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Download Banewreaker: Volume I of The Sundering ePub

by Jacqueline Carey

Download Banewreaker: Volume I of The Sundering ePub
  • ISBN 0765305216
  • ISBN13 978-0765305213
  • Language English
  • Author Jacqueline Carey
  • Publisher Tor Books; 1st edition (November 1, 2004)
  • Pages 432
  • Formats lrf lit docx lrf
  • Category Fantasy
  • Subcategory Fantasy
  • Size ePub 1329 kb
  • Size Fb2 1194 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 176

Following the triumphant success of her Kushiel series (Kushiel's Dart, Kushiel's Chosen, Kushiel's Avatar), Jacqueline Carey now turns her hand to another startling fable, an epic tale of gods waging war in their bid to control an entire universe and the mortals they use as chess pieces in a most deadly game.Once, the Seven Shapers dwelled in accord. First-born among them was Haomane, Lord-of-Thought and with his brother and sister gods, the Seven drew upon of the power of the Souma, claimed a race of beings for their own and began Shaping the world to their will. But Haomane saw the ways of this new world and was displeased. For in his younger brother Satoris, once called the Sower, Haomane thought too prideful and in his gift, the quickening of the flesh too freely to the races...and to that of Man in particular. Haomane asked Satoris to withdraw his Gift from Men but he refused. And so began the Shapers' War. Eons have passed. The war that ensued Sundered the very world. Haomane and his siblings lay to one end of a vast ocean unable to touch their creations, Satoris and the races of the world on the other. Satoris has been broken and left adrift among the peoples of the world and is reviled, with most of the races believing that it was he alone who caused the rift and depriving them of the balm of the Seven. He sits in Darkhaven, controlling his own dominion--seeking not victory but neither vengeance.But still Haomane is not content. Through Haomane's whispers in the minds and hearts of the races of the world come a prophecy that if Satoris were defeated, the world could be made whole and all would bask in the light of the Souma again. And the few who stay by Satoris are viewed as the ultimate evil. And so the races come together to defeat Satoris, a being who helped engender them all but who is caught in his elder brother's warp.Strong storytelling with evocative, compelling, and unforgettable characters, Banewrecker ultimately asks the question: If all that is considered good considers you evil, are you?

Jacqueline Carey is the author of the bestselling Kushiel trilogy (Kushiel's Dart, Kushiel's Chosen, and Kushiel's Avatar) and her epic fantasy duology, The Sundering (Banewreaker and Godslayer).

Jacqueline Carey is the author of the bestselling Kushiel trilogy (Kushiel's Dart, Kushiel's Chosen, and Kushiel's Avatar) and her epic fantasy duology, The Sundering (Banewreaker and Godslayer). Start reading Banewreaker: Volume I of The Sundering on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App. Her books have been listed on many booksellers' top ten fantasy books lists. Always an avid reader, Carey began writing fiction as a hobby in high school.

The Sundering was split into two books, Banewreaker and Godslayer, because it was getting too bi. The Sundering is basically Jacqueline Carey's retelling of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, but from the perspective of what we think of as "the bad guys".

The Sundering was split into two books, Banewreaker and Godslayer, because it was getting too big. Together they total around 880 pages in mass market paperback, which normally isn't a big problem. Anyway, it's happened before and it's not a huge problem.

Электронная книга "Banewreaker: Volume I of The Sundering", Jacqueline Carey. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Banewreaker: Volume I of The Sundering" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

by Jacqueline Carey (Author), Antony Ferguson (Narrator). I have highlighted SO MUCH of this book. The other aspect I found redeeming, Jacqueline Carey wrote this and her poetic nature is found throughout. Carey really outdid herself this time with fantastic lines packed with wisdom, uncommon intellect, and actions, thoughts, and environment effects that I would never have thought of in my own writing. You can feel the beauty of the forest, the devastating thirst of the desert.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Banewreaker: Volume I of The Sundering. Following the triumphant success of her Kushiel series (Kushiel's Dart, Kushiel's Chosen, Kushiel's Avatar), Jacqueline Carey now turns her hand to another startling fable, an epic tale of gods waging war in their bid to control an entire universe and the mortals they use as chess pieces in a most deadly game. Once, the Seven Shapers dwelled in accord.

The Sundering is a series of two fantasy novels by Jacqueline Carey made up of Banewreaker, and Godslayer. The books portray a conflict between light and dark, with many of the common conventions of fantasy fiction. The world and many of the characters of the novels are similar to those found in J. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, as Carey presents a similar story as a tragedy told from the "dark" side's perspective

This is a two-in-one volume with both of Jacqueline Carey's top sellers Banewreaker and Godslayer. Inside jacket: with her successful Kushiel series, Jacqueline Carey proved herself a force to be reckoned with in the fantasy field. Fathered by an incubus, raised by a mor. Poison Fruit (Agent of Hel, #3).

Tor books by jacqueline carey

Tor books by jacqueline carey. Praise for jacqueline carey. The Six Shapers were islanded, on that island later called Torath, and the power of the Souma was broken; but Satoris was cast out on the far side of the Sundering Sea, bereft and wounded. The dragons abandoned him, having paid too high a toll for his friendship. This Haomane saw, and the Lord-of-Thought drew upon the might of the shattered Souma.

