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Download An Embarrassment of Riches ePub

by James Howard Kunstler

Download An Embarrassment of Riches ePub
  • ISBN 0812584988
  • ISBN13 978-0812584981
  • Language English
  • Author James Howard Kunstler
  • Publisher Tor Books; (1st,1985) edition (May 1, 1988)
  • Formats lit lrf rtf txt
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Contemporary
  • Size ePub 1172 kb
  • Size Fb2 1931 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 221


Other author's books: The Harrows of Spring. An Embarrassment of Riches. World Made by Hand: A Novel.

No portion of this book may be reproduced in any fashion, print, facsimile, or electronic, or by any method yet to be developed, without the express written permission of the publisher. Published in the United States of America. e-book ISBN 978-1-935212-39-3. 2011 Digital reprint published by. Prospecta Press. Other author's books: The Harrows of Spring.

An Embarrassment of Riches. Tour de force historical comedy (1803) about two bumbling botonists sent into the southern wilderness by Thomas Jefferson to look for something that isn’t there. James Howard Kunstler is the author of many books including (non-fiction) The Geography of Nowhere, The City in Mind: Notes on the Urban Condition, Home from Nowhere, The Long Emergency, and Too Much Magic: Wishful Thinking, Technology and the Fate of the Nation. His novels include World Made By Hand, The Witch of Hebron, Maggie Darling - A Modern Romance, The Halloween Ball, an Embarrassment of Riches, and many others.

In the spring of 1803, William Walker, a Botanist of renown and friend of the President, along with his nephew, an aspiring artist, are invited to dinner.

James Howard Kunstler. A picaresque novel of the American West in 1803. An historical comedy about two bumbling botanists sent into the southern wilderness by Thomas Jefferson to look for something that isn't there. A novel in the spirit of Lewis and Clark (who make cameo appearences). Replete with wild Indians, river pirates, the kidnapped son of King Louis XVI, the lost colony of Roanoke, and much more. A non-stop romp full of life and humor and the sensibility of early America. We arrived there to find several more Indians in vicious assault upon Bilbo, whilst three were required merely to hold back the snarling, snapping, slavering Neddy, and two clutched Uncle. We arrived there to find several more Indians in vicious assault upon Bilbo, whilst three were required merely to hold back the snarling, snapping, slavering Neddy, and two clutched Uncle sailants belabored him with the ferocity of famished wildcats, tearing his clothing away in shreds and gnawing the tips of his fingers amid shrieks and squirts of blood and clouds of dust as they thrashed upon the forest floor.

An Embarrassment of Riches book. by. Kunstler, James Howard. Originally published: Garden City, . Dial/Doubleday, 1985. No table of contents.

by James Howard Kunstler. Books related to An Embarrassment of Riches. You are in the United States store. Complete Works of Jack London (Delphi Classics). Lord Tony's Wife (Mobi Classics). James Howard Kunstler. An historical comedy about two bumbling botanists sent into the southern wilderness by Thomas Jefferson to look for something that isn't there

An Embarrassment of Riches. Replete with wild Indians river pirates the kidnapped son of King Louis XVI the lost colony of Roanoke and much more.

Talk about An Embarrassment of Riches


Gir
A well-known botanist and his nephew are invited to a meeting with President Thomas Jefferson, a friend of the botanists. The president wants to tap his old friend for an expedition into the wilderness, with the object of finding a chimerical creature that might correspond to a skeleton recently obtained by the president. What ensues is a trip down the Ohio and Tennessee Rivers, as well as other waterways and land passages, encountering various Native Americans (both hostile and friendly), river town swindlers and blackguards, and a number of strange characters and arrangements. A (slightly) lighter side of Conrad’s Congo River in “The Heart of Darkness” comes to mind, in a trip that grows stranger and stranger as their distance from an under-construction Washington DC and White House increases.

Along the way, there is some interesting commentary embedded in the story. At one point, the travelers are exchanging their fantasies about the future USA with a plantation owner who produces hemp with the help of numerous slaves. The plantation owner’s vision of the future USA doesn’t line up with the way he runs his own plantation, and one of our intrepid explorers later predicts that slavery will be abolished, he responds by agreeing that the practice of slavery is morally insupportable in the long view; when asked who will then till his hemp fields, he replies that perhaps he will no longer be in the business of growing it.

