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Download Arabian Jazz: A Novel ePub

by Diana Abu-Jaber

Download Arabian Jazz: A Novel ePub
  • ISBN 0393324222
  • ISBN13 978-0393324228
  • Language English
  • Author Diana Abu-Jaber
  • Publisher W. W. Norton & Company; Reissue edition (April 17, 2003)
  • Pages 384
  • Formats lit doc docx txt
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Genre Fiction
  • Size ePub 1529 kb
  • Size Fb2 1843 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 249

"This oracular first novel, which unfurls like gossamer [has] characters of a depth seldom found in a debut."―The New Yorker

In Diana Abu-Jaber's "impressive, entertaining" (Chicago Tribune) first novel, a small, poor-white community in upstate New York becomes home to the transplanted Jordanian family of Matussem Ramoud: his grown daughters, Jemorah and Melvina; his sister Fatima; and her husband, Zaeed. The widower Matuseem loves American jazz, kitschy lawn ornaments, and, of course, his daughters. Fatima is obsessed with seeing her nieces married―Jemorah is nearly thirty! Supernurse Melvina is firmly committed to her work, but Jemorah is ambivalent about her identity and role. Is she Arab? Is she American? Should she marry and, if so, whom? Winner of the Oregon Book Award and finalist for the National PEN/Hemingway Award, Arabian Jazz is "a joy to read.... You will be tempted to read passages out loud. And you should" (Boston Globe). USA Today praises Abu-Jaber's "gift for dialogue...her Arab-American rings musically, and hilariously, true."

Abu-Jaber’s novel will probably do more to convince readers to abandon what media analyst Jack Shaheen calls . W. norton & company.

Abu-Jaber’s novel will probably do more to convince readers to abandon what media analyst Jack Shaheen calls America’s ‘abhorrence of the Arab’ than any number of speeches or publicity gambits. Jean Grant, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs. Also by diana abu-jaber. First published as a Norton paperback 2003.

Diana Abu-Jaber writes of what it means to be Arabic, American, an immigrant, a daughter, and a woman trying to find her sense of place in the world and in an often-kooky family. I think everyone has an Auntie Fatima, no matter which culture you come from. And I wish I had a Nassir in mine. Like Abu-Jaber's other novels, she transports you into another culture.

In Diana Abu-Jaber's "impressive, entertaining" (Chicago Tribune) first novel, a small, poor-white community in upstate New York becomes home to the transplanted Jordanian family of Matussem Ramoud: his grown daughters, Jemorah and Melvina; his sister Fatima; and her husband, Zaeed.

light of Diana Abu Jaber‟s Arabian Jazz novel, the study tries. The novel won the. Oregon Book award for Literary Fiction and was a finalist for the PEN Hemingway Award. to shed light on the cultural perplexity in Diana‟s novel, the. Arabic born American writer. and regarded by many critics as the first Arab-American novel, offered what some viewed as. a negative and unflattering portrayal of Arab-Americans.

Abu-Jaber's voluptuous prose features insights into the Arab American community that are wisely, warmly depicted.

A multilayered, beautifully textured novel about family and self, self-indulgence and generosity, against the vivid backdrop of contemporary Miami. In the tropical paradise that is Miami, Avis and Brian Muir are still haunted by the disappearance of their ineffably beautiful daughter, Felice, who ran away when she was thirteen. Abu-Jaber's voluptuous prose features insights into the Arab American community that are wisely, warmly depicted. -San Francisco ChronicleSirine, the heroine of this "deliciously romantic romp" (?Vanity Fair?) is thirty-nine, never married, and living in the Arab-American community of Los Angeles.

A Novel by Abu-Jaber, Diana (Paperback book, 2003) -Arabian Jazz. A Novel by Abu-Jaber, Diana (Paperback book, 2003).

She and her family divide time between Miami, Florida, and Portland, Oregon. Country of Publication. A Novel by Abu-Jaber, Diana (Paperback book, 2003) -Arabian Jazz.

Diana Abu-Jaber's Arabian Jazz, published in 1993, is one of the first contemporary Arab American novels to reach mainstream audiences. Abu-Jaber was uniquely positioned to understand both Jordanian and American culture, having lived for many years in both countries and with one parent from each. Arabian Jazz, her debut, was hailed for bringing everyday Arab American culture to a broader public with a need for greater understanding of Middle Eastern peoples. Acts of terrorism had been in the news, including the 1993 bombing at the base of the World Trade Center by Arab nationals.

We ask you to make a distinction between a complaint and cancellation. We try to assess the exact condition of the goods as objectively as possible. She and her family divide time between Miami, Florida, and Portland, Oregon.

