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Download Dune: The Butlerian Jihad: Book One of the Legends of Dune Trilogy ePub

by Scott Brick,Brian Herbert

Download Dune: The Butlerian Jihad: Book One of the Legends of Dune Trilogy ePub
  • ISBN 1559277556
  • ISBN13 978-1559277556
  • Language English
  • Author Scott Brick,Brian Herbert
  • Publisher Macmillan Audio; Unabridged edition (September 17, 2002)
  • Formats docx lit doc txt
  • Category Fantasy
  • Subcategory Science Fiction
  • Size ePub 1857 kb
  • Size Fb2 1435 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 368

Frank Herbert's Dune series is one of the grandest epics in the annals of imaginative literature. Selling millions of copies worldwide, it is science fiction's answer to The Lord of the Rings, a brilliantly imaginative epic of high adventure, unforgettable characters, and immense scope.

Decades after Herbert's original novels, the Dune saga was continued by Frank Herbert's son, Brian Herbert, an acclaimed SF novelist in his own right, in collaboration with Kevin J. Anderson. Their New York Times bestselling trilogy, Dune: House Atreides, Dune: House Harkonnen, and Dune: House Corrino, formed a prequel to the classic Herbert series that was acclaimed by reviewers and readers alike. Now Herbert and Anderson, working from Frank Herbert's own notes, reveal a pivotal epoch in the history of the Dune universe, the chapter of the saga most eagerly anticipated by readers: The Butlerian Jihad.

Throughout the Dune novels, Frank Herbert frequently referred to the long-ago war in which humans wrested their freedom from "thinking machines." Now, in Dune: Butlerian Jihad, Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson bring to life the story of that war, a tale previously seen only in tantalizing hints and clues. Finally, we see how Serena Butler's passionate grief ignites the war that will liberate humans from their machine masters. We learn the circumstances of the betrayal that made mortal enemies of House Atreides and House Harkonnen; and we experience the Battle of Corrin that created a galactic empire that lasted until the reign of Emperor Shaddam IV.

Herein are the foundations of the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood, the Suk Doctors, the Order of Mentats, and the mysteriously altered Navigators of the Spacing Guild. Here is the amazing tale of the Zensunni Wanderers, who escape bondage to flee to the desert world where they will declare themselves the Free Men of Dune. And here is the backward, nearly forgotten planet of Arrakis, where traders have discovered the remarkable properties of the spice melange . . . .

Ten thousand years before the events of Dune, humans have managed to battle the remorseless Machines to a standstill . . . but victory may be short-lived. Yet amid shortsighted squabbling between nobles, new leaders have begun to emerge. Among them are Xavier Harkonnen, military leader of the Planet of Salusa Secundus; Xavier's fiancée, Serena Butler, an activist who will become the unwilling leader of millions; and Tio Holtzman, the scientist struggling to devise a weapon that will help the human cause. Against the brute efficiency of their adversaries, these leaders and the human race have only imagination, compassion, and the capacity for love. It will have to be enough.


Book 1 of 3 in the Dune Legends Trilogy Series.

Book 1 of 3 in the Dune Legends Trilogy Series. The eldest son of science fiction superstar Frank Herbert, he, with Kevin J. Anderson, is the author of Hellhole and continues his father's beloved Dune series with books including The Winds of Dune, House Atreides, Sandworms of Dune, among other bestsellers. He also wrote a biography of his father, Dreamer of Dune.

Much like the Dune "House" trilogy books that preceded "Jihad", this book is overlong and filled with chapters that . The book is also inconsistent with the other Dune books. They refer to things that haven't happened yet with a twist. Like the Tleilaxu and their growing of body parts.

Much like the Dune "House" trilogy books that preceded "Jihad", this book is overlong and filled with chapters that could easily been condensed to background paragraphs. All of this incidental detail is suppose to give a reader insights into characters' motivations, but all it did was bore me. I plodded through to the end because I like knowing the background for the real Dune stories.

Frank Herbert's Dune series is one of the grandest epics in the annals of imaginative literature.

Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Frank Herbert's Dune series is one of the grandest epics in the annals of imaginative literature. Selling millions of copies worldwide, it is science fiction's answer to The Lord of the Rings, a brilliantly imaginative epic of high adventure, unforgettable characters, and immense scope.

Book One of the Legends of Dune Trilogy. Dune (Volume 1). Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson; Read by Scott Brick. Mass Market Paperbound. Now Herbert and Anderson, working from Frank Herbert's own notes, reveal a pivotal epoch in the history of the Dune universe, the chapter of the saga most eagerly anticipated by readers: The Butlerian Jihad.

Dune: The Butlerian Jihad is a 2002 science fiction novel by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson, set in the fictional Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. It is the first book in the Legends of Dune prequel trilogy, which takes place over 10,000. It is the first book in the Legends of Dune prequel trilogy, which takes place over 10,000 years before the events of Frank Herbert's celebrated 1965 novel Dune.

