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Download The Journey To The East ePub

by Hermann Hesse

Download The Journey To The East ePub
  • ISBN 0586089063
  • ISBN13 978-0586089064
  • Language English
  • Author Hermann Hesse
  • Publisher Paladin / Grafton Books; New Ed edition (1989)
  • Pages 96
  • Formats lrf mbr txt lrf
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Contemporary
  • Size ePub 1580 kb
  • Size Fb2 1757 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 112

2011 Reprint of 1957 English Translation. Full facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. "Journey to the East" is written from the point of view of a man who becomes a member of "The League", a timeless religious sect whose members include famous fictional and real characters, such as Plato, Mozart, Pythagoras, Paul Klee, Don Quixote, Tristram Shandy, Baudelaire, and the ferryman Vasudeva, a character from one of Hesse's earlier works, Siddhartha. A branch of the group goes on a pilgrimage to "the East" in search of the "ultimate Truth". The conclusion of the short novel is a stroke of Hesse's typical Eastern mysticism at its finest. Hermann Hesse was born in Calw in the Black Forest on July 2, 1877, and from an early age was obsessed with the mystery of existence and humanity's place in the Universe. The Journey to the East is Hesse's tale of inner pilgrimage, an allegory on human desire for enlightenment and the long road that must be traveled to that ultimate goal. Using remarkably clear and accessible language, the book brings together the experience and conclusions of many years of spiritual struggle.

Home Hermann Hesse The Journey to the East. Books by Hermann Hesse. I. It was my destiny to join in a great experience. Having had the good fortune to belong to the League, I was permitted to be a participant in a unique journey. What wonder it had at the time!

Home Hermann Hesse The Journey to the East. The journey to the east, . What wonder it had at the time! How radiant and comet-like it seemed, and how quickly it has been forgotten and allowed to fall into disrespute. For this reason, I have decided to attempt a short description of this fabulous journey, a journey the like of which had not been attempted since the days of Hugo and mad Roland.

In simple, mesmerizing prose, Hermann Hesse's Journey to the East tells of a journey both geographic and spiritual. The participants traverse both space and time, encountering Noah's Ark in Zurich and Don Quixote at In simple, mesmerizing prose, Hermann Hesse's Journey to the East tells of a journey both geographic and spiritual.

Home Hermann Hesse The Journey to the East. Our Journey to the East and our League, the basis of our community, has been the most important thing, indeed the only important thing in my life, compared with which my own individual life has appeared completely unimportant. And now that I want to hold fast to and describe this most important thing, or at least something of it, everything is only a mass of separate fragmentary pictures which has been reflected in something, and this something is myself, and this self, this mirror, whenever I have gazed into it, has proved to be nothing but the uppermost surface of a. Finally, at the top of the immense building, we arrived at a garret-storey, which smelled of paper and cardboard, and all along the walls for many hundreds of yards protruded cupboard-doors, backs of books and bundles of documents: a gigantic archive, a vast chancery. Nobody took any notice of us; everyone was silently occupied.

Journey to the East is a short novel by German author Hermann Hesse. It was first published in German in 1932 as "Die Morgenlandfahrt". This novel came directly after his biggest international success, Narcissus and Goldmund.

author: Hesse Hermann d. ate. Literature d. itle: The Journey To The East d. ype: Print - Paper d. ype: Book. citation: 1933 d. dentifier. other: 10003 d. origpath: 154 d. copyno: 1 d.

In simple, mesmerizing prose, Hermann Hesse tells of a journey both geographic and spiritual. and it was even more meaningful and profound than the first time when I was just starting out, fifty years ago, on my own journey.

Herman Hesse (1877-1962) was one of the most conscious spiritual seekers in his time . Leo disappears from the League in Book II, and with the passing of Leo, the League begins to have internal problems.

Herman Hesse (1877-1962) was one of the most conscious spiritual seekers in his time and one of the finest and most consistent European doves in an age of two world wars and an ethos of overt hawkishness and militarism. Was this what Hesse was doing in The Journey to the East? Hesse was much too subtle a thinker and wise a spiritual guide to slip into the tendency to romanticize the East and demonize the West. The East is a metaphor in this tract for the times for something much deeper and more substantive. The participants traverse both space and time, encountering Noah's Ark in Zurich and Don Quixote at Bremgarten. The pilgrims' ultimate destination is the East, the "Home of the Light," where they expect to find spiritual renewal

But I have had an experience, something has happened to me which I never expected-or no, did I not really expect it, did I not anticipate, hope for and really fear it? Yes, I did.

nge and improbable enough. I went to Seilergraben frequently, twenty times or more, at what I thought were favorable times, and often wandered past No. 69a, always with the thought, I shall try once more, and if there is nothing in it I shall not come again. Yet I went again and again, and the day before yesterday my wish was fulfilled. Oh, and what a fulfillment it was.

