derrierloisirs.fr
» » Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Stories (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics)

Download Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Stories (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics) ePub

by Algernon Blackwood

Download Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Stories (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics) ePub
  • ISBN 0142180157
  • ISBN13 978-0142180150
  • Language English
  • Author Algernon Blackwood
  • Publisher Penguin Classics; F First Paperback Edition Used edition (August 27, 2002)
  • Pages 374
  • Formats txt rtf mbr lrf
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Genre Fiction
  • Size ePub 1824 kb
  • Size Fb2 1570 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 142

By turns bizarre, unsettling, spooky, and sublime, Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Stories showcases nine incomparable stories from master conjuror Algernon Blackwood. Evoking the uncanny spiritual forces of Nature, Blackwood's writings all tread the nebulous borderland between fantasy, awe, wonder, and horror. Here Blackwood displays his best and most disturbing work-including "The Willows," which Lovecraft singled out as "the single finest weird tale in literature"; "The Wendigo"; "The Insanity of Jones"; and "Sand."For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

By turns bizarre, unsettling, spooky, and sublime, Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Stories showcases nine incomparable stories from master conjuror Algernon Blackwood. Evoking the uncanny spiritual forces of Nature.

By turns bizarre, unsettling, spooky, and sublime, Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Stories showcases nine incomparable stories from master conjuror Algernon Blackwood. Here Blackwood displays his best and most disturbing work-including "The Willows," which Lovecraft singled out as "the single finest weird tale in literature"; "The Wendigo"; "The Insanity of Jones"; and "Sand.

Penguin twentieth-century classics. Ancient sorceries and other strange tales. Algernon Henry Blackwood was born in 1869 in Shooter’s Hill, Kent. Blackwood countered the strict religiosity of his early up-bringing by reading Buddhist tracts; he remained drawn to Eastern mysticism, theosophy, and occultism for his entire life. Trips to Canada and Switzerland nurtured a permanent devotion to nature.

Twentieth-Century Stories. Post-reading activities. Understanding the story. picking on him and the other Gordons. 28 The teacher defends himself by saying that the boys have a history of stealing. 29 Wood’s (the boy who has been brought to the front of the class).

By turns bizarre, unsettling, spooky, and sublime, Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Stories showcases nine incomparable stories from master conjuror Algernon Blackwood

By turns bizarre, unsettling, spooky, and sublime, Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Stories showcases nine incomparable stories from master conjuror Algernon Blackwood. Prices, promotions, styles and availability may vary by store & online. See our price match guarantee. See how a store is chosen for you.

Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Stories (2002); selected, introduced, and notes by S. T. Joshi; selections from previous Blackwood collections. Algernon Blackwood's Canadian Tales of Terror (2004); selected, introduced, with notes by John Robert Colombo; eight stories of special Canadian interest plus information on the author's years in Canada. This list of all Blackwood's known Weird Fiction stories appears by date of first publication, or where untraceable, by date appearing in a collection: Title. Earliest known date of appearance.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Stories by. .

Here Blackwood displays his best and most disturbing work-including "The Willows," which Lovecraft singled out as "the single finest weird tale in literature"; "The Wendigo"; "The Insanity of Jones"; and "Sand. Read full description. See details and exclusions. I picked up this collection of Blackwood's stories in desperate need of some short fiction, preferably of a speculative bent. Blackwood did not disappoint. Penguin Publishing Group. Although I was never terrified out of my mind (my cosy nook in our sitting room prevented that) I can definitely say that Blackwood's stories are a cut above most supernatural tales.

Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Tales by Algernon Blackwood. Courtesy Penguin Classics

Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Tales by Algernon Blackwood. With reoccurring elements like the cursed book called the Necronomicon and the squid-like monster Cthulhu, his work is a complete world unto itself, his sense of evil something that teeters just out of the reach of our minds to comprehend. Courtesy Penguin Classics. The White People and Other Weird Stories by Arthur Machen. The Welsh writer Arthur Machen turns the world upside down in stories like The White People, in which a fey race of changelings is conjured by a young girl’s diary.

