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Download Shadows of Doom by Dennis L. McKiernan (Iron Tower Trilogy Series, Book 2) by Books In Motion.com ePub

by Read by Cameron Beierle,Dennis L. McKiernan

Download Shadows of Doom by Dennis L. McKiernan (Iron Tower Trilogy Series, Book 2) by Books In Motion.com ePub
  • ISBN 1605485209
  • ISBN13 978-1605485201
  • Language English
  • Author Read by Cameron Beierle,Dennis L. McKiernan
  • Publisher Books In Motion; Iron Tower Trilogy edition (September 15, 2009)
  • Formats lrf mbr azw rtf
  • Category Fantasy
  • Subcategory Fantasy
  • Size ePub 1183 kb
  • Size Fb2 1893 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 217

The winter had begun. At Gunnaring Gap, the valiant Riders of Valon began their charge. And though Challerain Keep lay in ruins and butchery had led to the capture of Princess Laurelin, heroes strode forth from the ranks of Men, Elves, Warrows and Dwarves to turn the tide of doom. And across the land ruled by unnatural dark, freedom flickered and burst into flame...

99 shipping This is book 1 in the Iron Tower Trilogy

Shadows of Doom by Dennis L. McKiernan (Iron Tower Trilogy Series, Book 2) by Books In Motion. Ships from and sold by FOLSpokane. This is book 1 in the Iron Tower Trilogy. I know there are a lot of naysayers with this series because it is very derivative of The Lord of the Rings and as a result, it is constantly being compared it's literary prowess. Here is what I enjoyed about this series and why i would recommend it.

Shadows of Doom book. The winter had begun. The length is perfect - something you can finish in a relatively short amount of time when compared to something like A Song of Fire & Ice by George .

Narrated by Cameron Beierle. by Dennis L. McKiernan. At Gunnaring Gap, the Riders of Valon began their charge. Rate it . You Rated it .

Find the complete Iron Tower Trilogy book series by Dennis L. Great deals on one book or all books in the series. The Darkest Day. Dennis L.

Hardcover Paperback Kindle. McKiernan is a bestselling American author famously known for his high fantasy series, The Iron Tower. The authors other genres include horror fiction, science fiction crime fiction, and high fantasy set in different fictional worlds. Dennis was born and raised in Moberly, Missouri. The second book, Shadows of Doom, opens up with an extended narration of the previous novel, with Laurelin’s abduction by the Modru’s forces.

Written by Dennis L. McKiernan, narrated by Cameron Beierle. Picked these up for a recent road trip. The Iron Tower Trilogy, Book 2. By: Dennis L. Narrated by: Cameron Beierle. Length: 10 hrs and 28 mins.

Dennis Lester McKiernan (born April 4, 1932) is an American writer best known for his high fantasy The Iron Tower. His genres include high fantasy (set in various fictitious worlds), science fiction, horror fiction, and crime fiction

Dennis Lester McKiernan (born April 4, 1932) is an American writer best known for his high fantasy The Iron Tower. His genres include high fantasy (set in various fictitious worlds), science fiction, horror fiction, and crime fiction. His primary setting, Mithgar, was originally used to re-tell the plot points of J R R Tolkien's Middle Earth books, although the characters usually have different names.

Find nearly any book by Dennis L. McKiernan (page 2). Get the best deal . Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Find all books by 'Dennis L. McKiernan' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Dennis L. McKiernan'. The Darkest Day (Iron Tower Trilogy) (Book 3). Shadows of Doom (Iron Tower Trilogy): ISBN 9780451155658 (978-0-451-15565-8) Softcover, Roc, 1987. Voyage of the Fox Rider (Mithgar).

September 1987 : USA Mass Market Paperback.

Talk about Shadows of Doom by Dennis L. McKiernan (Iron Tower Trilogy Series, Book 2) by Books In Motion.com


