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Download Pirates of the Universe ePub

by Terry Bisson

Download Pirates of the Universe ePub
  • ISBN 0312862954
  • ISBN13 978-0312862954
  • Language English
  • Author Terry Bisson
  • Publisher Tor Books; 1st Printing edition (March 15, 1997)
  • Pages 288
  • Formats lrf lrf txt lit
  • Category Fantasy
  • Subcategory Science Fiction
  • Size ePub 1772 kb
  • Size Fb2 1320 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 426

In the shabby, war-torn, depleted Earth of the twenty-first century, Gunther Glenn wants to live in the utopian theme park "Pirates of the Universe." He only needs one more mission as a Space ranger--hunting the enigmatic Peteys, 1200-kilometer voids in space whose "skins" can be harvested and processed into a substance more valuable than gold--to get his chance. But the arrival of a mysterious package and the disappearance of another Ranger ship into the Petey void sends Gun on a mission through the bureaucratic maze of the mother corporation, the virtual-reality maze of the Dogg, and the Escher-like multidimensional maze of the Tangle for the key to his future.

But this little Kindle book is only 3 bucks, and includes 5 other all-dialogue shorts (a sort of specialty of mine). The space whaling saga Pirates of the Universe is about a Disney-Windows employee trying to hold onto his perks

But this little Kindle book is only 3 bucks, and includes 5 other all-dialogue shorts (a sort of specialty of mine). So improve your life and mine. The space whaling saga Pirates of the Universe is about a Disney-Windows employee trying to hold onto his perks. The Pick-Up Artist is about a guy who makes room for new art by destroying the old. In Voyage to the Red Planet, the first trip to Mars is produced by Hollywood.

I met Terry Bisson through "Bears discover fire", which is awesome and highly recommended. However Pirates of the Universe is a Bisson which you should skip

I met Terry Bisson through "Bears discover fire", which is awesome and highly recommended. However Pirates of the Universe is a Bisson which you should skip. As a woman, and an avid reader of old and new sci-fi, I have a thick skin when it comes to portrayal of women - if you tell a fascinating story, if the story can transcend time, then I'll forgive you for not having any real women in it. However "Pirates of Universe" was published in 1997, not 1947, and there's really no excuse for marginalization of his women characters

Terry Ballantine Bisson (born February 12, 1942) is an American science fiction and fantasy author.

Terry Ballantine Bisson (born February 12, 1942) is an American science fiction and fantasy author. He is best known for his short stories, including "Bears Discover Fire", which won the Hugo Award and the Nebula Award, and "They're Made Out of Meat". Bisson was born in Madisonville, Kentucky, and raised in Owensboro, Kentucky. While a student at Grinnell College (Iowa) in 1961, Bisson was one of a group of twelve students who traveled to Washington, .

Terry Bisson's novel Pirates of the Universe didn't hold my attention (and I read books on philosophy and number theory by choice). Bisson created a frenetic world, lavishly described; however, the whole is substantively less than the sum of the parts. I didn't have the sense that Bisson actually followed his various ideas all the way through the world-building process: anyone can predict the car, only a visionary can predict the traffic jam or suburban sprawl

Pirates of the Universe. Pirates of the Universe.

Pirates of the Universe. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Uploaded by admin-venus-jones on March 10, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Terry Bisson, 34 Items, 9 Books, 25 Articles. Pirates of the Universe (1996). River of Dust by Alexander Jablokov. Pirates of the Universe by Terry Bisson. Darwin: A Life in Science by Michael White and John Gribbin. World-Building by Stephen L. Gillett.

A New York Times Notable Book for 1996. It is the Bissons of the field. You're getting the VIP treatment! With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

Terry Bisson Terry Bisson. Bears Discover Fire, " the title story in this eagerly awaited collection, is one of the most acclaimed science fiction stories of the Nineties.

Bears Discover Fire, " the title story in this eagerly awaited collection, is one of the most acclaimed science fiction stories of the Nineties. Particularly delightful, " raved The Christian Science Monitor, while Newsday called it "the finest story in the Dozois volume.

One of the premiere writers of short fiction in the field, his stories have won two Nebulas, a Hugo, and two Locus Awards. Genres: Science Fiction, Young Adult Fantasy. Wilson Wu and Irving 1. The Hole in the Hole (1994) 2. The Edge of the Universe (1996). Saint Leibowitz (with Walter M Miller) 2. Saint Leibowitz and the Wild Horse Woman (1995). Nascar Pole Position (as by T B Calhoun) 1. Rolling Thunder (1998) 2. In the Groove (1998) 3. Race Ready (1998) 5. Hammer Down (1999) 7. Full Throttle (1999) Speed Demon (1998) Spinout!

