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Download The Serpent: The Serpent Pt. 1 ePub

by Jane Gaskell

Download The Serpent: The Serpent Pt. 1 ePub
  • ISBN 0426159314
  • ISBN13 978-0426159315
  • Language English
  • Author Jane Gaskell
  • Publisher TBS The Book Service Ltd; New edition edition (September 24, 1975)
  • Pages 320
  • Formats mobi rtf azw docx
  • Category Fantasy
  • Subcategory Science Fiction
  • Size ePub 1955 kb
  • Size Fb2 1312 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 596

Tandem, British mass market paperback, 1975. The first book (or the first part of the first book) in the Atlan / Cija series. After first publication, the original novel "The Serpent" was split into two separate novels, The Serpent" and "The Dragon." Set in prehistoric South America and in the mythical world of Atlantis. The books in the series are: "The Serpent (1963); and "The Dragon" (1963); "Atlan" (1965); "The City" (1966); and "Some Summer Lands" (1977). "This edition of THE SERPENT is the first part of the original hardback edition. The story continues in THE DRAGON."

The best part about this is that Jane Gaskell covers these topics honestly.

In the lost world of prehistory, a girl is born. The best part about this is that Jane Gaskell covers these topics honestly. None of it is titillating or sexy, and even though I don’t love reading about super real problems like these, there was an authenticity to her writing that made me feel better. I know that sounds bizarre.

The Serpent is a novel by British writer Jane Gaskell. It was first published in 1963. It is the first part of the Atlan series, a set of four (or five) fantasy novels set in prehistoric times. The following novels are Atlan, The City and Some Summer Lands. The stories are set in Atlantis and South America. The Serpent was also published split into two books, titled The Serpent and The Dragon, hence the confusion over the numbering of the volumes.

by. Gaskell, Jane, 1941-. ark:/13960/t0gt6qr3p. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

The Serpent is a novel by Jane Gaskell.

Satan, disguised as a serpent, is. .Here, Gaskell has no hesitation in using a real place-name from the area. 4 ‘A crust of bread and liberty’: last line of Imitations of Horace, Book II, satire VI (1738) by Alexander Pope (1688–1744).

Satan, disguised as a serpent, is discovered by the angels in his role as tempter: ‘him there they found/Squat like a toad, close at the eare of Ev. 2 an apple of Sodom: see n. 1 to Chapter XIII. 3 Robin Hood's Bay: coastal fishing and resort village about seven miles south of Whitby. 4 ‘From him that would ask’: misquotation of Matthew 5:42: ‘Give to him that asketh thee, and from him that would borrow of thee turn not away. The Serpent" was also published split into two books, titled "The Serpent" and "The Dragon," hence the confusion over the numbering of the volumes. The protagonist of the novel is Cija (pronounced 'kee-yah'), the illegitimate child of the Dictatress of a small kingdom and a priest of high rank.

The Serpent by Jane Gaskell. Gaskell throws in some jarring anachronisms; one of the characters talks about "sublimating" sexual desire, and the army's quartermaster demands that requests be made in "triplicate" and carries around a little notebook

The Serpent by Jane Gaskell. I've never actually read a "historical romance" novel, but The Serpent is rather like what I imagine them to be, though The Serpent is set in a fantasy prehistory, when the Earth had no moon and dinosaurs, giant snails, and half-reptile people lived alongside ordinary humans. Gaskell throws in some jarring anachronisms; one of the characters talks about "sublimating" sexual desire, and the army's quartermaster demands that requests be made in "triplicate" and carries around a little notebook.

The story continues in THE DRAGON. The last chapter of this volume is Chapter V "The Kitchen at .

Talk about The Serpent: The Serpent Pt. 1


Coron
anyone who enjoys fantasy adventure fiction will love this trilogy. Jane Gaskell writes with a distinct voice and her protagonist Cija, is a wonderful and real character faced with fantastic circumstances
fetish
The Serpent by Jane Gaskell

I've never actually read a "historical romance" novel, but The Serpent is rather like what I imagine them to be, though The Serpent is set in a fantasy prehistory, when the Earth had no moon and dinosaurs, giant snails, and half-reptile people lived alongside ordinary humans.

Cija is a princess who has spent the first 17 years of her life locked up in a tower with her female servants, due to a curse and a prophecy. She has never even seen a man; in fact, she was told that men were extinct. When a foreign army takes over Cija's country, Cija's mother has to give Cija to the invading army's general as a hostage. Cija's mother tells Cija to seduce the general and stab him in the neck in his sleep. This is not so easy as Cija's countrymen might hope, because the army with which Cija now marches is full of beautiful girls who are all trying to seduce the general, who, despite the fact that he has scaly skin like a grey snake's, is a real hunk. Can Cija triumph over her rivals and get into the snakeman's bed? Can Cija bring herself to murder the hunk, even if she has the chance?

The pace is slow, and the plot is not resolved as this is the first volume (300 pages long) of a series. There are many characters, most of them involved in catty relationships based on envy and jealousy. The whole thing is kind of squalid and cynical. Neither Cija nor the snakeman general is interesting enough that I cared whether they fell in love or killed each other or whatever. At times I wondered if this book was meant to appeal to the S&M crowd; people get flogged, women get raped, there are lots of slave girls who get groped and beaten, etc. Gaskell throws in some jarring anachronisms; one of the characters talks about "sublimating" sexual desire, and the army's quartermaster demands that requests be made in "triplicate" and carries around a little notebook. (Aren't paper and ink expensive in this preindustrial society?) Gaskell also tosses in an impassioned plea for government regulation of chemical fertilizers and preservatives. There are also lots of "literary" descriptions of the weather, landscape, light playing on gilded columns and reflecting off panes of glass and so on.

I read the Pocket Books 1978 edition of this 1963 novel, the one with the Boris Vallejo cover and the Soho Weekly News blurb. ("A thrill a minute!" we are told.) I counted ten phallic symbols in Boris's cover painting; see how many you can spot!

Not really for me, but Gaskell is admirably ambitious and seems to have an extensive vision, so 2 stars.