Ultimately, the adventurers discover that the ideas and ways of living they bring with them into the wilderness are not an unalloyed good for every person and every creature they come into contact with. Without introducing any spoilers, this insight finally sinks in toward the end of their travels, making for an interesting conclusion.

The narrative imitates the tone I would imagine an early 19th century natural historian would exhibit in a daily travel journal. I ultimately found this quaintly amusing, but it took some getting used to. Also, although events progress quickly enough, for a brief time following the White House meeting, the novelty bogs down just a bit (somehow events are not always that interesting), and the less-engaged reader might be lured away before things really get going. This is one of those books that gets better as it goes, and the last 2/3 of the book is definitely the best part. A little patience early on will be rewarded.

Although there are a few scenes with some graphic violence and one or two short (but amusingly outrageous) sexual "encounters," the primary tone seems to be mildly amused and adventuresome, and the author knows how to tell a story, even though I believe this is one of his early (perhaps his first?) work. I read the entire book over a two-day period with little difficulty, and will no doubt explore other works by this author.
Bad Sunny
An Embarrassment of Riches ISBN9781935212393, Prospecta Press, an e-book by James Howard Kunstler is a tongue-in-cheek history of a search for a beast based upon a Thomas Jefferson statement in "Notes of the State of Virginia".
In the spring of 1803, William Walker, a Botanist of renown and friend of the President, along with his nephew, an aspiring artist, are invited to dinner. The invitation is to inform them of, and enlist their endeavors to find, the giant sloth rumored to exist prowling the wilds of the American frontier somewhere in the area between the boundaries of the eastern states and the Ohio/Tennessee and Mississippi Rivers. These intrepid explorers set forth upon their journey and have encounters with river pirates, Indians of several tribes, a displaced French nobleman, his beautiful wife and young ward of unusual identity in a magnificent plantation in an unbelievable setting, a mysterious `woodsman' and even members of the `Lost Colony of Virginia'. Lewis and Clark also are encountered several times.
Although a novel, this quasi history in many ways follows a protocol of formality more in line with a history book; e.g. the Latin names of plants and some animals always are included as are even end-notes detailing the fate of some of the persons involved in the story and the chronological life of Samuel Walker.
For many readers, the author's manner of presentation and fanciful descriptions of the characters and their activity no doubt will be enjoyed. Unfortunately, although I found the author's fertile imagination most commendable and much of the material a `different' offering, the overall exposition was not my `my cup of tea'. Reviewed by John H. Manhold, award winning fiction/non-fiction author.
Dorizius
In the manner of Gulliver's travels, we follow the adventures and misadventures of a young man and his elderly botanist uncle as they traverse the wilds of Ohio and Tennessee on a mission for President Jefferson. Our intrepid travelers meet with everything from pirates to plantation owners, judges to ruffians, and savages both Cree and Kentuckian,

There are some instances of graphic violence, such as a depiction of a trading post which has been burned to the ground and all inhabitants gruesomely slaughtered, with no detail spared. But there is an abundance of subtle humor as well, including Uncle Walker's preoccupation with the numerous 'undiscovered' botanical species they encounter on their travels.

Although first published in 1985, Kunstler's writing has the flavor of the 1800s: "In the year 1803, our nation's capital was less a city than an idea for a city. Upon a hill at one end stood the one-story brick monstrosity built for the deliberations of Congress. It was dubbed 'the Oven' by those condemned to sit in it through the hellish Potomac summer. At the other end of the Columbian District lay Georgetown, described by Abigail Adams as 'a dirty little hole."

Some readers may find this style off-putting. The book is rather long, in my opinion, more of a novel to be savored a bit at a time than voraciously consumed in one sitting.
Abandoned Electrical
I decided not to the finish this book. Not that it's horrific writing. The author does have talent. The plot line is a gold mine as well. An uncle and nephew, turned loose in the wilderness to chart animal species? And ordered to do so by President Jefferson? For me, it was a no-brainer and I jumped right in. However, the thing began to feel like a fairy tale and hard to take serious. Also the dialogue had an old testament feel. Maybe right for the period but tiresome after a while. The saving grace are the characters. They tend to pop up with regularity and leave a mark even if some of their exploits are fanciful. However, it isn't enough to save this one. I suppose if you were in a waiting room for five hours, you could make do with this book. Then again, you could take a nap.