Weernis
This is book 2 in the Iron Tower Trilogy. I know there are a lot of naysayers with this series because it is very derivative of The Lord of the Rings and as a result, it is constantly being compared it's literary prowess. Here is what I enjoyed about this series and why i would recommend it. First, the plot very closely mirrors Lord of the Rings which you should know before reading. It contains the same races as well. The key difference is that the hobbit-like race is not completely and utterly worthless as they are in Tolkien's books. They actually serve a legitimate role which i find to be much more enjoyable than whiny counterparts. Second, McKiernan is pretty straight forward and to the point in his writing. It's not cluttered with endless descriptions that can sometimes slow the story line to a crawl. Don't get me wrong here. I love Tolkien but he can be a bit long winded at times. If you are looking for good classic fantasy, this is your series.
Envias
I have always wondered why people loved J.R.R.Tolkien's stories so much. I read them when I was 13 yrs old. And I did like them. But there was always something wrong with them that I just could not except. And that thing was in my opinion a flaw that wrecked the whole story. What is that flaw? The fact that the Hobbits were totally worthless and weak. Evil taking over their land? They all rush out to DEBATE endlessly over what to do about it. Talk and whine and piss and moan. That was all the Hobbits did the whole story. They were carried through the whole story by the other characters. McKiernan on the other hand created the hobbits that I wanted to read about. Fearlessly brave with huge backbones and full of grit and determination. And McKiernans stories all flow so easily along. That you don't have to fight your way throw them. Unlike JJRT'S books.
Friert
great trilogy. my fiance loves these books. he reads maybe 2 books a week and he really enjoyed these. happy to add them to the library!
Hugighma
Very good, not very many skips, arrived when promised. I now have the entire series. Enjoyed having this, and will recommend.
Hatе&love
Still a difficult read akin to Tolkien, but very enjoyable. There were some big moments that were impossible to put down and continue to elevate Tuck and his comrades to the level of legends. That said, they are backed into one heck of a corner. I'm excited to see how the conclusion plays out.
breakingthesystem
The eyes of the Warrows come in various shades, some have specutlated they are in some way related to the giants that once roamed the world. Whatever the truth, they give them a decided edge in the demondark. They are even able to outsee the elves within its murky darkness.

The story conitues to progress as the Warrows from behind the thornwall are taken from one extreme to another.

AS I stated in my earlier review of book one, it is like Lord of the Rings in many ways. Still, it is enjoyable if you but give it a chance.
Agagamand
Another fine offering from McKiernan. Please ignore the Tolkien fanboys. As a guy that has been reading fantasy books for over half my life (I'm 32), McKiernan stands well above the most other authors in the genre. He isn't a Martin/Erikson/Tolikien quality, but he smokes the Jordans and Goodkinds.

The only complaints I've noticed about his works are that they mirror Tolkien (well duh this is a known fact, if you don't like it don't read it) and that he isn't suitable for younger readers since he tends to not be a lite and easy read.
McKiernan in his foreword tells us that he is paying homage to Tolkien's Lord of the Rings. Homage? Hmm. According to the American Heritage® Dictionary "homage" is defined as: "Special honor or respect shown or expressed publicly." I fail to see the "honor" to Tolkien in McKiernan's "The Iron Tower" trilogy. While it is true it is said that imitation is the highest form of flattery, McKiernan's books are less like flattery and more like regurgitation. Don't get me wrong, I don't mind if a writer is heavily inspired by the work of another. Even Tolkien himself drew much of his thematic elements and ideas from other ancient and mythic sources (Beowulf for example), but he reconstituted those ideas in such a way that they seemed fresh; not copied or reprinted. He was reinventing not simply rewriting.

Unfortunately, such is not the case with McKiernan's work. His ideas are directly lifted from the pages of "The Lord of the Rings" without any attempt at originality.

In McKiernan's story, a Warrow (Hobbit) named Tuck Underbank (Frodo) embarks on a quest to defeat an ultimate evil, Mordu (Sauron) who dwells in the evil land of Gron (Mordor). Along the way he encounters a dwarf called Brega (Gimli), an elf named Gildor(Legolas), a human warrior (Aragorn), etc, etc, etc...The Tolkien plagiarism's go on and on.

He even includes a scene where some of the main characters have to pass through an abandoned Dwarf city called Kraggen-Cor. The city is abandoned because some terrible monster (Ghath) drove all of the dwarfs out long ago. The only way into the subterranean city is through some magical doors that they have some difficulty getting open. While waiting at the doors, a monstrous squid/octopus-like creature attacks them. And yes, there is even a battle with the Ghath in the dwarfin city on a narrow bridge over a bottomless cavern.

I have a one hundred page rule when it comes to books; if the book can't engross me, can't keep my interest by the hundredth page I give it up. In this case, morbid curiosity kept me reading these books; like a horrible car accident, I couldn't tear my eyes away. Page after page I kept telling myself "it can't get any worse" and page after page I was proved wrong.

As bad as the plagiarism is, the writing is even worse.

The epic scope of Tolkien's story is GONE. Tolkien's writing was marked by mystery, grandeur and a poignant sense of loss and realism. All of this is missing from McKiernan's work. The characters in "The Lord of the Rings" (and the "Hobbit" for that matter) were three-dimensional; they seemed almost to have stepped out of the history books and not a novel. Tolkien made us care about his characters and what happened to them. McKiernan is incapable of doing this with the cardboard cutouts that populate his world. For example, Tuck Underbank is written to be a tragic/heroic figure and spends A LOT of time crying and sobbing about this or that. The narrative, time and time again, tries to make us feel sorry for him. After a while, I just started rolling my eyes and hoping someone would put him out of his misery. Throughout the story the dialogue is stilted, completely unnatural and pathetic. This may be one of the only times in history where a story would have been improved if none of the characters spoke.

Rather than "honoring" Tolkien with "The Iron Tower" trilogy, McKiernan dishonors the great writer. For those looking for a well written, enriching story in the style of Tolkien or just a good epic fantasy: Look elsewhere.