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Download The Street of a Thousand Blossoms ePub

by Gail Tsukiyama

Download The Street of a Thousand Blossoms ePub
  • ISBN 1250000661
  • ISBN13 978-1250000668
  • Language English
  • Author Gail Tsukiyama
  • Publisher St. Martin's Griffin; Special edition, Value Promotion edition (May 24, 2011)
  • Pages 448
  • Formats docx lrf rtf docx
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Genre Fiction
  • Size ePub 1813 kb
  • Size Fb2 1213 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 518

It is Tokyo in 1939. On the Street of a Thousand Blossoms, two orphaned brothers dream of a future firmly rooted in tradition. The older boy, Hiroshi, shows early signs of promise at the national obsession of sumo wrestling, while Kenji is fascinated by the art of Noh theater masks. But as the ripples of war spread to their quiet neighborhood, the brothers must put their dreams on hold—and forge their own paths in a new Japan. Meanwhile, the two young daughters of a renowned sumo master find their lives increasingly intertwined with the fortunes of their father’s star pupil, Hiroshi.The Street of a Thousand Blossoms is a powerfully moving masterpiece about tradition and change, loss and renewal, and love and family from a glorious storyteller at the height of her powers.


Gail Tsukiyama expertly and beautifully weaves together the lives of a sumo wrestler and his family, and a Noh mask .

Gail Tsukiyama expertly and beautifully weaves together the lives of a sumo wrestler and his family, and a Noh mask maker through World War II and into the 1960s. She has always been a wonderful storyteller, but in The Street of a Thousand Blossoms she proves herself to be a master storyteller. Jane Hamilton, author of The Book of Ruth. and A Map of the World. Gail Tsukiyama is a writer of astonishing grace, delicacy, and feeling. Her lyric precision serves not only to leave the reader breathless, but to illuminate human suffering and redemption with clarity and power

It is clear what Gail Tsukiyama wants to communicate in her newest novel, The Street of a Thousand Blossoms.

It is clear what Gail Tsukiyama wants to communicate in her newest novel, The Street of a Thousand Blossoms. The book strives to convey love, loss, coming-of-age, the horrors of war, the rebuilding of a nation-and throw in a little instruction in Japanese culture to boot. Spanning more than thirty years immediately before, during, and after World War II, Blossoms follows the lives of the residents of Yanaka, a suburb of Tokyo.

This was my second book from Gail Tsukiyama, I read the Samuri Garden and enjoys that. This novel is set in Japan and covers the years 1939 to 1966. It's a fast moving family saga and the only book I have ever read which dealt with WWII from a Japanese perspective. However, as the author is a Japanese American woman who lives in California, I must say that it seemed a bit revisionist and targeted to a modern western audience.

In Gail Tsukiyama’s novel, two brothers take refuge in their art and families after Japan’s defeat. Near the beginning of Gail Tsukiyama’s new novel, a grandmother tells her two young grandsons a story about the death of her daughter and son-in-law - the boys’ parents - but it’s also a story about innocent people who suffer because of the folly of others and the inexplicability of fate, and who are redeemed through the lives of their children. The Street of a Thousand Blossoms has epic ambitions - considerable scope, encompassing the years 1939-66; a multitude of significant characters; and recurring moments of tragedy and redemption.

She moved around her bedroom slowly, feeling heavy and clumsy. Her legs were swollen and her back hurt. of the damp tatami mats from the continual February rains. At twenty-two, she already felt old and tired. Did her mother feel like this carrying Haru and her? For Aki, this last month of pregnancy was nothing but a torment, and she could barely remember what it was like not to be pregnant

Электронная книга "The Street of a Thousand Blossoms: A Novel", Gail Tsukiyama.

Электронная книга "The Street of a Thousand Blossoms: A Novel", Gail Tsukiyama. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Street of a Thousand Blossoms: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

On the Street of a Thousand Blossoms, two orphaned brothers dream of a future firmly rooted in tradition

On the Street of a Thousand Blossoms, two orphaned brothers dream of a future firmly rooted in tradition. Don't miss it if you would like to read a novel that is beautifully written, compelling, and poignant-with the added benefit of being a "page turner. Breathtaking, a grand masterpiece of epic proportions.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. On the Street of a Thousand Blossoms, two orphaned brothers are growing up with their loving grandparents, who inspire them to dream of a future firmly rooted in tradition. The older boy, Hiroshi, shows unusual skill at the national obsession of sumo wrestling, while Kenji is fascinated by the art of creating hard-carved masks for actors in the Noh theater. Across town, a renowned sumo master, Sho Tanaka, lives with his wife and their two young daughters: the delicate, daydreaming Aki and her independent sister, Haru.