Talk about Pirates of the Universe


Brightfury
It seems every writer of science fiction has to publish at least one novel set in the not-too-distant future, in which the Earth has been largely destroyed by wars or environmental disasters, currently commonplace amenities such as electricity and personal freedom are rare, and the future is just as hopeless as the present. "Pirates of the Universe" is typical of that sub-genre. The main character begins in a position of status that insulates him from the difficulties of his world. His privileges are stripped from him without explanation, and he embarks on a journey to discover unexpected truths about his family, his society, and the universe.
There are positive aspects of this book that set it apart from most other works of its type. The plot is uncommonly complex, and there are a number of unusual, interesting details - it's clear that Bisson has devoted a lot of thought to the world he's created, and it makes for an engaging and stimulating read. But these strengths are marred by the book's essential weakness, which is - not surprisingly - its post-apocalyptic setting and tone. Bisson is often preoccupied by impressing upon his readers the unpleasantness of the book's universe, and this makes the book awkward and unpleasant to read at times.
Overall, "Pirates of the Universe" is an interesting and enjoyable book. The author has some good ideas, and he has the ability to write a plot that strings them together engagingly. However, readers who can't tolerate the preachiness that seems inherent to the genre will probably not want to subject themselves to the dose Bisson metes out.
ALAN
The Washington Post Book World states on the back cover of Pirates of the Universe, "It is the Bissons of the field... upon whom the future of science fiction depends." If this is true, than sci-fi is in a world of trouble. Pirate's plot is intriguing and Bisson's story telling is vaguely reminiscent of the old grand master, Alfred Bester. However, make no mistake, Bisson is no Alfred Bester. There is much more to good sci-fi, indeed, much more to good fiction, than an intriguing plot. It is a writer's responsibility to his readers to build credibility and trust through, among other things, attention to detail, and this is something at which Bisson utterly fails. A good book, like a good movie, should never draw attention to itself through its flaws. In sci-fi, the reader must be willing to suspend his disbelief in concepts of time travel, parallel universes, faster than light travel, etc. But when a writer's poor grammar and inability to construct sound sentences begins to detract from the story, then he is in trouble.
Use of a phrase repetitively can be an effective technique, but Bisson's choice to use the phrase "In the old days..." no less than eight times over a span of one page is not only ineffective but downright annoying. Oldsmobile, Buick and Toyota all find themselves properly noted as proper names in Pirates; yet Chevrolet is conspicuously left with a lowercase `C' throughout the novel, save for one instance. Marlboro (as in cigarettes) appears as a proper name throughout, save for one chapter, when twice the `M' is mysteriously lowercase. Bisson's protagonist, Gunther, "had only hugged his brother once before..." Surely Bisson had intended that Gun had hugged his brother only once before. Small potatoes, perhaps, but together with the host of other inconsistencies and poor choices Bisson makes in relating his tale, it becomes too great an obstacle to overcome. An argument could be made perhaps that Bisson needs a better editor, but ultimately these choices, this attention to detail, must fall on the shoulders of the author.
A 1996 New York Times Notable Book of the Year, one can only wonder what other sci-fi titles might have been Pirates' competition that year. The front cover of Pirates quotes The Washington Post Book World as claiming "Bisson can charm your toes off." Well, this is one reader of Pirates who can still lay claim to a full complement of ten.
Faegal
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I appreciate an author or director who allows the audience to make some sense of their world rather than spelling everything out in black and white. Bisson dips you into the world in a way that seems very natural, never heavy-handed. He's a writer who has some flair...in a subtle, sparse way. Odd combination, I know.
Hmm...hard book to describe...it's uncomfortable in spots, I can't say I'd want to live in this world, it's depressing...and yet I felt oddly bouyant. Its a rare near-future book that seems plausible, but this is one.
I'm not a huge P.K. Dick fan, but this remninded me of the things I like best about him.
Definitely worth a read.
Malojurus
I met Terry Bisson through "Bears discover fire", which is awesome and highly recommended. However Pirates of the Universe is a Bisson which you should skip. As a woman, and an avid reader of old and new sci-fi, I have a thick skin when it comes to portrayal of women -- if you tell a fascinating story, if the story can transcend time, then I'll forgive you for not having any real women in it. However "Pirates of Universe" was published in 1997, not 1947, and there's really no excuse for marginalization of his women characters. Between "virtual reality sex fantasy", "virtual reality psycho listener", "hometown girl with dreams no higher than suburbia", and "virtual reality psycho sex provider to inmates" you have to really wonder why Bisson populated this novel with a full cast of two-dimensional female shadows. One rather hopes it was a failed attempt at irony.
Nikobar
I'm not a big fan of post-apocalypse sci-fi books and this one is pretty typical for the genre. The writing and plot are pretty average and there aren't too many big surprises even though the book is set up as a sort of mystery of what's in the package. We follow the central character Glenn as he goes about trying to deliver the package. Some weird sci-fi stuff happens in the process and sets up the ending.