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Download Anything Goes ePub

by Madison Smartt Bell

Download Anything Goes ePub
  • ISBN 0375421254
  • ISBN13 978-0375421259
  • Language English
  • Author Madison Smartt Bell
  • Publisher Pantheon; 1 edition (June 25, 2002)
  • Pages 320
  • Formats azw doc mobi lrf
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Contemporary
  • Size ePub 1425 kb
  • Size Fb2 1433 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 691

The only taste of life Jesse has known in his twenty years is bitter: his mother disappeared before he could talk, his father never got over being left, and Jesse’s presence seems only to kindle his father’s anger. Jesse’s talent is for music, which has given him a livelihood and a home as a bass player in a bar band called Anything Goes. Band life offers the opportunity for the dregs of experience (hangovers, mildewed hotel rooms), and the antics of his band mates (all of them older than he is; some of them wiser, some not) offer more schooling in hard knocks. Anything Goes tells Jesse’s story over the course of a year, during which he finds his life slowly being tempered by the unexpected: by a dad who wants to make up and be part of Jesse’s life; by a female lead singer who suddenly makes the band sound a lot better than they have any right to be; and by the confidence Jesse begins to feel in his own musical talent.A complete departure from the sweeping historical vision of Madison Smartt Bell’s Haitian novels and the gritty cynicism of his intense urban dramas, Anything Goes confirms Bell as one of the most versatile, most gifted, most surprising novelists of his generation.

Madison Smartt Bell (born August 1, 1957 Nashville, Tennessee) is an American novelist. He is known for his trilogy of novels about Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian Revolution, published 1995–2004.

Madison Smartt Bell (born August 1, 1957 Nashville, Tennessee) is an American novelist. Raised in Nashville, Tennessee, Madison Smartt Bell lived in New York City, and London before settling in Baltimore, Maryland.

That's the same feeling the reader gets early on about Madison Smartt Bell in "Anything Goes," his 13th book of fiction. Bell has the mojo, he can flat- out play, and the tunefulness and life-knowledge and honest emotion all come ringing off the page. The question, if you've got the mojo, is what to do with it. "Willard," the con-man guitarist with the sweet touch, slides through life, picking up women and gambling debts in big piles, and doing pretty much whatever he wants.

Anything Goes - Madison Smartt Bell & Wyn Cooper. Открывайте новую музыку каждый день. Лента с персональными рекомендациями и музыкальными новинками, радио, подборки на любой вкус, удобное управление своей коллекцией. Миллионы композиций бесплатно и в хорошем качестве. He is best known for his trilogy of novels about Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian Revolution, including All Souls' Rising, which was a finalist for the 1995 National Book Award and the 1996 PEN/Faulkner Award. It also won the 1996 Anisfield-Wolf Award for the best book of the year dealing with matters of race.

Ten tales of misfits in big cities and lonely backwaters, striving to free themselves from traps of their own making In each of Bell's ten stories, characters struggle through trying times, captives of their own bad decisions or plain bad luck. In "Black and Tan," a farmer's fortitude after the tragic death of his family leads him to become a savior of delinquent boys. When Julie skips school and sets off with her best friend and some local boys for a camping trip in the desert, she finds herself the target of unwanted, drug-fueled sexual attention.

Madison Smartt Bell is a critically acclaimed writer of more than a dozen novels and story collections, as well .

Madison Smartt Bell is a critically acclaimed writer of more than a dozen novels and story collections, as well a. .Spirituality and the allure of violence are recurring themes in Madison Smartt Bell’s work, going back at least as far as his deliberately hypnotic 1991 nov. pirituality and the allure of violence are recurring themes in Madison Smartt Bell’s work, going back at least as far as his deliberately hypnotic 1991 nov. adison Smartt Bell.

The only taste of life Jesse has known in his twenty years is bitter: his mother disappeared before he could talk, his father never got over being left, and Jesse s presence seems only to kindle his father s anger. Jesse s talent is for music, which has given him a livelihood and a home as a bass player in a bar band called Anything Goes.

Madison Smartt Bell is the author of twelve previous works of fiction, including Master of the Crossroads; All Souls’ Rising (a National Book Award finalist); Save Me, Joe Louis; Dr. Sleep; and Soldier’s Joy. He lives in Baltimore, Maryland. Библиографические данные. Pantheon Books, 2002. Владелец оригинала: Мичиганский университет.

by. Bell, Madison Smartt. urn:acs6:anythinggoes00bell:pdf:eb6-2d4b5faf0c41 urn:acs6:anythinggoes00bell:epub:85a-16ccdb8a8a29 urn:oclc:record:1028033395.

