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Download The Verificationist ePub

by Donald Antrim (author)

Download The Verificationist ePub
  • ISBN 074755286X
  • ISBN13 978-0747552864
  • Language English
  • Author Donald Antrim (author)
  • Publisher BLOOMSBURY; New Ed edition (January 22, 2001)
  • Formats mbr lrf rtf txt
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Contemporary
  • Size ePub 1697 kb
  • Size Fb2 1509 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 759


Donald Antrim is in top form with this high-spirited hallucination, whose characters, undeniably ourselves, carry .

Donald Antrim is in top form with this high-spirited hallucination, whose characters, undeniably ourselves, carry on engagingly and shamelessly in an off-the-wall, not to mention off-the ceiling, environment that is also the world we know, and sometimes wish we didn't. With" The Verificationist, Donald Antrim, acclaimed author of The Hundred Brothers, confirms his place as one of America's strangest and fiercely intelligent young writers.

Donald Antrim is the critically acclaimed author of Elect Mr. Robinson for a Better World, The Hundred Brothers, and The Verificationist, as well The Afterlife, a memoir about his mother. A regular contributor to The New Yorker, he has also been the recipient of a MacArthur "Genius" Grant and fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York Public Library. He lives in New York City.

With The Verificationist, Donald Antrim, acclaimed author of The Hundred Brothers, confirms his place as one of America's strangest and fiercely intelligent young writers. At the center of this With The Verificationist, Donald Antrim, acclaimed author of The Hundred Brothers, confirms his place as one of America's strangest and fiercely intelligent young writers

With The Verificationist, Donald Antrim, acclaimed author of The Hundred Brothers, confirms his place as one of America's strangest and fiercely intelligent young writers

With The Verificationist, Donald Antrim, acclaimed author of The Hundred Brothers, confirms his place as one of America's strangest and fiercely intelligent young writers. When Tom tries to initiate a food fight, a rival psychologist bear hugs him into submission, resulting in an out-of-body experience that leaves our Tom hovering over his colleagues.

With a New Introduction by George Saunders. It is early spring, and Tom has called together his fellow psychologists at the Krakower Institute for their biannual pancake supper-a chance for likeminded analysts to talk shop and casually unburden themselves over flapjacks.

The Verificationist is a 2000 novel by American author Donald Antrim. The novel follows the conversations, fantasies, and the emotionally dissociated states of a group of psychoanalysts gathered during a nocturnal pancake supper.

WithThe Verificationist, Donald Antrim, acclaimed author ofThe Hundred Brothers, confirms his place as one of America's strangest and fiercely intelligent young writers. Taking the novel to a new place. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 17 years ago. Somehow I think the definitive novel is one that is free to say anything about anything as Antrim does here and in his other novels. The trick is( or the art is) if its enjoyable and interesting.

Introduction by george saunders. On first read, the book presents as a long, spontaneous act of pure invention. Arf, why does this GRASS feel so terrific? Sometimes, writhing in pleasure on his back, a dog will pause to shoot a glance at his owner, as if to say: Sorry, master. Just a bit, you know, lost in delight over here. That’s how I thought of it anyway: a kind of grand comic yelp, a prolonged victory of imaginative whimsy, a fever dream that produced some of the most acute and funny writing I’d ever read: structureless, free-associative, wild.

From "a fiercely intelligent writer" (The New York Times ), a wry, poignant story of the difficult love between a mother and a son. In the winter of 2000, shortly after his mother's death from cancer and malnourishment, Donald Antrim, author of the absurdist, visionary masterworks Elect Mr. Robinson for a Better World, The Hundred Brothers, and The Verificationist, began writing about his family. It is also the story of the way the author works, in part through writing this book, to become a man more fully alive to himself and to others, a man capable of a life in which he may never learn, or ever hope to know, the nature of his origins.

Donald Antrim's The Verificationist is a deadly serious, desperately playful, off-the-wall, and perfectly on-target book permeated by the unlikely smell of maple syrup in the evening and the sharpened consciousness of a group of psychoanalysts.