Электронная книга "Dune: The Butlerian Jihad: Book One of the Legends of Dune Trilogy", Brian Herbert, Kevin J. Anderson

Электронная книга "Dune: The Butlerian Jihad: Book One of the Legends of Dune Trilogy", Brian Herbert, Kevin J. Anderson. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Dune: The Butlerian Jihad: Book One of the Legends of Dune Trilogy" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Dune: The Butlerian Jihad: Book One of the Legends of Dune Trilogy. Throughout the Dune novels, Frank Herbert frequently referred to the long-ago war in which humans wrested their freedom from "thinking machines. by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Now, in Dune: Butlerian Jihad, Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson bring to life the story of that war, a tale previously seen only in tantalizing hints and clues. Finally, we see how Serena Butler's passionate grief ignites the war that will liberate humans from their machine masters.

The Butlerian Jihad book. Frank Herbert's Dune series is one of the great creations of imaginative literature, science fiction's answer to The Lord of the Rings. Decades after Herbert's original novels, the Dune saga was continued by Frank Herbert's son, Brian Herbert, in collaboration with Kevin J. Working from Frank Herbert's own notes, the acclaimed authors reveal the chapter of the Frank Herbert's Dune series is one of the great creations of imaginative literature, science fiction's answer to The Lord of the Rings.

The Butlerian Jihad . The Great Revolt - two generations of chaos (200 BG - 108 BG). The god of machine-logic was overthrown by the masses and a new concept was raised: "Man may not be replaced. After two generations of violence, humanity took pause. Following this, their gods and rituals were looked upon in a different, perhaps even jaded, light. Both were largely seen to be guilty of using fear as a means of control.

Talk about Dune: The Butlerian Jihad: Book One of the Legends of Dune Trilogy


Urtte
The Butlerian Jihad is the first installment of a trilogy, a prequel of a prequel of sorts ostensibly based on the notes and writings of Frank Herbert, deceased. For those of you that don't know, The Butlerian Jihad takes place ten thousand years before the time of originator, Frank Herberts, immensely popular book Dune. It is a collaboration between Brian Herbert (Frank's son)and Kevin Anderson. It is the fourth book co-written by these authors that I know of, having just finished another trilogy/prequel, The House series (House Atriedes, Harkonnen and Corrin).

By reading The Butlerian Jihad, I finally got to experience the distant past, which was constantly but vaguely alluded to in the original Dune novels.

We get to meet the beautiful, compassionate Serena Butler, who's year old son, the murder of which, set off the rebellion, which eventually brought down the heartless thinking machines. We also meet distant relatives of Baron Harkonnen - Xavier (who is a good and honorable person) and Paul Atriedes - Vorian (the son of the wicked Titan, Agamemnon {a thousand year old human brain in a mechanical body})and Tio Holtzman (the revered inventor of the Holtzman Effect and other inventions). We experience the last stronghold of free humanity, with The League of Nobles, the fledgling exportation of the spice Melange from Arrakis and the precursor of the Bene Gesserit, in the Sorceress's of Rossak.

Background

The Old Empire was stagnant if not decadent and humanity had lost it's drive allowing machines to perform all major work and tasks. This malaise permitted a small but vicious group of twenty revolutionaries to stage a coup and take over the Empire. This group called themselves Titans and their bloody rule was short lived (fifty years) as the Titans being short in number, mistakenly allowed the Thinking Machines too much responsibility, whereupon they usurped the power.

Prior to the Machines "putsch" the Titans, striving for immortality, became Cymeks - Human brains housed in a cannister within a mechanical body. After the Machine revolution, the Titan/Cymeks became reluctant servants of the Evermind - Omnius, the head Thinking Machine. Humans existed within Omnius's empire but were mostly slaves with a few Trustees.

The Butlerian Jihad begins the epic struggle encompassing humanities rebellion against the thinking machines, which sets the tone of a future in which the total rejection of any sort of thinking machines is a reality. Our Story begins a thousand years after Omnius's victory over the Titans

The Plot

Although The Thinking Machines Empire (called Synchronized Planets) consisted of thousands of inhabited planets, there were many inhabited worlds still outside the Empire's boundaries, some of which had formed a federation called the League of Nobles (primarily as a defense mechanism). Though Omnius considered the battle with humans to be inefficient, with prompting from the remaining Titans (after a thousand years, there were five) and especially Agamemnon, the defacto Titan leader/spokesman, Omnius undertook the conquest of the remaining free worlds.

