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Download Wet Work - The Definitive Edition ePub

by Douglas E Winter,Philip Nutman

Download Wet Work - The Definitive Edition ePub
  • ISBN 1892950677
  • ISBN13 978-1892950673
  • Language English
  • Author Douglas E Winter,Philip Nutman
  • Publisher Overlook Connection Press (August 15, 2005)
  • Pages 316
  • Formats lrf mbr rtf mobi
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Genre Fiction
  • Size ePub 1720 kb
  • Size Fb2 1312 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 783

The shocking novel that captured the attention and praise of today's most acclaimed storytellers returns in an author-approved definitive anniversary edition. Wet Work will show you the final days of humanity, the beginning of the end. Award nominated author Philip Nutman will make you believe the dead will rise up--and walk the earth. The day the comet came, the whole world looked up to the skies. From that day on, there would be no rest, no peace. Especially for the dead. They are everywhere. And as their troops increase in size--and appetite--a new order is slowly established from coast to coast. A new order that leaves no room for the living.

The Downward Spiral: Philip Nutman’s Wet Work. by Douglas E. Winter. This is what we’ve become. Book of the Dead was published in 1989

The Downward Spiral: Philip Nutman’s Wet Work. Meat writhing with maggots. Apocalypse, then and now: The novel you are about to read had its genesis late in the 1980s, during the halcyon days of splatterpunk -a flashfire of horrific fiction that exploited excesses of violence and sex with unrepentant glee. Book of the Dead was published in 1989. It was called Wet Work.

Winter This is what we’ve become. nk -a flashfire of horrific fiction that exploited excesses of violence and sex with unrepentant glee. At splatterpunk’s fierce apogee, before its original question (how far could you go?) was replaced by the inevitable one (how low could you go?), writers John Skipp and Craig Spector assembled an anthology known as Book of the Dead.

Philip Nutman, Douglas E. Despite coming before the current In 1993, Philip Nutman took his short story which had appeared in Skipp and Spector’s Book of the Dead anthology and expanded it into this novel. I haven’t read the short story, and frankly, I can’t imagine it from this novel, as the finished product is epic in the sense of The Stand (a comparison references on the cover): a whole buncha people, each trying to survive in a world in which the radiation from a comet’s tail sickens the living and revives the.

A mutant virus spreads across the United States, killing its victims and then bringing them back to life with voracious appetites for human flesh. Thanks for the experience.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A mutant virus spreads across the United States, killing its victims and then bringing them back to life with voracious appetites for human flesh. Wet Work Mass Market Paperback – June 1, 1993. by. Philip Nutman (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

By (author) Philip Nutman, Introduction by E Douglas Winter. Wet Work will show you the final days of humanity, the beginning of the end. Award nominated author Philip Nutman will make you believe the dead will rise up-and walk the earth. The day the comet came, the whole world looked up to the skies. From that day on, there would be no rest, no peace.

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Fiction, Fiction - Horror, Fiction, Horror, Horror, Horror - General. Are you sure you want to remove Douglas, E. Winter from your list?

Burnt Biscuit Books is privileged to handle the estate of the Bram Stoker .

Burnt Biscuit Books is privileged to handle the estate of the Bram Stoker Award-nominated writer, Philip Nutman. Produced by the late Philip Nutman (Wet Work, Fangoria), this relentless brutal film was awarded Best Feature at the 2012 Buried Alive! Horror Film Festival.

A critical look at the work of Stephen King, writer of horror stories. Prime Evil: New Stories by the Masters of Modern Horror.

One of the year's most acclaimed thriller debuts, Douglas E. Winter's Run is a no-holds barred breakout blockbuster of suspense - the story of a legitimate arms dealer making an illegal gun run. When he incurs the wrath of cops, coworkers, and criminals, Revelations. A critical look at the work of Stephen King, writer of horror stories.

Talk about Wet Work - The Definitive Edition


Nicanagy
Wet Work has a stately, elegiac grace to it. There is such deep, soulful writing, on the order of indeed the songs of Billy Holiday, as Nutman includes in the tapestry, festooned in this place. With gore and blood given a kind of beauty.

The bitter fruit is had by us all really, as we have the need to cling to somebody who will get us out of this mess, and that would be Corvino, the walking dead who can think, is still a vestige of a person. It's fascinating to read the resurrection of the zombie mind, how it rebuilds itself and stops deconstructing in certain places and holds still.

I think we have always wondered what happened if we could not age or could not die, if the body said wait, the pineal gland said no, and the body repelled the radical elements to destroy it. But what if this happened after you're dead and you can't help but be brought to life again. What would that be like? Nutman goes a long way in telling us. `

I think, above the great storytelling, the almost nostalgic splatterpunk passages, the bravura descriptions and characters, and that ability to tread the line between life and death in an almost Matheson/Romero like way, but in the author's own style, own world, is cause for celebration.