Focusing on updates on literary stuff-readings, novels, memoirs- my own and others'. All those good things. 21 November at 07:43 ·. This is beautiful: stories give us a home. From Open Sesame to Sesame Street, storytelling transcends place and time, and home is a location in the heart. A new 'Sesame Street' show in Arabic aims to help refugee children.

Электронная книга "Arabian Jazz: A Novel", Diana Abu-Jaber Winner of the Oregon Book Award and finalist for the National PEN/Hemingway Award, Arabian Jazz is "a joy to read. You will be tempted to read passages out loud.

Электронная книга "Arabian Jazz: A Novel", Diana Abu-Jaber. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Arabian Jazz: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. And you should" (Boston Globe). her Arab-American rings musically, and hilariously, true.

Talk about Arabian Jazz: A Novel


Modimeena
I loved reading this book, especially after reading her memoir, The Language of Baklava, as I could see her family amidst the characters in the story. Her descriptions of the marriage expectations for young Arab women was both telling and portrayed with such humor. My favorite Character was Melvina, the hard-nosed younger daughter who could speak so bluntly that I just had to laugh aloud. I will be seeking more of her books as she mixes love, humor and deep insight, all interwoven with her characters and stories.
Sarin
Arabian Jazz is a look at life through the eyes of an almost thirty year-old Arabian/American woman searching for identity.

Diana Abu-Jaber writes of what it means to be Arabic, American, an immigrant, a daughter, and a woman trying to find her sense of place in the world and in an often-kooky family. This is done with humor, heart, and breath-stopping prose that are so lovely you will find yourself re-reading passages again and again to hear the rhythm of her language.

I think everyone has an Auntie Fatima, no matter which culture you come from. And I wish I had a Nassir in mine.

Like Abu-Jaber's other novels, she transports you into another culture. Her words are poetic and thought-provoking. It is a beautiful experience to read her writing.

Victoria Allman
author of: SEAsoned: A Chef's Journey with Her Captain
RUL
Worth reading, though the first few pages (and some later) are extremely disappointing. Arabic names are mispronounced, the attempt at comedy is poor, and none of the characters are remotely sympathetic. As the book proceeds, we meet a very different kind of writing. Some of the passages in the book are exceptionally insightful and well written. For those passages it is well worth reading the book. I would rate the book between 1 and 5. It won't tell you much about Arab culture except in parody, but it portrays alienation and prejudice with candor and poignancy.
LONUDOG
Love this author!
Vosho
Interesting but not super as her novel Crescent was. Crescent was really a wonderful novel that I have given as a gift to many friends. I was hoping to feel this way about Arabian Jazz.
Gnng
rather trite & disjointed, read for book group
Xar
I thoroughly enjoyed reading Arabian Jazz. The dialogue was funny and real. The writing was uniquely descriptive, yet it did not appear forced or artificial. I also liked the author's insight into immigration and living between two cultures.

I found the book in one of the little free “libraries” in a subdivision of Des Moines, Iowa, along a nature trail. Since I love to travel and experience new cultures, this appealed to me and I wasn’t disappointed.

Even though this novel was published over 20 years ago, I found it relevant for today.
This light-hearted and imaginative novel portrays a Jordanian family as they adjust to life in the United States. Jazz musician and widower Mattusem Ramoud has raised his two daughters alone since his wife's death, balancing their lives as Americans with their Jordanian hertiage. The extended family is like any other large, eccentric group of people, full of intensity and humor, loving each other unconditionally through whatever difficulties arise.
Jemorah and Melvina have reached marriageable age and their Aunt Fatima, Matussem's sister, is determined that this year, during "Family Function Season", at least Jemorah will find a husband before she is old enough to be disqualified as a spinster. The search is on and Fatima leaves no stone unturned, offering an assortment of odd relatives, second cousins and distant "uncles". But Jemora is in no hurry to make a choice that will alter the course of her life, determined to make a well-informed decision.
This intimate peek into one Arab-American family's experience, blends two generations of Ramouds, all of them quirky and colorful. Many are recent visitors from Jordan who speak in fractured English that renders them even more charming and eccentric, if that is possible, as Abu-Jaber holds her finger directly on the pulse of this remarkable family. Cousin Saiid enthuses, "I must be in heaven, man. You are our cousins, man? This is completely, like, my mind is psyching out."
Old Country fables abound, along with the foolish antics of the younger generation in this eclectic mix of characters. Each page is a delight, bursting with life and energy, family connections and intimate portraits of the bonds of love. Whatever Jemorah decides, she will always have a soft place to fall, her Jordanian-American family her greatest asset. Abu-Jaber has deftly penned the tale of a raucous family, enthusiastic about everything in their lives, music, the future and each other. The Ramoud's share their fascinating culture with the reader, reinforcing the belief of an America that offers infinite possibilities to those who embrace her opportunity and generosity, enriching this country with their accomplishments. Luan Gaines/2003