The Story

This first installment covers a period of some three or fours years of the epic conflict. During this time the main three characters go through many tribulations. Dune's incarnation of evil, Baron Harkonnen's distant ancestor Xavier Harkonnen is a Primero (General) in the League's army. He and the lovely Serena are engaged but while on a mission, Serena takes on a mission of her her own, a radical plan to save the besieged Planet Gedi Prime. The Plan is successful but Serena is captured by the machines and taken to the their primary world Earth.

On Earth Serena, who is pregnant with Xavier's child is given to the ever curious independent robot, Erasmus as one of his house servants. Erasmus who likes to think of himself an expert on human beings, has been studying specimens for hundreds of years and being a robot is indifferent to the plight and pain of his victims. He is intrigued however by the imperious but humane and unflappable Serena. Also intrigued is Vorian Atriedes, a trustee and the son of the bloodthirsty Titan, Agamemnon. Vorian who believes his father to be a hero and a great warrior is informed otherwise by Serena. Not believing her at first he is shocked when learning the truth after researching his fathers brutal past.

Meanwhile Serena gives birth to Manion a bubbly toe head. Unfortunately being an infant, Manion requires much attention, taking time away from Erasmus's constant inquisitions. Serena is constantly trying to help the other household slaves and Erasmus sees this is a way to remove the troublesome toddler and punish Serena by getting rid of Manion. Erasmus has totally misjudged the situation and instead of finding Serena properly cowled he finds rage and his action was the catalyst that provided the spark which started a world wide rebellion.

With the entire planet in turmoil Vorian being a Trustee and using subterfuge gains possession of a ship which allows Serena, another Trustee named Iglis Ginjo, and himself to escape to Serena's home planet, Salsua Secundus.

It is a this point that Serena enjoins the entire free human race to rededicate themselves to a rejuvenated holy war - A Jihad against the Thinking Machines. From this point forward Serena Butler is known as the Priestess of the Jihad.
Agantrius
Much like the Dune "House" trilogy books that preceded "Jihad", this book is overlong and filled with chapters that could easily been condensed to background paragraphs. All of this incidental detail is suppose to give a reader insights into characters' motivations, but all it did was bore me. I plodded through to the end because I like knowing the background for the real Dune stories.
What I love about the first four Dune books are the themes of transformation: people, places and technology all interact to create new levels of existence that are stunning, mystifying, heartbreaking and unforgettable. A reader will not get that experience from this book.
What a reader will get are blindly ambitious people, inane, excessive and pointless details about peripheral characters, obligatory cruel and obtuse oppressors (esoteric sci-fi quibble: didn't these guys see the "Matrix" movies? Far better representation of AI dominance) and, thankfully, seeds of the universe to come: the Holtzmann fields and shields, the development of the spice, the Bene Gesserit, Fremen, Tlexalu and Spacing Guild antecedents, and, of course, the twisted family trees of the Corrinos, Harkonnens and Atreides.
For the next two books ("Crusade" & "Battle"), I will be looking for "Cliff Note" versions, which will give me the background information I desire without meaningless filler! Where's a good editor when you need one? :)
Onetarieva
I have to say, this book does not live up to the standards of the 'Dune' series. Although it's not a half bad book in itself, it just doesn't fit in with anything else - not even the 'house' books by the same author.

For starters, the characters don't have nearly the dimension that they did in previous books. It's hard to connect with them sometimes.

The constant one-line ending to each chapter that the author is using is more than annoying. Ex: (after inspecting a planet to watch for weaknesses against the robots) "And completely unaware of the vulnerabilities he had not bothered to discover..." Of course he wouldn't discover it!!! If he did, there would be no next chapter!!! There are so many stupid endings to these chapters, it's sickening. Half of them could be ended one sentence before, and you know something's going to happen, so why foreshadow?

The book is also inconsistent with the other Dune books. They refer to things that haven't happened yet with a twist. Like the Tleilaxu and their growing of body parts. In this book, they claim to tell people they're capable of creating parts, but then it adds 'but the truth is that technology is years off - they really chop up slaves'. (pls note that is not a quote).

I guess if this book had to stand alone as a story, it wouldn't be bad. It just doesn't live up to the legacy. It's a shame when it seems like the author is hammering out books to make a profit as opposed to carrying on his father's dream for people to enjoy.
Tegore
Despite what you've read elsewhere, this book doesn't answer any of the questions that you might expect. The only real item from this era covered thorougly in this book is Holtzmann, and he comes across as a standard scientist character (see other reviews).
The beginnings of the Sisterhood are hinted at, folding space is touched on, the origins of the Bene Theliax are explored a bit. And that's about it. The whole book spends its time setting up things, but not explaining anything. Yeah, there's a backstory of the Jihad itself but that's not why Dune fans bought the book.
The Mentats aren't brought out, the use of Melange by the Sisterhood isn't explored (they shun drugs at this point), the Harkkonen betrayal, the Guild, the final extermination of the computer minds, and many other things are all left up in the air...
...for a sequel.