Gail Tsukiyama is the bestselling author of five previous novels, including Women of the Silk and The Samurai's Garden, as well as a recipient of the Academy of American Poets Award and the PEN Oakland/Josephine Miles Literary Award

Gail Tsukiyama is the bestselling author of five previous novels, including Women of the Silk and The Samurai's Garden, as well as a recipient of the Academy of American Poets Award and the PEN Oakland/Josephine Miles Literary Award. She divides her time between El Cerrito and Napa Valley, California.

Talk about The Street of a Thousand Blossoms


artman
This is the first book I've read by Tsukiyama. Most reviewers say they were disappointed and recommended her "The Samurai Garden" instead, so I'm putting that on my reading list. The story is told from the perspective of Japanese civilians before, during, and after the war. Since it is set in Tokyo, of course it includes the harrowing fire bombing. In some ways it is similar to my own novel of postwar Japan, "The Earthquake Doll," but mine is set in Sapporo just as the Occupation ended. Hokkaido was not as hard-hit by bombings as Tokyo, and my story is more about the fact that women suddenly had civil liberties and how they balanced their freedoms with centuries of tradition. I adore Tsuikiyama's delicate writing style. The main characters are brothers, one a sumo wrestler and the other an artisan who studies mask-making for the Noh theater, so it was a special treat to learn about these aspects of Japanese culture. I look forward to reading more of this author's work.
Άνουβις
This was my second book from Gail Tsukiyama , I read the Samuri Garden and enjoys that....The Street of a Thousand Blossoms was not a disappointment! Beautifully told and her gentle style of writing leads you into the Sumo world beautifully and I learned much about a subject I had little knowledge of. Lovely book .
lubov
The Street of a Thousand Blossoms is an outstanding novel portraying the lives of two Japanese families over the years 1939-1966.

The story is told through vignettes at various points through the years, with each vignette having significance and a contribution all its own.

The characters are developed gradually and deeply. I came to care about them as I wish would occur more frequently in novels.

I found the writing to be very clear and quite plausible: broadly consistent with what little I know about Japan during this time. In one way, the book is difficult to read, since it includes tragedy as well as triumphs and rewards. In this way, I found the novel to feel true, even though fictional. I'm sure it presents only some aspects of living in Japan over these years. One area that seemed weak to me was the period of occupation after the war. The US presence seemed surprisingly distant and irrelevant to the characters.

I found that some of the other reviews contain more plot detail than I like to read before reading the book, so beware of spoilers... Also, obviously, I disagree with some of the more critical reviews. I found the pacing to be leisurely, but the story kept a firm grip on my interest.

Highly recommended. 4.5 stars, if 1/2 stars were available.
Urreur
This novel is set in Japan and covers the years 1939 to 1966. It's a fast moving family saga and the only book I have ever read which dealt with WWII from a Japanese perspective. However, as the author is a Japanese American woman who lives in California, I must say that it seemed a bit revisionist and targeted to a modern western audience. In other words, it made the suffering of the Japanese people during that time period a result of the ambitions of the Emperor in search of glory rather than the Americans who were doing the bombing.

That said, there was a scene about the fire bombing of Tokyo that was very real. I related to the characters in the book who were going through it and was able to see the Americans through their eyes. This is the story of two young boys being raised by their grandparents and each one of their personalities were very well developed and taught me something about Japan that I never knew before.

One of the boys grows up to be a sumo wrestler and the book takes the reader through the process of his training as well as bringing out the importance of sumo in Japanese culture. The other boy grows up to be a mask maker and this taught me a lot about this particular art form. I loved these sections.

With the exception of the grandmother, I never really felt as strongly about the women in these men's lives even though I must say the author tried. There are two sisters who were victims of the fire bombing in childhood and the book tries to show how this affected them as adults. Yes. I felt sorry for them and understood them but I thought the author spent a bit too much time on them.

Basically, I enjoyed the book. I learned some interesting things about Japan from a skilled novel writer. Yes, I recommend it. But it certainly isn't on the top of my list.
Saithinin
Street of A Thousand Blossoms is an epic work spanning the pre and post war years in Japan. History comes to life through the everyday struggles of ordinary people trying to cope with the destruction,deprivation and misery of war.The topics of sumo wrestling and mask making at first did not appeal to me ,but in the deft hands of Tsukiyama I was drawn in and won over.It occurred to me that these two topics offer wonderful analogies to the many themes running though the novel. Sumo wrestling represents strength and honor...... attributes of the main characters......Hiroshi, Haru,Kenji and the nurturing grandparents, Yoshio and Fumiko.......... Mask making provides a cover for the realities of war........as well as a cover for the truths that are so difficult to cope with in the main characters......the mangled hand of Haru , the unrealized true nature of the mask maker, Yoshiwara,the heartbreaking guilt of Aki,and the unattainable love of Haru for Hiroshi.......Tsukiyama has a way of telling a story that draws you in and holds you there and forever changes the way you think afterwards.