Talk about Ancient Sorceries and Other Weird Stories (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics)


Vinainl
I can't help but wonder if the reason Algernon Blackwood lacks the kind of name recognition H.P. Lovecraft has today is due to the difference in where they root their horror. Both were clearly masters of the weird tale, but Lovecraft (when he wasn't cultivating terror based on personal degeneration) located his bleak and cosmic horrors at great distances of either time or space. Blackwood, on the other hand, sees the same impersonal force as something that constantly surrounds us in Nature, which manifests (in this collection, at least) variously in swamps, deserts, forests, and snow-capped mountain ranges. Perhaps, in this era of omnipresent electrical lighting, it's more difficult for people who've never truly been in the dark of a forest to feel a frisson of terror at "The Wendigo." Having never heard ash fall in a fire miles from the nearest town or felt the forest settling about them, they might simply think, "Meh, trees. What's the big deal?" and move on.

This is not to underrate the quality of Blackwood's prose - several of the stories contained in this collection are fantastic, though editor S.T. Joshi's choices for what to include do give you the very strong impression that he just wanted to demonstrate how Blackwood's natural terrors looked in every possible environment (it's the only reason I can think for "Sand" showing up here, as it's a complete clunker, and a low-point on which to close out the volume). "The Willows," "The Wendigo," and "The Man Whom the Trees Loved" are all excellent stories, and "The Insanity of Jones" has one of the best opening paragraphs since "The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents," though the story as a whole doesn't live up to that initial promise.

Perhaps as the whole climate change thing gets out of hand and we're increasingly faced with the reality of an all-powerful, abstract force that doesn't even see us as it sweeps us aside, Blackwood's strand of natural horror will come back into vogue. Until such time as things get truly Roland Emmerich, I suggest reading this one by firelight in the dark outside, and remembering that we never truly conquered Nature - we just managed to dodge it for a while.
Tuliancel
I am very glad I came across this book. Blackwood is a terrific storyteller and these shorts are lots of fun to read. They are very unique and mix lots of creepy and fantastic elements together in order to create exciting tales that, frankly, tell better than some modern short fiction stories I have read! What a imaginative author. Great read at a great price.

PS- I have several of the Penguin Classics that involve the eerie and fantastic fiction of authors from the past, such as Clarke Ashton Smith and HP Lovecraft. They are all enjoyable. Fun introductions to the authors if you haven't read them before. Some of these authors are the inspiration for the many weird and scary elements and ideologies involved in our various formats of media today.
greed style
If you are a fan of H.P. Lovecraft, this book is absolutely indispensable. Blackwood skillfully uses remote landscapes to evoke a sense of dread in his readers at the sheer power and malevolence of ancient natural forces. He slowly unveils information in a way that keeps the reader turning the pages in a haunting style that is rarely encountered in more modern writing styles. "The Willows", "The Wendigo", and "Ancient Sorceries" are the best stories in the volume. I highly recommend this collection.
Tojahn
This edition comes with the following stories:
Smith: An episode in a Lodging-House/The Willows/The Insanity of Jones/Ancient Sorceries/The Man Who Found Out/The Wendigo/The Glamour of the Snow/The Man Whom the Tress Loved/Sand

I didn't know any of Algernon Blackwood work previously; however, after reading several H.P. Lovecraft stories and looking for similar themes I ended up giving him a try. Each story has a unique ambient and a special feeling, for me "The Willows" is the best of the pack but that is of course a personal opinion.

I can say though that his writing style can place you right in the middle of the story. This is a special and appreciated talent he had as our imagination has been somehow diminished by our visual "TV-like" era. To write about visceral and nature inspired fear is a difficult feat, Blackwood does it greatly.

You'll not regret reading him.
Juce
Great collection
Ynap
I collect these ghost stories.
Cobandis
-
I was recently directed to an outstanding author, famous for haunting, scary, engrossing stories, whose work I hadn't read before. Algernon Blackwood, is his name, and he was called to my attention by the editor of a White Nationalist web page, who posted "Willows" on his web site as example of excellent White art.
After reading the story, I couldn't get it out of my mind, so I searched the web for information, and ultimately bought this book from Amazon. "Willows," is among the stories collected here, and it is better than most; but, as a whole, the entire book is great entertainment.
Blackwood, has been compared to Edgar Allen Poe, in his ability to create psychological tension, and palpable unease that creeps up on the reader, and remains awhile. There is great subtlety in the author's presentation of Nature and its relationship to Mankind.
There are nine Blackwood stories in this 374 page book, including about twenty five pages of Explanatory Notes, which shed light on the author and the stories. A number of other Blackwood stories are collected in other books, also available at amazon.
A good choice for a rainy night of reading, alone, in an isolated location.
Good read