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Download Spadework ePub

by Timothy Findley

Download Spadework ePub
  • ISBN 0060932627
  • ISBN13 978-0060932626
  • Language English
  • Author Timothy Findley
  • Publisher Harper Perennial (December 24, 2002)
  • Pages 416
  • Formats doc docx lit azw
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Contemporary
  • Size ePub 1712 kb
  • Size Fb2 1388 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 384

Lust. Infidelity. Betrayal. Murder.

On a summer evening in Stratford, Ontario, the errant thrust of agardener’s spade slices a telephone cable into instant silence. The resulting disconnection is devastating. With the failure of one call to reach a house, an ambitious young actor becomes the victim of sexual blackmail. The blocking of a second call leads tragically to murder. And when a Bell Canada repairman arrives to mend the broken line, his innocent yet irresistible male beauty has explosive consequences.

In Spadework, Timothy Findley, master storyteller and playwright, has created an electric wordplay of infidelity and morality set on the stage of Canada’s preeminent theater town. In this fictional portrait, intrigue, passion, and ambition are always waiting in the wings. Findley peoples the town with theater folk, artists, writers, and visitors (both welcome and unwelcome), and with lives that are immediately recognizable as "Findley-esque" -- the lonely, the dispossessed, and the sexually troubled.

A story that ripples with ever-widening repercussions, a sensual, witty, and completely absorbing novel, Spadework is another Timothy Findley winner.


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Spadework was Timothy Findley’s final novel before his death in June 2002. An electric word play of infidelity and morality.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

Timothy Irving Frederick Findley, OC OOnt (October 30, 1930 – June 20, 2002) was a Canadian novelist and playwright. He was also informally known by the nickname Tiff or Tiffy, an acronym of his initials. One of three sons, Findley was born in Toronto, Ontario, to Allan Gilmour Findley, a stockbroker, and his wife, the former Margaret Maude Bull. His paternal grandfather was president of Massey-Harris, the farm-machinery company.

In Spadework, Timothy Findley, master storyteller and playwright, has created an electric wordplay of infidelity and morality set on the stage of Canada’s preeminent theater town. In this fictional portrait, intrigue, passion, and ambition are always waiting in the wings. Findley peoples the town with theater folk, artists, writers, and visitors (both welcome and unwelcome), and with lives that are immediately recognizable as "Findley-esque" - the lonely, the dispossessed, and the sexually troubled.

TIMOTHY FINDLEY (1930–2002) was one of Canada’s most compelling and best-loved writers

TIMOTHY FINDLEY (1930–2002) was one of Canada’s most compelling and best-loved writers. He is the author of The Wars, which won the Governor General’s Award and established him as one of Canada’s leading writers, as well Pilgrim and The Piano Man’s Daughter, both finalists for the Giller Prize

Spadework was Timothy Findley’s final novel before his death in June 2002. An electric word play of infidelity and morality, it is fitting that the novel is set in Stratford, the town where Findley began his career as an actor. Known for his gift in plumbing the depths of the human condition, Findley digs deep in Spadework with a cast of characters, each one motivated by addictions and ambitions, each one very alone.

Spadework by Timothy Findley 428pp, Faber, £1. 9. Timothy Findley died in the summer of 2002. Which means there won't be another Pilgrim, nor another The Piano Man's Daughter ; no more Famous Last Words. This may not mean much to some people: it is probably safe to say that Findley is not well known in Britain.

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And when a Bell Canada repairmanarrives to mend the broken line, his innocent yetirresistible male beauty has explosive consequences. In Spadework, Timothy Findley a master storytellerand playwright, has created an electric word-play ofinfidelity and morality, set on the stage of Stratford,Ontario Findley’s home territory. In this insider’sfictional portrait of Canada’s pre-eminent theater town,intrigue, passion and ambition are always waiting in thewings.

Find nearly any book by Timothy Findley (page 3). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9780140109610 (978-0-14-010961-0) Softcover, Penguin Canada, 1996. Find signed collectible books: 'Famous Last Words'. Inside memory: Pages from a writer's workbook. ISBN 9780002156974 (978-0-00-215697-4) Hardcover, ers, 1990.

