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Download A Pigeon and a Boy: A Novel ePub

by Meir Shalev

Download A Pigeon and a Boy: A Novel ePub
  • ISBN 0805242511
  • ISBN13 978-0805242515
  • Language English
  • Author Meir Shalev
  • Publisher Schocken; 1st U.S. Ed edition (October 16, 2007)
  • Pages 320
  • Formats mobi mbr azw rtf
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Contemporary
  • Size ePub 1475 kb
  • Size Fb2 1214 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 427

From the internationally acclaimed Israeli writer Meir Shalev comes a mesmerizing novel of two love stories, separated by half a century but connected by one enchanting act of devotion.During the 1948 War of Independence--a time when pigeons are still used to deliver battlefield messages--a gifted young pigeon handler is mortally wounded. In the moments before his death, he dispatches one last pigeon. The bird is carrying his extraordinary gift to the girl he has loved since adolescence. Intertwined with this story is the contemporary tale of Yair Mendelsohn, who has his own legacy from the 1948 war. Yair is a tour guide specializing in bird-watching trips who, in middle age, falls in love again with a childhood girlfriend. His growing passion for her, along with a gift from his mother on her deathbed, becomes the key to a life he thought no longer possible.  Unforgettable in both its particulars and its sweep, A Pigeon and A Boy is a tale of lovers then and now--of how deeply we love, of what home is, and why we, like pigeons trained to fly in one direction only, must eventually return to it.  In a voice that is at once playful, wise, and altogether beguiling, Meir Shalev tells a story as universal as war and as intimate as a winged declaration of love.

Meir Shalev was born in 1948 on Nahalal, Israel’s first moshav, and is one of Israel’s most celebrated novelists.

Only 19 left in stock (more on the way). Meir Shalev was born in 1948 on Nahalal, Israel’s first moshav, and is one of Israel’s most celebrated novelists. In 1999 the author was awarded the Juliet Club Prize (Italy).

A Pigeon and a Boy by Meir Shalev (2006, 311 pages, Read May 9-17, Paperback) translated from Hebrew by Evan Fallenberg, 2007 A beautifully written book that explores many themes, using homing. Пользовательский отзыв - ShaiShap - LibraryThing. I'm just not the target audience for it. It's generally well-written, I just didn't see anything unusual to be interested in.

Meir Shalev (Hebrew: מאיר שלו‎; born 29 July 1948) is an Israeli writer and newspaper columnist for the daily Yedioth Ahronoth. Shalev was born in Nahalal, Israel. Later he lived in Jerusalem and at Ginosar with his family. He is the son of the Jerusalem poet Yitzhak Shalev. Shalev was drafted into the IDF in 1966, and did his military service in the Golani Brigade.

A mesmerizing novel of two love stories, separated by half a century but connected by one enchanting act of devotion-from the internationally acclaimed Israeli writer Meir Shalev. In the moments before his death, he dispatches one last pigeon.

About A Pigeon and a Boy. A mesmerizing novel of two love stories, separated by half a century but connected by one enchanting act of devotion-from the internationally acclaimed Israeli writer Meir Shalev.

A Pigeon and a Boy book. From the internationally acclaimed Israeli writer Meir Shalev comes a mesmerizing novel of two love stories, separated by half a century but connected by one enchanting act of devotion.

A Pigeon and a Boy. Evan Fallenberg. In creating this novel, the author had an array of narrative choices

A Pigeon and a Boy. In creating this novel, the author had an array of narrative choices. What do you think of Shalev’s choice of a first-person narrator who speaks to you (his mother), as well as to us, the readers? Is Yair a trustworthy narrator? And how do our own personal experiences - of love, family, loss - affect our reaction to the novel?

Meir Shalev From the internationally acclaimed Israeli writer Meir Shalev comes a mesmerizing novel of two love stories, separated by half a century but connected by on. .

One of Israel's most celebrated novelists-the acclaimed author of A Pigeon and a Boy-now gives us a story of village love and vengeance in the early days of British Palestine that is still being played out two generations later.