Talk about Anything Goes


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If you have ever dreamt about being in a band, then this book is for you. I only picked it up because the litmus test I use for books is when the first paragraph hooks me in, I get it. As I dug deeper into this novel, I realized it was written by a dude, which, well, normally my books are about women, by women and in general, for women. So it was intriguing to get a young man's perspective, thoughts and the adventures he experienced first hand. I think we all know that now, when we read books, the more a person includes what the main character is actually thinking, in this case, hilarious stuff that he held back from saying, that the better and quicker the read is...Now, we just need to make a movie. Will SOMEONE PLEASE MAKE THIS INTO A MOVIE? PLU LEEESE!!!!!!!! If I had the money and time I would...but...I don't. Also, really, I am going to get all of this author's book and devour them if they are written anything like this one. The ending is PERFECT.
Cordanius
Filled with themes of identity, family, and maturity, Bell's thirteen book takes place over a year, following a Nashville-based cover band as they travel down the eastern seaboard and up into Vermont, playing roadhouses a few weeks at a time. Jesse is their bassist, and for him, the ritual of being on the road creates a sense of security and family, since his mother abandoned him soon after birth, and his alcoholic father beat him all through childhood. Jesse is happy to follow the warm weather around, playing music, scoring occasional women, and then hanging out at band leader (and surrogate father figure) Perry's farm during the off-season.
This steady existence is skewed somewhat when Jesse's father shows up clean and sober, and looking for reconciliation. Part of this involves introducing him to a neighbor whose singing knocks his socks off. Soon enough, she's in the band, and they have great and greater success, all while Jesse struggles to identify his feelings for her and hers for him. Nothing earth-shattering happens in the book, but the relationships and issues are all captivating and feel true to life. Jesse 's mother was a Melungeon (a dark mysterious Appalachian people whose origins are unknown) and the band's drummer is black, allowing Bell to touch on racial identity issues here and there as the band drifts though white-trash venues all through the South. The towns, bars, and motels all spring from the page as real places, with history and grit to them.
Over the course of the year's cycle, Jesse comes to terms with his past, his heritage, and his future in a very non-soap opera way. This book could have easily drifted into sappiness (think Oprahish) and never quite does. The last portions get a touch heavy-handed, but never so much as to spoil the easygoing tone of the book. Musicians may especially enjoy this book as there is a great deal of language attempting to describe how Jesse feels about hearing and playing music, and how it infects his whole being. One last note, the first chapter originally appeared as a short story in the "It's Only Rock And Roll" anthology.
Wiliniett
This book is my first exposure to Madison Smartt Bell, and I'm impressed. The book begins with a debauched scene that, frankly, was too much for me, but I persevered. And as I persevered, so did the main character, a 20-year-old who's playing bass guitar with a cover band. That character (Jesse) tells about the ups and downs of a musical life on the road, while he's also searching for a higher beauty in his life and a deeper understanding of his past.

I am the producer of a music festival, so I have a pretty good understanding of musicians, even though I'm not a performer. And I can say that the depictions in this book ring true about the love that most musicians have for what they're playing, what they're learning from others, and what they hope to create on their own. When you join those strong elements of the book with a young man's "coming of age" saga, it's a very satisfying combination.
Zicelik
"Anything Goes" drifts along, raveling out the thread of its story in a leisurely style that's at once engaging and attractive. Taking place over a year and in many locales, "Anything Goes" introduces us to Jesse, a disaffected and somewhat bitter young man traveling through his life as a member of a band called...you guessed it...Anything Goes. As a band name, the title [is bad].... But as a theme for the novel it works quite well.
Jesse, abandoned as a child by his mother and physically abused by his father, has become a man who doesn't expect good things from the world. As he matures throughout the pages of this book, he discovers himself in ways that are both subtle and poignant. This is a quiet story that stays with you long after you've read it...and I recommend giving it a read!
Thordibandis
I found this one very readable--the prose flowed right along. The handling here and there of racial issues was interesting, though I was disappointed to see another kind, decent, one-dimensional "magical black friend" helping out a white character at the center, such a typical American literary and cinematic device. But the protagonist isn't fully white, which is an interesting twist, but not one that really ends up going anywhere. Still, those quibbles aside, the movement of Jesse away from his father's abuse toward autonomy, and apparently toward forgiveness of his father, was very effective and honest. Nearly everything in this novel felt very real, and it taught me some things about making music too.