Talk about Spadework


Rare
great characters. I identified with them
Gathris
Timothy Findley's "Spadework" doesn't conform to any specific type or genre in literary fiction. To begin with, it's most certainly not a murder mystery or thriller the blurb suggests it is - Penguin Books, its UK publisher, should be rapped for being misleading. So, what kind of book is it ? A tale of marital breakdown, lust and ambition among members of a theatrical community in Ontario ? Hard to say.
But love - all sorts of love - takes centre stage in "Spadework". There's conjugal love between struggling stage actor Griffin Kincaid and his prop designer wife Jane, love between parent and child (as between the Kincaids and their son Will), love between family members (as between gardener Luke and his young troubled uncle Jesse), homosexual love or lust of stage director Jonathan for Griffin, mature love between housekeeper Mercy and Luke, and Jane's idealised love for the Bell repairman Milos. According to Findley, love caves in under pressure, its manifest qualities change albeit temporarily. Like an elastic band, it finds its original shape eventually.
Findley's characterisation doesn't always succeed. His supporting characters like Mercy, Luke, Milos and Claire fare much better than his protagonists. With each page, I found Jane increasingly shrill and irritating and I began to feel she deserves what's happening to her.....until Milos turns up and she wanders into a dream world of her own and becomes interesting as a human being once again. Griffin's character is the most problematic. He's supposed to be desperate and ambitious and his sudden abandonment of his family for Jonathan's casting couch is a move that suggests he has sold his soul to the devil - remember Rosemary's husband in "Rosemary's Baby" ? - but in truth, he's a wimp and his return to the family fold after Jonathan's confessional is a bizarre twist that strains credibility and ends the story on a hastily executed feel-good note.
Quite apart from revealing his roots as a playwright, Findley's liberal use of asides and self directed utterances to punctuate his narrative is also a devise that doesn't quite work. Indeed, I found it unhelpful and distracting and gives the novel an incongruous feel about it. There is nevertheless much to enjoy in "Spadework". The good parts are excellent and they'll make it all worthwhile for you.
Olelifan
From a writer whose publicity bills him as "Canada's greatest living writer," this book is both a surprise and a disappointment. Telling the story of a group of participants in Ontario's Stratford Festival, the book includes many subplots, all dealing with some issue of love--love from the past, young love, new love, love of children, homosexual love, thwarted love, love of self, love of career--and the extent to which the characters are willing to sacrifice for it.

While some of the dialogue, such as that in an early birthday party scene, pops and crackles, as one would expect in the writing of a playwright, other aspects of the book creak and groan, weighed down by irrelevant details and a shocking number of cliches. Ten pages into the book, Jane comments that she is the luckiest girl in the world. "I've got everything I wanted," she says. One is not surprised, then, when fate decides to teach her a lesson in the ensuing 400 pages.

The personal conflicts which evolve are too shallow to allow for the illumination of great themes, and the characters are one-dimensional, prone to observations one has read many times in many other novels. Upon seeing the Bell telephone man, Jane decides, "He was the most beautiful man she had ever seen. But his beauty was more than physical. There was something...indefinable." Her psychiatrist has a print of Paul Klee's "Scholar 1933" on the wall, "his inner eye, his daily reminder...that life was full of endless mystery and that nothing was known." An outdoor love scene takes place against a background with "not a single cloud. And yet...There was thunder." And it is difficult to take seriously a reference to "the voice of a man she barely knew, but a man she also knew she loved."

For those who enjoy sentimental stories and can do not mind cliches, this novel provides a look at life in a theater company and a great many love stories, which end, literally, with "the sound of water flowing over the dam." Mary Whipple
Coron
This novel is to books what "Plan 9 From Outer Space" is to movies. So laughably bad, the only thing that kept me reading it was the wonder that the author could go on for so long and be so consistantly terrible in his writing. I'm not going to reprise the plot, but here's a little background and an example. The main character, Jane, flees from her controlling and straight-laced Southern lady of a mother. When she announces her intention to leave the mother replies (and so help-me-God this is a quote), "...You don' just stan' up an' walk away f'm Cloud Hill. F'm family. You just don' do that. All them years o' history..." It goes on like this, but I'll spare you reading the rest. Real believable dialogue from well-mannered Southern lady isn't it? That's just a small example. The dialogue in this book is all pretty horrible, and the descriptions of conversations only make it worse. People will be having an argument, then suddenly "beam" at each other. The act of opening bottles of wine should really be thought of as a main character it happens so often and with such over-blown description. None of the interaction of any of the characters is believable, in fact, they are so odd there is a kind of sick fascination to reading this as you have never, will never, know people who react or talk like Mr. Findlay's characters. This book is billed as a "National Bestseller". The only plausible explanation I can think of is; (a) Guam is suddenly declared a sovereign nation (b) a shipment of these books is mistakenly shipped to Guam (c) a bookseller on Guam unfortunately sells 3 of these books and is subsequently lynched. A far-fetched scenario you think? Good Lord, let's hope Timothy Findlay doesn't read this review as he would probably think it was a reasonable plot line and explore it for an excruciating number of pages.