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Download Meaning of Recognition: New Essays 2001 - 2005 ePub

by Clive James

Download Meaning of Recognition: New Essays 2001 - 2005 ePub
  • ISBN 033044025X
  • ISBN13 978-0330440257
  • Language English
  • Author Clive James
  • Publisher Trans-Atlantic Publications, Inc. (December 31, 2005)
  • Pages 383
  • Formats txt lit azw docx
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Essays and Correspondence
  • Size ePub 1290 kb
  • Size Fb2 1877 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 353

Literary critic, cultural commentator, TV personality, journalist, poet, political analyst, satirist and Formula One fan: Clive James is a man (and master) of many talents, and the essays collected here are testament to that fact. Whether discussing Bing Crosby, Bruno Schulz or Shakespeare, he manages to prioritize style and substance simultaneously, his tone never less than pitch-perfect, his argument always considered. With each phrase carefully crafted and each piece offering cause for thought, the resulting volumewhich takes the reader from London to Bali, theatre to library, from pre-election campaigning to sitting in front of the TV at home, watching The Sopranos and The West Wingis remarkable not only for its range and insight, but also its intimacy and honesty. A contemporary everyman, James is also unmistakably himself, and The Meaning of Recognition shows him at his witty, learnedand heartfeltbest.

Clive James is an Australian who has long made the United Kingdom his base of operations as . .It is a collection of about thirty essays James wrote between 2001 and 2005.

Clive James is an Australian who has long made the United Kingdom his base of operations as . The subjects are quite diverse, including Alexander Pushkin, Bruno Schulz, Primo Levi, Isaiah Berlin, the television series "The West Wing" and "The Sopranos", Australian poetry, Bing Crosby, Sarah Raphael, and Formula One racing (I skipped that essay). Despite that eclecticism, there are several themes that recur from time to time.

The Meaning of Recognition book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Meaning of Recognition: New Essays 2001-2005 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Meaning of Recognition. Polanski and the Pianist. Fantasy in the West Wing. There is a difference between celebrity and recognition

The Meaning of Recognition. There is a difference between celebrity and recognition. Celebrities are recognized in the street, but usually because of who they are, or who they are supposed to be. To achieve recognition, however, is to be recognized in a different way.

Are you sure you want to remove MEANING OF RECOGNITION: NEW ESSAYS, 2001-2005.

Meaning of recognition: new essays, 2001-2005. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove MEANING OF RECOGNITION: NEW ESSAYS, 2001-2005. from your list? Meaning of recognition: new essays, 2001-2005. Published by PICADOR in LONDON. Written in Undetermined. Internet Archive Wishlist.

Home Clive James The Meaning of Recognition. The Meaning of Recognition, . The first and last pieces in this book are concerned with the difference between celebrity and recognition.

Items related to Meaning of Recognition: New Essays 2001 - 2005. Clive James is the author of more than twenty books. As well as essays, verse and novels, he has published literary and television criticism, travel writing, and three volumes of autobiography. Clive James Meaning of Recognition: New Essays 2001 - 2005. ISBN 13: 9780330440257. Meaning of Recognition: New Essays 2001 - 2005.

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Clive James is the author of more than twenty books. Country of Publication.

The Meaning of Recognition: New Essays 2001-2005. Learn More at LibraryThing

The Meaning of Recognition: New Essays 2001-2005. ISBN 9780330440295 (978-0-330-44029-5) Softcover, Picador Australia, 2005. The metropolitan critic. Learn More at LibraryThing. clive James at LibraryThing. New Essays 2001-2005.

The Meaning of Recognition : New Essays, 2001-2005. In this collection of essays, to mark the millennium, James discusses a wide range of differing and eclectic topics from Bing Crosby, Bruno Schulz and Shakespeare to London and Bali, theatre, libraries, electioneering and television.

