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Download The Interrogative Mood: A Novel? ePub

by Padgett Powell

Download The Interrogative Mood: A Novel? ePub
  • ISBN 0061859435
  • ISBN13 978-0061859434
  • Language English
  • Author Padgett Powell
  • Publisher Ecco; Reprint edition (October 5, 2010)
  • Pages 192
  • Formats lit lrf doc rtf
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Genre Fiction
  • Size ePub 1150 kb
  • Size Fb2 1205 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 639

“If Duchamp or maybe Magritte wrote a novel (and maybe they did. Did they?) it might look something like this remarkable little book of Padgett Powell’s.”

—Richard Ford

The Interrogative Mood is a wildly inventive, jazzy meditation on life and language by the novelist that Ian Frazier hails as “one of the best writers in America, and one of the funniest, too.” A novel composed entirely of questions, it is perhaps the most audacious literary high-wire act since Nicholson Baker’s The Mezzanine or David Foster Wallace’s stories; a playful and profound book that, as Jonathan Safran Foer says, “will sear the unlucky volumes shelved on either side of it. How it doesn’t, itself, combust in flames is a mystery to me.”


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The Interrogative Mood: A Novel? (. Paperback – Bargain Price, October 5, 2010.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. lt;p style MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; BACKGROUND: white class MsoNormal If Duchamp or maybe Magritte wrote a novel (and maybe they did. Did they?) it might look something like this remarkable little book of Padgett Powell’s. lt;p style MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; BACKGROUND: white class MsoNormal -Richard Ford

The Interrogative Mood is the latest in a series of unpredictable and risky career moves for Powell – unpredictable and .

The Interrogative Mood is the latest in a series of unpredictable and risky career moves for Powell – unpredictable and risky enough that some assumed his career had expired. The novelist Walker Percy remarked that "it reminds one of The Catcher in the Rye, but it's better – sharper, funnier". The book is not a novel but it manages to do something that many novels try to do: it offers a detailed, fascinating character study by exploring the textures of a highly individual and idiosyncratic sensibility.

The Interrogative Mood book. A novel If Duchamp or maybe Magritte wrote a novel (and maybe they did.

If Padgett Powell's new book is a novel, in some Dada sense of the word, it looks awfully similar to a list.

Is your appreciation of a good material thing-let us say that pearl-handled revolver there-influenced by having worked hard to get it, or are you as likely to value a good thing having come by it easily? Do you value coherence of argument? Do you favor a day of the week?

Padgett Powell is the author of six novels, including Edisto, which was nominated for the National Book Award, and two collections of stories.

Padgett Powell is the author of six novels, including Edisto, which was nominated for the National Book Award, and two collections of stories.

The book documents work not only included in the exhibition but also from the past several years. One of the main principles explored in Laura Padgetts most recent work is the diptych. These photographic pairs are sometimes composed seamlessly, sometimes with a thin space in between.

The Interrogative Mood - Padgett Powell. Are your emotions pure?

Padgett Powell, author of the acclaimed The Interrogative Mood and one of the few truly important American writers of our time (Sam Lipsyte), returns .

Padgett Powell, author of the acclaimed The Interrogative Mood and one of the few truly important American writers of our time (Sam Lipsyte), returns with a hilarious Southern send-up of Samuel Beckett's classic Waiting for Godot. A phantasmagoric dream of a novel, exploring the mind of a housewife enamored of historical personages, twisted love stories, and strange conspiraciesMrs.

Talk about The Interrogative Mood: A Novel?


Whiteseeker
There's plenty to say about the fact that this book is composed entirely of questions--how this mode possibly turns the focus of the narrative upon the reader, or how it reverses the hierarchy of reading so that the narrator (interviewer?) becomes the dynamic engager of text--but the real thrill of this book was nothing less than the constructions of the sentences themselves, the rich levels of rhythm and counterpoint that are found and rediscovered in a sentence mode that often seems to be used merely as the gateway towards information rather than a joy unto itself.

Powell, though, has a mastery and joy of language that I haven't seen since his mentor, Donald Barthelme. The depth of material, the wonderfully acoustic and left-field range of subjects, make what may sound at first like an interesting exercise (but not something akin to novel) a plain joy to read. Just listen to these variations and rhythm:

If you had a dog small enough to be transported in the pocket of your coat, what would you name it? Do you think in terms of salvation or redemption? Do you appreciate the color changes of leavews in the fall or is that spectacle a tad too popularly sentimental for you? Have you ever been catheterized? Is there a set number of rings you like a phone to ring before you pick up? Does the noise made by corduroy pants irritate you? Do you eat flan?

But Powell is not only a master of variation, but of repetition:

Would you say that you are pro peanut brittle, anti peanut brittle, or would you say "I do not have a dog in the peanut-brittle fight"?

Powell's interrogative sentences are worthy of reading aloud, of friggin' laughing aloud at, of waylaying unsuspecting strangers with. There's little more than I can offer here--read the damn book, already.
FLIDER
This book isn't simply a bunch of silly questions from a clever and funny writer. The experience of reading it was very unique and quite enjoyable. It has also lingered in my mind as much as any other book has. This steady stream of brilliantly crafted questions poked, prodded, and tickled my brain in every way imaginable. I was just as likely to spontaneously laugh (I couldn't read it in bed because I would invariably wake my wife up) as I was to be struck by serious question that would cause me to drop my eyes, sigh, and find myself lost in thought minutes later.
Zeus Wooden
Powell's The Interrogative Mood asks me every question I ever wanted to wonder about. And some I would never have thought of! Readers should take this medicinal mind game in small drafts.
Gravelblade
This book is very cool. It goes beyond the gimmick of being composed entirely of questions, and ends up adding up to, if not a narrative, a unified, quirky, and entertaining world view. It's challenging too, if you want it to be. Many of the questions invite you to think hard about all sorts of things, and to relate the questions to your own life. Why only four stars? Well, it's not in the same class as The Great Gatsby (and doesn't pretend to be).
ℓo√ﻉ
This book is sooooo much fun. Questions I had never considered, and those I have asked myself. At age 21 fresh out of college and married, my answers would have been different than they are at age 64, divorced and retired. I like to think I have grown and learned a thing or two during those 40+ years.
Enjoy the book no matter what your age or experience. And keep it on the back burner for a review every decade or so.
Joony
Strange.....didn't finish it...barely started it. May not be my cup of tea. Not going to criticize a genre just because it doen's touch me.
Kelerius
Not for everyone but it was for me !

As Mike& Mike used to do with things: " Love it or Shove it"

For me a major LOVE IT
Interesting!! I have never seen a book written in this format! Sometimes a tad boring, but constantly thought-provoking. Enjoyable read!