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Talk about Banewreaker: Volume I of The Sundering


ℓo√ﻉ
This is probably one of the best books I've ever read. I have highlighted SO MUCH of this book. Carey really outdid herself this time with fantastic lines packed with wisdom, uncommon intellect, and actions, thoughts, and environment effects that I would never have thought of in my own writing. Take the very beginning of the novel for instance: Tanaros's unbuckling his helm to find sweaty helmet hair, his scabbard snagging on the carpet as he takes it off, his sword's hilt digging into his side when he bends over, and Aracus showing up suddenly to meet Cerelinde, smelling of horse, leather, and nighttime air. The only complaint I could possibly have is that the character's features and the landscape and buildings are not thoroughly described so I am not sure how to imagine them, but when it comes to the characters' action, the sequence of events, the intricacy of the world and the plot, Carey does not fail to impress! I am a high fantasy series writer myself and I am highlighting and analyzing her book not just for fun but also because there is so much talent to be observed and gained from her writing. If you are not familiar with her Kushiel series, Namaah series, or Hel's Agent series, I would also highly recommend you acquaint yourself with them at the soonest opportunity!
Tall
This review applies to both Banewreaker and it's sequel, Godslayer. The series can be read at three different levels and works quite well on any of them.

First, it is an entertaining piece of epic fantasy, written from the perspective of the nominal villains. The central character is an anti-hero somewhat in the mode of Michael Moorcock's classic Elric. The writing is strong and the action is compelling.

On its second level, the series is a hilarious poke in Tolkein's eye. While I have no access to Ms. Carey's thinking, it's completely clear to me that the novels contain strong elements of parody, although they are written in a completely serious tone. While not borrowing completely literally from the Lord of the Rings, the choice of characters, themes and settings is not coincidental. And if any doubt remained, Carey actually places some of Tolkein's most easily identifiable quotes ("How has it come to this?") in the mouths of characters on the opposite side.

But on its third level, this novel tackles moral issues that have vexed philosophers and theologians. Satoris, the Sunderer, is a Satanic character drawn from Milton's Paradise Lost (quite explicitly - Carey quotes Milton). But this is also a view of the Tempter as Prometheus, bringing an essential gift to the world. At the same time, Carey raises one of the fundamental questions that underlies Kierkegaard's "Fear and Trembling" - why is it a moral necessity to obey the Most High? Satoris is evil because of his disobedience to Haomane, first among the Shapers - but it is never clear why Haomane must be unquestioningly obeyed. The Ellyon (obviously elves in the Tolkein mold) live to worship Haomane in the same way that Christian doctrine describes the Seraphim perpetually worshipping God - but seem to be almost entirely lacking in free will. Indeed, even accepting the concept that Haomane is infinitely good, Satoris is still necessary to the existence of free will - also a concept explicitly acknowledged in the series. (I think it was Borges who argued that the only two relevant characters in the New Testament were Jesus and Judas - it's the same sort of idea.)

The effortless functioning of the series on all three levels ranks Carey's work right up with Gene Wolfe in the pantheon of "important" fantasy, in my opinion. Highly recommended.
Malodor
Epic, but not my cup of tea. If you liked LOTRs this might strike yours. But I don't like stories of war even if magic and dragons do reside therein.

As opposed to most of the Kushiel's Dart series, this book is very male heavy and the women were weaklings or brought to that state by the loss of their particular magic.

The beginning, more like the first half of the book was difficult to read. It was the set up of the characters and the planet. I think it would have been better to have a list of characters at the beginning or end of the book and set off running with the actual stories. My husband owns the actual book and I couldn't get into it. But with my Kindle set on text to speech, fastest, I was able to get through the whole book!

As my three stars predicts, there was redeeming features. One of those was the point of view. This book set up the main characters, the "bad guys" to prove them not so bad. Then we take a look at the "beautiful people" and find them carriers of ugly. That made this worth reading.

The other aspect I found redeeming, Jacqueline Carey wrote this and her poetic nature is found throughout. You can feel the beauty of the forest, the devastating thirst of the desert.

It is worth the read, it just isn't one of my favorites. We'll see how I feel about it when I get around to reading volume two, Godslayer.
Abuseyourdna
I love Carey's books, but Banewrecker and Godslayer didn't seem at all like her writing until the last half of Godslayer. The story was fantastic; relatively well developed characters you care about and a dynamic plot, but they lack the richness of detail in the Kushiel/Naamah novels. There was no way to get a mental image of where places were in relation to each other or even what the different races/characters looked like. The characters themselves had a lot more potential for depth and they felt flat and forced compared to her other books.

I recommend them for reading, but whatever you do, do not spend any money on the Kindle versions. No punctuation at all on most pages, awkward or misplaced page and paragraph breaks, and repetitive word use. There was absolutely no editing or quality control involved in transcribing these volumes for e-book release, and while I thought for a while that I could just glaze past the errors for the story's sake, I was very wrong. They're glaring and obvious and really took away from the immersion and enjoyment of the story.