Talk about The Journey To The East


Ueledavi
A small but amazing book about a journey across time ... space ... ? Who really knows! I've read this book numerous times. Its maybe not his best novel, while I believe if you only know Hesse via Siddhartha than that's like only knowing Jewel from her dance album or Pat Boone from his heavy metal album, but it might be one of his most overtly spiritual. Maybe its not spiritual. It's hard to say. All his books, particularly the earlier ones, are firmly grounded in reality. That's what makes Siddhartha so good. It's spiritual but also realistic, away from the religious mumble jumble. Steppenwolf takes some liberties but still stays very grounded. Journey To The East just goes all the way with fantasy. If it has any downfall it's the fact that it is Hesse at his most abstract and there's no definitive answer to what it all means.

Having said that I'd like to see Neil Gaiman turn this into a movie script!
Ger
I bought this book because of my interest in servant leadership. The father of modern servant leadership, Robert K. Greenleaf was raised as a Methodist and became a Quaker in his adult life, but contrary to popular belief, his Aha moment on servant leadership did not come from Jesus, but rather from this obscure book by the German novelist Hermann Hesse, who is best known for Siddhartha and Steppenwolf. Written as a novel but autobiographical in nature, Hesse describes (spoiler alert ahead) a mythical expedition in search of the elusive “League.” On this trek, Hesse met a man named Leo who carried the trekkers’ luggage and did menial chores. Everyone loved the servant Leo, but when he disappeared, the expedition fell into disarray. After decades of anguish searching for Leo, Hesse found him—and discovered Leo was the leader of the League. The Big Idea was that Leo was a great leader all along, but the members of the expedition couldn’t see it. Once the author opened his eyes, the truth of servant leadership stared him in the face. That opened Robert K. Greenleaf’s eyes as well.
Heri
Whenever I face terror or pain and begin to crumble, I read this book. May it be the last book I ever read.
Hellmaster
A must if you really want to know where the term 'Servant Leader' orginated. Too often individuals believe then know what a servant leader is and how a servant leader should act. This original book that started the entire concept is a quick read.
Olwado
Just reread Journey to the East....and it was even more meaningful and profound than the first time when I was just starting out, fifty years ago, on my own journey.
Qudanilyr
Hermann Hesse wrote some of the most important novels and essays of the twentieth century. His primary literary work (part materialist protest, part spiritual quest) spanned almost half a century (1899-1943) and culminated in the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1946. He lived through the pain of World Wars I & II and looked outside Europe for alternative philosophies. He became a Swiss citizen in 1923 and lived in exile from his native Germany, in part because of his anti-war views. The problems that troubled Hesse then are still with us, and he is more popular today than he was in his own lifetime.

"Journey to the East," published in 1932 is the 'short version' of his spiritual philosophy ("The Glass Bead Game" is the long version). Both books draw deeply from Hesse's fascination with Indian philosophy. Both are immersed in the search for alternatives. "Journey to the East" is the geographical and spiritual journey taken by one man (League Brother H) with a group of like-minded, journeyers sometime after World War I. H says:

"It was my destiny to join in a great experience. Having had the good fortune to belong to the League, I was permitted to be a participant in a unique journey. What wonder it had at the time!"

The nature of the journey, its purpose, and even its outcome is a mystery -- Hesse's parable of spareness, about how we make choices and how we might live. The servant, Leo, says to H. early in the novel:

"The law of service. He who wishes to live long must serve, but he who wishes to rule does not live long."

"The Journey to the East" - like all of Hesse's work - offers another way to think about our lives and live(!) in a world ever-maddened by wars, greed, and inattention. The journey is the Tao of Hesse, one might say, a novel part parable.
Dianantrius
A quest for one's self, a journey into the abyss of the soul, the alienation and loss of belief on the way, the tragic realization. The real self has always been there. It was me to stop listening to him
Not light reading. I found it difficult to "get into" the story, but the message is very compelling and thought provocative. I read it because of the frequent references to it in the "servant leadership" leadership and the reputation of H. Hesse