Talk about A Pigeon and a Boy: A Novel


Mave
Spurts of lyrical writing mixed with violent imagery hover over the symbolic story of the quest for love and home. The novel weaves the tale of a young couple’s love during Israel’s war of Independence and the story of a young man’s journey decades later, to find his place in life, largely dominated by his mother.
Picturesque descriptions of Israel during the different periods invoke realistic visions of the not so distant past. Poetic verse of soft hued tones turns in an instant to acute violence.
Remarkably clear is the intense devotion of the pigeon handlers for their birds and the extraordinary role pigeons played in wars.
In vivid contrast, the author portrays the excitement shown for other birds, by bird watching tourists, the protagonist’s bread and butter, and the ultimate insensitivity shown to pigeons.
Symbolically, as pigeons always return home, so do Jews return to Israel.
Falya
All novels about Israel fascinate me. This one intrigued me because of the rhythm of each sentence, and therefore, kudos to the translator. The parallel stories intertwine and the narrative is not lost because of it, as in so many other novels using flashback technique. The ending was so poetic, so indicative of the lengths to which one must go to survive in a land that has a precarious topography, the joy of discovering love and unexpected friendship, the land of women alongside the men/boys they admire, the willingness to share and provide support - these stimulated my mind. Every character stood out for me, and I would love to divulge the ending, but that would spoil it for a reader. This book has a mystique that resonates. Hardship and love, and not a 'pat' love story at all - uniquely told, immersing the reader in every page, and lingering afterward.
I suppose you'd say I enjoyed this tale, where the battle is the background, the war between palestine and israel is not the centerpoint, and the reader is not embroiled in the brutality. It is the people who leap from the page.
I am reminded of Masha Hamilton's novels about the Middle East and her ability to evoke the essence of the land and the people, wshether Israeli or Arab.
A Pigeon and a Boy: A Novel
Mbon
This is the kind of book you want to read slowly, to savour every word, and long for it not to finish. Meir Shalev's beautifully crafted book, with its flowing, evocative language, masterfully translated by Evan Fallenberg, consists of two ingeniously interwoven tales of people a generation apart, linked by places and events. One is a first person narrative of an adult tour-guide yearning for affection and a place he can consider 'home', and the other a touching story of the love between two teenagers, whose main channel of communication is through the homing-pigeons they send back and forth for the Hagana, the underground movement struggling against British rule in pre-State Israel. Through the intertwined tales, artfully tied up in the final denouement, the reader subtly gains insight into the handling of homing-pigeons and the tense days leading up to the War of Independence. The slight suspension of credibility called for here and there in the book only serve to enrich the sensitive flow of a wonderful story. Not to be missed!
Andromajurus
This 2007 Israeli novel won several literary prizes and I can well understand why. It is a love story on many levels - the love between a man and a woman, the love of a country, and a love of the desire for a home. It is also the story of homing pigeons and I learned more than I ever thought I would know about their use throughout history as well as their care and feeding and importance to the Israelis during their 1948 war.

There are two interweaving stories here, one taking place in the present and told in the first person by an Israeli tour guide who meets up with an American who had once fought in the long-ago war and remembers a pigeon handler who was killed at the time. This stirs the Israeli guide's memories and slowly but surely he weaves in the story of "Baby" a young man from a Kibbutz who handled pigeons and the girl who loved him. But this was a long time ago, and the tour guide is currently dealing with an unhappy marriage, the death of his mother and a longing for a home of is own. I was completely entranced by the story he tells and the way it is told. It is his own personal story of course, but it is also the story of Israel itself and, for the first time in my life, I got a real sense of what it must be like to be an Israeli.

The book is only 311 pages long and I read it quite quickly, reading it in all my spare moments and thinking about it in between. The writing is simple and yet it invokes a mood that just pulled me into the time and the place of modern Israel as well as the Israel of 60 years ago. The pace moves more quickly as the book moves along, and as the story unfolds, more and more becomes clear and I was aware throughout that I was in the presence of a fine writer.
Ungall
This book was wonderful! Mr. Shalev has refined the art of excellent character development, with characters who inspire real empathy. You laugh when they laugh, cry when they cry, and grieve when they do too. Even the descriptions of the cars and travel routes was so good it placed you right in the passenger seat (or the roof rack of "Behemoth", as the case may be!) It is a gripping tale about life in the emerging state of Israel spanning two generations, complex family connections, joy, disappointment, tragedy and loss, leaving us with the always-present knowledge and hope that life goes on from generation to generation as we continue our ancestors' stories, which remains always part of us.

Like Amos Oz's book, "A Tale of Love and Darkness", (which I also highly recommend), this book leaves you knowing much more about people, even yourself, and about life in Israel before and after 1948.

It's a keeper, to read and reread as time goes by. I loved it!