Talk about Meaning of Recognition: New Essays 2001 - 2005


Obong
Clive James is an Australian who has long made the United Kingdom his base of operations as a . . . precisely what? -- "cultural critic" might be the most apt. He comments - in print and on radio and television - on literature, film, the stage, television, just about every form of media. He also is politically attuned and a champion of liberal democracy. Finally, he is a poet. I have never read any of his poetry, so I can't give you an opinion on its merits, but in his other roles James is usually incisive and witty and well worth reading.

Having been enamored with James's "Cultural Amnesia" (one of the ten best books I read in 2009), I bought THE MEANING OF RECOGNITION when I stumbled across it somewhere. It is a collection of about thirty essays James wrote between 2001 and 2005. The subjects are quite diverse, including Alexander Pushkin, Bruno Schulz, Primo Levi, Isaiah Berlin, the television series "The West Wing" and "The Sopranos", Australian poetry, Bing Crosby, Sarah Raphael, and Formula One racing (I skipped that essay).

Despite that eclecticism, there are several themes that recur from time to time. One has to do with the cult of celebrity that plagues Western "culture", and its opposite, which James tabs "recognition", where you are known "for what you have done, and quite often the person who knows what you have done has no idea of what you look like." Another has to do with the fact that "the mass-psychotic passion for celebrity", at bottom, is "one of the luxurious diseases" of Western liberal democracy, where standards of taste or spiritual unity cannot be mandated.

James does have his weaknesses. First, he tends to be verbose. In almost every essay, he could have made his point(s) in half the words, but he can't resist making a point multiple times if he sees multiple clever ways of doing so. Panache trumps efficiency. Second, the book is not entirely free of claptrap or pretentious nattering. But such instances are more than offset by the plenitude of sharp, oft-idiosyncratic observations.

The epigraph to the book is "No fixed idea except to avoid fixed ideas", from Robert Musil. As James points out repeatedly, those fixed ideas are as likely to come from the "left" as from the "right". For either side, information is hard to come by, "especially if your ears [are] stopped because your mouth [is] permanently wide open."

One subject on which James's writing is fresh and stimulating is the Palestinian/Israeli quagmire. He begins an essay entitled "The University of the Holocaust" (a mythical institution at which most Arabs have never studied) as follows:

"For the Israelis, anti-Semitism is merely a nightmare. For the Palestinians, it's a catastrophe. If you believe, as I do, that the Palestinians' cause is just nothing could be more depressing than to hear them spout the very stuff that guarantees they will never get an even break."

In other words, the state of Israel is an historical fait accompli, which Arabs and, in particular, Palestinians need to recognize and accept. As long as extremists from Hezbollah and Hamas proclaim the desirability of killing any and every Jew (unlike the situation with Israel, where "no Israeli government, however keen on reprisals against terror, has yet proclaimed the desirability of killing any Arab it can reach") the Palestinians have no chance to achieve justice.

In virtually every essay James goes off-road, so to speak, and most of the time it is rewarding to follow him.
Mettiarrb
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Whitemaster
Clive James is an expatriate Australian who travelled to Britian as a young man and has made a career as a writer and columnist. These are a collection of essays and talks that he has created in the last few years.

James combines the ability to be extremely funny with being highly intelligent. Some of the essays are gems and laugh out loud, especially the last. His essays on the television programs West Wing and the Sopranos are both insightfull and a delight to read.

The book also reflects James drift to the right. He is a person who sees himself as a social democrat but he is clearly becoming impatient with do goodist leftism or simple ideological positions. The interesting thing is his impression of Australia. James left at a time when a large number of talented people in the arts left thinking Australia a backwater. Now he thinks about it differently. Australia of course has changed in the forty or so years since he left but there is an acknowledgement of the fact that the backwater tag perhaps missed something. That is that Australia is one of the oldest and best functioning democracies around. It has a spirit of egalaterianism which perhaps characterises it. His essays on Britian suggest a gentle decay. London a city with a dreadful subway system strange functionalist white elephants like the Millenium Dome. Compared to this was Sydney at the height of its glory during the olympics. Of course this simply could be a bit of grovelling hoping to push up the Australian sales. Regardless the essays are not only the product of one of the most intelligent cultured minds going around but they are some of the funniest going around as well.