Talk about The Verificationist


Era
This 179-page novella is in a way the stream of consciousness of Tom, a middle-aged pyschologist who, meeting with his colleagues in a lower end pancake house, tries to start a food fight when a rival colleague, a burly man with a swollen ego, puts our narrator in a bear hug upon which Tom has an out of body experience in which he does a glorious exposition on the nature of pancake houses. The real business of this absurd (I mean that as a compliment), allegorical novel is to poke fun at the human need for safety, for mother, for the womb, all embodied by the pancake house. Tom's quest for a mother in the metaphorical sense compels him to invite his colleagues at this pancake emporium every year or so where they try to mend the their bruised egos, a quest that backfires. Antrim's major conflict in the novel is the human drive for safety vs. our utter sense of helplessness in this metaphysical parody, which showcases Antrim's brilliant writing skills. Why only four stars? Because after about 100 pages, I grew a bit tired of the metaphysical explorations. Similar themes are pursued with far more intensity and efficacy in my opinion in Antrim's 20-page essay, "I Bought a Bed," published in Best American Essays 2003.
Sirara
When I bought this book from amazon.com several months ago, I set it aside in my library to "save" it for a time when I needed an extra special read. From all the hoopla this book received, I expected to read a fabulous book, though certainly a strange one. Well, the strange part is true, but a fabulous book this is not.
During a pancake dinner for therapists, Tom has an out-of-body experience/nervous breakdown. Told in first person narrative, The Verificationist explores what Tom's physical body is going through, as well as where his "out of body" body is experiencing. Although the book didn't do for me what I'd expected, some of the passages were a rather interesting if depressing glimpse into the mind of a middle-aged man. If focusing on neuroses and insecurities is the kind of thing you like, then Tom's recollection of the discussion his wife had while he was going to the bathroom should be of interest. I'm almost embarrassed to admit I was drawn into it myself. Another scene, wherein Tom spies two of his colleagues engaged in what he believes are the preliminary battle lines drawn before sexual congress, is also fascinating.
All in all, though, this book added up to far less than the sum of its parts. Yes, the premise was unique, and while it did provide the occasional insight, more often than not the writing was self-indulgent.
TTFN, Laurie Likes Books
Publisher, All About Romance
Iell
Sometimes, when a book is CLEARLY schlocky, poorly written and/or unentertaining, it is easy to pan it without a second thought. With other books, however--which for the reader share only the "unentertaining" part--but which are otherwise not poorly written and on a more sophisticated level, one must step back and ask oneself: Let's wait a minute. Is it possible that this is a work of creative genius and that I simply don't "get it." That my imagination and/or intellect may be too limited to appreciate what a wonderful (provocative, intelligent, well-crafted, etc., etc.) book this actually is?
Well I asked myself those kinds of questions, and while I would readily concede that my reaction may well be a function of my own intellectual limitations, particularly given all the raves this book got, I don't care--I'm sticking with my convictions. I found the book to be almost insufferable throughout. It was nearly impossible for me to trudge all the way through- though I did, page by agonizing page, waiting for it to end. I simply can't believe that everyone who reads this book could find it so wonderful, and if I'm the only one in the world who would recommend against it, so be it.
FireWater
An unusual novel that promises but never fully delivers. Martin's characters and ideas keep you reading, but in the end there is no sense of resolution save for a literal release. The story isn't mundane by any means. However, the author, like the characters, seems to float around in the language and never really touches down.
Ytli
Strong writing, great humor and gravity mark this wildly unpredictable journey. Written with finesse and packed with imagery this story soars on and on.
Contancia
This tale has no comparison. A strange story that is amusing and hypnotic. You easily slip off the role of spectator and feel as if you are along for the ride.
Kanrad
Unusual imaginative fantasy.
Surprising to me, l feel like an "American Family Association" commentator? Be that as it may, an appearance of intellectualism may have disguised the multiple social boundary violations we've become used to in current entertainment. The redeeming feature may well be the authors ability to so grossly distort relationships, sexuality, the analytic study of these, and a pleasant evening out that verbosity replaces true meaning and we readers can rest assured that the emperor not only has no clothes but he may be having an out of body experience at the same time...