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Download Jewish Themes in Star Trek ePub

by Rabbi Yonassan Gershom

Download Jewish Themes in Star Trek ePub
  • ISBN 0557048001
  • ISBN13 978-0557048007
  • Language English
  • Author Rabbi Yonassan Gershom
  • Publisher lulu.com (March 14, 2010)
  • Pages 256
  • Formats docx mobi txt azw
  • Category Fantasy
  • Subcategory Science Fiction
  • Size ePub 1732 kb
  • Size Fb2 1289 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 644

Rabbi Gershom takes you where no rabbi has gone before! You don't have to be Jewish to enjoy this well-researched and reader-friendly journey into Jewish themes, actors, writers, in-jokes and subtexts in the Star Trek Universe. Inspired by a class he taught at the Minneapolis Talmud Torah, the book explores such things as: The Jewish origin of the Vulcan salute; How Vulcan culture is based on rabbinical Judaism; "Who is a Jew" among Trek characters in episodes, movies and the novels; How Talmudic logic helped expand the Star Trek universe; Why Ferengi values are NOT Jewish values -- and much more!

Are Holocaust Victims Returning? Jewish Themes in Star Trek. Works in progress: Notes from a Jewish Naturalist. Where no rabbi has gone before! Rabbi Yonassan Gershom. Disclaimer: This book is a work of independent literary criticism.

Are Holocaust Victims Returning? Jewish Themes in Star Trek. The opinions expressed within it are entirely those of the author, and do not represent Paramount Pictures, CBS, or any person or entity connected to or involved with creating or marketing the franchise known as Star Trek.

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If you are Jewish and interested in Star Trek, I think this is your book. Granted, many of the things that were referred to were obvious (Vulcan salute anyone?) there are others I did not think about until I read this book such as the similarities between Jews and say Bajorans. This book covers TOS; TNG, DS9, VOY, ENT (also a little TAS) and all movies up to "Reboot" (aka 2009) as well as many of the books.

In my book Jewish Themes in Star Trek, I wrote: Candles lit for the Jewish Festival of Lights. On several occasions, while writing this book, I was told that a Hanukkah party had indeed been mentioned in The Next Generation series. Unfortunately, the story turned out to be nothing more than another urban legend.

Yonassan Gershom is a Rabbi and writer who was ordained in the Jewish Renewal movement during the 1980s and is now a follower of Breslov Hasidism. He was associated with the early days of the B'nai Or movement, a forerunner of Jewish Renewal, in which he was ordained by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi in 1986, although he is not in agreement with the direction that the movement has taken in more recent years.

Город: Minnesota, USAПодписчиков: 1 ты. себе: Breslov Hasid, vegetarian,

Город: Minnesota, USAПодписчиков: 1 ты. себе: Breslov Hasid, vegetarian, I block missionaries. RT doesn't always agree. No chickens 4kaporos (Blocked by Shatner over autism issues.

Inspired by a class he taught at the Minneapolis Talmud Torah, the book explores such things as: The Jewish origin of the Vulcan salute; How Vulcan culture is based on rabbinical Judaism; "Who is a Jew" among Trek characters in episodes, movies and the novels; How Talmudic logic helped expand the Star Trek universe; Why Ferengi values are NOT Jewish values

Talk about Jewish Themes in Star Trek


Wenyost
Entertaining, thought-provoking, and informative. A must-read for any serious Jewish or non-Jewish Trekker, or anyone interested in the role Jews have played in popular culture.
Meztihn
Not sure about "characters" and plot, because this is more of an autobiography (and somewhat non-fiction) than a fiction piece. What I enjoyed was Rabbi Gershom's information on Jewish philosophy and beliefs that I was unfamiliar with. He's also a pretty darn good writer!
MEGA FREEDY
I ordered this book for an "Adult Education" class at the Synagogue. Unfortunately, the class time and days were changed to the point that I couldn't attend. Seemed like a good idea at the time, so I read it anyway....

(One of our recent Rabbi's was a bit of a Trekkie. The current Rabbi hasn't admitted anything to me, but he has a background that's about as eclectic as Rabbi Gershom's, so....)

Perhaps because I'm Jewish, and fairly Secular at that, I don't see things in Jewish terms the way Rabbi Gershom seems to sometimes, but enjoyed the references anyway. I'd put "plausible" rather than "definite" on a couple of things....

Well written, I think, and while not exactly a page-turner, pretty good. Some things in there that I'd not noticed before. I'm old enough to have watched the Original Series "live", and I think, bless my VCR, I've seen every episode of every version (and probably most of the animated series) at least once. STTNG is kind of sterile, and Voyager a little too off the wall at times. My preference is "Enterprise", although I think I'm alone....

I'd always thought that I understood Saavik's comments to Spock, btw, but never realized why....

My only complaint is that Rabbi Gershom seems to presume we're familiar with the various secondary works - fanzines, novels, etc. I've read a couple and didn't like them. The only book I was familiar with in this sense was the original "Making" for the original series. I might have a copy here, but a recent move and some basement flooding at the prior residence may have killed that.

Just IMHO, but if you're Jewish and a serious Trekkie, a must read. Otherwise, just fun....
Vizil
Interesting ideas and good attention to details but some ideas are a little stretched and opinionated especially some ideas on Israel
Foiuost
Adds to the infinite diversity of views on why the Star Trek phenomena is greater than the sum of its fans.
Roru
.....as it combines two of my favorite things.

The content alone would get 4 or maybe even 4.5 stars. The discussion of the parallels between Jewish thought and the Star Trek view of the universe really was fascinating ;-)

Unfortunately, I found the lack of an editor's touch very frustrating. Chekov's name spelled multiple ways in different places, the Oklahoma City bomber called Anthony McVeigh (his name was Timothy McVeigh, which a quick visit to Google would have corrected), and calling Worf's adoptive parents his stepparents really got in the way of enjoying the fairly interesting content. Picky - maybe. But missing on details like that makes it hard for me to trust the content -- did the author miss on other, more important details where I didn't know enough to catch it?

So, while the theme/content was covered reasonably well, I can only give the overall book 2.5 (rounded to 3; to be generous and because I really did like the topic discussion) stars.
Bloodhammer
I am a non-Jew, but work in a Jewish library (and therefore, I like to think, have a fairly good grasp on Jewish literature, if not Jewish thought), so I think I have a fairly unique viewpoint. I'm also a Trekkie, of course.
I quite enjoyed this book and learned quite a bit about both the Star Trek universe, as well as the Jewish connections in it. I was aware of some of the more well known bits (the Vulcan salute, for example) but it had never even occurred to me to wonder which of the characters might be Jewish. As a scholar of religion, the section on Gene Roddenberry's religious background was also very useful in analyzing how he ended up creating some of the details in the Star Trek universe.
We hope to use a section of this book in our book club in the near future, and I believe there will be a great deal of excellent discussion, as there is plenty of wonderfully debatable information provided.
I would also recommend checking out Rabbi Gershom's website, trekjews.com, which contains many useful and informative links to other Jewish and religious Trek related sites.