There is a melancholy conscience here. It's not a violence for violence sake novel. Some of it is funny. All of it is gripping. But it has this late Saturday afternoon feel to it, like in Autumn, the sun going down early on, in the field of dead grass through which a child runs fast to home.

With that thought in his head, maybe, home is not there any longer, but dead, and he only left alive. But that's wrong, Wet Work said the child running home is dead too. It is one of the most profoundly moving novels I have ever had. You think, somehow, the writer will pull us out of this.

But it can not happen. It's too late. I think it is a story of deep thoughts and tears. And because we need to come to grips with all of this, we can only if we accept their cannibalism. And we do. Because of the things in this country that have happened, as they have, we now see proof positive, that he's right.

We will eventually sooner or later accept with zombie non-thought, anything about somebody if we depend on them in some way, no matter how stupid and cruel they turned out to be, who justify anything and in that high executive office, cannibalism is church doctrine, for after a while, you forget, you get used to, and you are them.

There is early on tender lovemaking, and then in gradations, the brutality beyond words. We're tied inside our bodies. The brain sits there like a huge gray wad of wrinkled chewing gum. In this ugly looking thing, is the greatest creation possibly there is, and it blithely lets itself be leisurely destroyed while figuring out constellations.

This is a novel of the ultimate terror. Ourselves. The language is lovely and places seem so real so touchable. And we think, as this novel slides us into an apocalyptic snake pit, we still have the ability to conjure and to dream, dragged down to the vestiges of the lowest of the geek sideshow. As the cities of people are wrapped in the shrouds of everyone in the world as we face that final shadow where we close our eyes forever, and then eyes open, wake up.

So here still and not us any longer. So many writers of horror traffic in degradation and extreme violence and don't understand that this is a living thing gone dead and come back in a mockery, a monstrous meat puppet Punch and Judy show, and leave it at that.

But some writers are eloquent and see so much, I can't imagine reading this novel without thinking how vulnerable, and how subject to anything in any moment now horrible, we are, that it makes you want to hold everybody in the world because you know what is ahead for them, and try not to think what is ahead for you and the persons you love. And now back to the show.
Hanad
This book is a must read for any fan of horror and apocalypse fiction, I'm not going to give anything away but a totally different take on zombies than all the recent stuff and an immensely fun read, enjoy!
Manesenci
Expecting another great zombie book, and to my surprise is was much more. Not only did it have zombies(including weapons of all kinds, graphic death, and suspense)but it also had covert military action, great character development, intrigue, and several twists. My second review of a book. The first one was terrible, this one I was very happy with. Thank you Mr. Nutman.
Mr_Jeйson
Enjoyed this book, not the best zombie novel I have ever read. But it would be in my top 10. Maybe top 5.
Rleyistr
As Wet Work opens, Dominic Corvino, leader of Spiral, a crack U.S. Black Ops hit team, is in Panama City, Panama, preparing to initiate an operation against four members of the Cali Cartel, main suppliers of cocaine to the states. Assessing his situation, he once again takes notice of the spectacular show presented by the comet Saracen in the night sky.

Corvino doesn't know it yet, but his life is about to get very complicated. First, the operation goes awry, resulting in the deaths of his entire team. Later, he's shot dead by a traitorous colleague, only to rise again as a zombie due to the strange radiation generated by Saracen. He wakes up in a world where humanity is on the verge of extinction due to the presence of sentient zombies who, enjoying near invulnerability, are rounding up those not affected for food. Corvino, one of the "lucky" zombies who can think for themselves, struggles with a gnawing hunger for human flesh even as he seeks vengeance against those who betrayed him. His vendetta against his ex-colleagues propels him towards a meeting with the book's other lead character, Washington DC policeman Nick Packard, an encounter sure to resonate with readers long after they finish the book.

It's always reassuring to find that a book you enjoyed many years ago still holds up upon a subsequent rereading, which I'm pleased to report is the case with Wet Work, Philip Nutman's accomplished 1993 debut novel. Written in homage to Richard Matheson's masterpiece I am Legend, the novel is still, as my friends from New England might say, a "wicked good" read--one of the more readable, well crafted and innovative splatterpunk novels of the era, its plentiful action and "pedal to the metal" approach to gore and violence would make it memorable even if you didn't care about its cast so much. My only problem with this whole project is that it raises the question, what's Nutman been doing for thirteen years that's kept him from delivering other novels? Yes, he's written some comics, and he's been involved in various film projects, but it's a shame he never got around to publishing another novel--it certainly would have been interesting to see what he did next. Hopefully, this welcome reissue will spur some activity in this area.