved created problems. I found it captivating how one of the three personalities can cause issues, but that's to be expected when you live in an area the size of a garage with no real way of getting away from your other occupants. This was never mentioned in the media coverage.

My only complaint would be that the author didn't stick to chronological order with the missions, but some of that can be explained away by wanting to get the "good" parts up front to hold the readers interest. I still would recommend this one to any fan of space, NASA.