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by David Davis,Chris Megson,Jenny Stevens,Edward Bond

Download Saved (Student Editions) ePub
  • ISBN 140810010X
  • ISBN13 978-1408100103
  • Language English
  • Author David Davis,Chris Megson,Jenny Stevens,Edward Bond
  • Publisher Methuen Drama (May 23, 2009)
  • Pages 224
  • Formats lit lrf doc azw
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Dramas and Plays
  • Size ePub 1582 kb
  • Size Fb2 1521 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 629

Described by Edward Bond as 'almost irresponsibly optimistic', Saved is a play set in London in the sixties and reflects a time of social change. Its subject is the cultural poverty and frustration of a generation of young people on the dole and living on council estates. The play was first staged privately in November 1965 at the Royal Court Theatre for members of the English Stage Society at a time when plays were still censored. With its scenes of violence, including the stoning of a baby in its pram, Saved became a notorious play and a cause célèbre. It has since had a profound influence on a whole new generation of writers who emerged in the 1990s.

Commentary and notes by David Davis.


by. Frank Wedekind (Author). ISBN-13: 978-1408140895.

ISBN-13: 978-0713683264.

The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

ISBN-13: 978-0413516206. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

ISBN-13: 978-1408103852.

Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Described by Edward Bond as 'almost irresponsibly optimistic', Saved is a play set in London in the sixties and reflects a time of social change. Its subject is the cultural poverty and frustration of a generation of young people on the dole and living on council estates. The play was first staged privately in November 1965 at the Royal Court Theatre for members of the English Stage Society at a time when plays were still censored. Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Edward Bond and the Dramatic Child, Edward Bond's Plays for Young People, London, Trentham Books, 2005.

The Chair Plays: Have I None, The Under Room and Chair (2012). Edward Bond and the Dramatic Child, Edward Bond's Plays for Young People, London, Trentham Books, 2005. Something of Myself" (2004), in David Davis (e. : Edward Bond and the Dramatic Child, Edward Bond's Plays for Young People, London, Trentham Books, 2005.

Published April 5th 2013 by Methuen Drama.

ISBN: 140810010X (ISBN13: 9781408100103). Published April 5th 2013 by Methuen Drama.

Homicide in American Fiction, 1798–1860. David Davis,Chris Saraceno. The Theory of 5. Read. One fee. Stacks of books.

Talk about Saved (Student Editions)


Thordibandis
I have rarely acquired and read a book where I had to think more, and where I had to fill as many of its blank pages with my own commentary. This play, one of Edward Bond's earliest and probably his most notorious play, is a starkly horrific, and horrifically funny, inside view of how and why people can be paralyzed and destroyed by lives "lived" in English urban slums. This play superficially resembles the works of the "Angry Young Men" of the mid-1950s-early 1960s, though it is far darker and more weighted with thought. David Davis, a theatre academic, offers considerable, though insightful, commentary into the key terms and processes of Bond's own dramatic ideology, how his theatre differs from that of Brecht and Stanislavski, and how the three men provide different guidelines for the art of acting. Bond's guideline to the theatre, briefly, is to enable the actors, and through them the audience, to rediscover their basic humanity, and their "radical innocence", by exposing and casting aside the human-killing ideologies of state-work-religion-family-power-violence that keep men and women self-deluded, ignorant, and helpless. You do not have to buy every inch of Bond's own rather complex ideology-ironic, since Davis writes that Bond is intent on killing the power "ideology" has to pervert our humanity into avenues of dumb indifference, nihilistic violence, and narcissistic consumerism-to fully enjoy this great play. All this being said, and after having thought about what I have written in this review so far, I would advise all directors and actors who wish to stage this play to avoid reading-or following lockstep-the extended interpretive commentary by Davis that precedes and follows this play. Much of the ideology that Davis (or Bond) propounds in this long exposition, is either overly cumbersome luggage for any active staging of this play, or simply ludicrous and even despotic, a sort of aesthetic neo-Stalinism that if followed to the letter enchains inspiring staging into an iron vest. The best writer, be it in poetry, prose or drama, writes less, not more to explain himself/herself to the audience. Bond's "authentic" Marxism-as-drama is, as I reconsider what I have read here, is no more correct than Brecht's own, which Davis takes care to defame, both as ideology and as evocative of the sort of man Brecht was. His understanding, and dismissal, of Stanislavski, and his own acting techniques, as a mere pawn for Stalinism is simply ridiculous.
Coiron
Very intense and heavy subject matter, it's a pretty deep read but a hard read if you're faint-of-heart.
Bad Sunny
Bought for college class
Riavay
After years of hearing about the famous scene in Saved, and wanting to read it, and maybe even see it, I finally got to do the former, and am here to pass on that this is a remarkable play, not to be missed if it is being presented near you, and is also a great read-who likes working their Cockney dialect?-and has a wallop of a core to boot.
Very much an ensemble story, Saved does have a main character, but it's scenes are mostly two-person short/quick dialogues, full of angst and boredom. The scene of infanticide is in the middle and serves as the apex of the nothingness that embodies the lives of these post-war, post-angry young man English, who's pursuits are none, other than occasional work, a night out, eating...you know, the basicness that allows for cruelty, when no valuable purpose is apparent.
What makes Saved remarkable though is Len, the central character, who's constant interest and seemingly clueless tenacity turns out to be it's moral core that resounds with a curiosity and compassion that make for a real courageous and bold vision of modern life.
Len's involvement in the family, his presence at their home, his dogged attachment to Pam, his lone interest in the baby, his questioning of Fred, his excitment at Mary and willingness to bond with Harry all make for a picture of hope and wonder in the midst of so much hatred, fear, nihilism, desperation, ignorance, boredom.
A true classic. Highly recommended. Needs to be seen to be truly appreciated.
Ballardana
Yesterday night, I saw the play "Saved", by Edward Bond, with 2 friends of mine. It was translated in Greek, but I'm sure it doesn't lose anything of the original English text in the translation, which was excellent. The play lasted a little more than 3 hours, which in itself was exhausting. So, one first comment is that, while "Saved" is good writing, & the characters come alive...still, why 3 hours? Definitely overlong, in my opinion.
"Saved" is basically the story of a family. A father & mother, who hate each other & won't even address each other by name, but still live in the same house. Their daughter, who is a very sick young woman, maybe suffers from bipolar disorder & clearly has severe psychological problems. This woman, Pam, forms a relationship with a young man (Len) who seems kind of a loser, but is kind & caring nontheless. In the beginning, they promise that they'll be different from Pam's parents...but of course, this promise soon, too soon, is forgotten. Still, Len is the only person that stands by Pam, when she's most in need, & even after she falls desperately in love with another man, who couldn't care less about her.
The rest of the story I won't reveal. "Saved" is basically the story of extreme unhappiness in one family, a family that choses silence & sometimes loud, violent fights over talking & trying to communicate. They don't know HOW to communicate, all they know is shouting, hating, throwing things & crying. This is a very sad (but powerful) play, very violent at parts, which is the reason for the 3 stars: I can understand & appreciate characters with problems. But there's one scene which has to do with a baby, which broke my heart while I was watching it, & which I can't seem to get over. I know it is a powerful scene, & I know that many people might argue that it's the most meaningful scene in the play. But I just found it too cruel to be meaningful.