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Download Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Bar the Doors ePub

by Alfred Hitchcock

Download Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Bar the Doors ePub
  • ISBN 3440001660
  • ISBN13 978-3440001660
  • Language English
  • Author Alfred Hitchcock
  • Publisher Dell; 1st edition (1962)
  • Formats lrf lrf mobi lit
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Genre Fiction
  • Size ePub 1709 kb
  • Size Fb2 1353 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 186

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Alfred Hitchcock Presents is an American television anthology series that was created, hosted, and produced by Alfred Hitchcock; the program aired on CBS and NBC between 1955 and 1965. It features dramas, thrillers, and mysteries

Alfred Hitchcock Presents is an American television anthology series that was created, hosted, and produced by Alfred Hitchcock; the program aired on CBS and NBC between 1955 and 1965. It features dramas, thrillers, and mysteries. Between 1962 and 1965 it was renamed The Alfred Hitchcock Hour. By the time the show premiered on October 2, 1955, Hitchcock had been directing films for over three decades. Time magazine named Alfred Hitchcock Presents as one of "The 100 Best TV Shows of All Time"

Alfred Hitchcock Presents book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Bar The Doors as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Alfred Hitchcock Presents book. A collection of suspense stories.

10 January at 14:32 ·. We don't recommend staying in the Bates motel, but we do recommend staying in this shirt.

Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock, KBE (13 August 1899 – 29 April 1980) was an English film director and producer. He is one of the most influential and extensively studied filmmakers in the history of cinema.

Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Stories That Go Bump in the Night. From all the raving I heard, I will have to read it, too. We both love most things Hitchcock, and this book really delivered. 3 people found this helpful.

Alfred Hitchcock Presents is an American television anthology series hosted and executive produced by Alfred Hitchcock, which aired on CBS and NBC between 1955 and 1965. It featured dramas, thrillers, and mysteries. By the time it premiered on October 2, 1955, Hitchcock had been directing films for over three decades.

Name: Alfred Joseph Hitchcock. Take a flight of fancy and imagine if Alfred Hitchcock was plying his trade in Hollywood today

Name: Alfred Joseph Hitchcock. Essential DVDs: The 39 Steps (1935), The Lady Vanishes (1938), Rebecca (1940), Shadow Of A Doubt (1943), Notorious (1946), Strangers On A Train (1951), Rear Window (1954), Vertigo (1958), North By Northwest (1959), Psycho (1960), The Birds (1963). Oscars: The Irving Thalberg Award (1968). In His Own Words: I am a typed director. If I made Cinderella, the audience would immediately be looking for a body in the coach. Take a flight of fancy and imagine if Alfred Hitchcock was plying his trade in Hollywood today

Alfred Hitchcock may be a cinematic legend, but he's no stranger to television Alfred Hitchcock is hailed by critics and film buffs alike as The Master of Suspense after countless iconic thrillers like Psycho and Vertigo, the former of which spawned.

Alfred Hitchcock may be a cinematic legend, but he's no stranger to television. Here are the 10 best episodes he directed for his very own show. Alfred Hitchcock is hailed by critics and film buffs alike as The Master of Suspense after countless iconic thrillers like Psycho and Vertigo, the former of which spawned multiple sequels and the successful TV prequel Bates Motel. But as inseparable from cinema as may be, Hitchcock himself is no stranger to television. He hosted an anthology thriller series in the fifties, providing witty intros and outros. The framing device offered a wry, dark humor accompanying tales of murder and revenge.

Talk about Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Bar the Doors


Shakagul
Originally published in 1946, this was one of the first anthologies to be associated with Alfred Hitchcock. Most of the stories are old classic horror tales.

1. Speaking of Terror - Alfred Hitchcock
2. Pollock and the Porroh Man - H.G. Wells
3. The Storm - McKnight Malmar
4. Moonlight Sonata - Alexander Woollcott
5. The Half-Pint Flask - DuBose Heyward
6. The Kill - Peter Fleming
7. The Upper Berth - F. Marion Crawford
8. Midnight Express - Alfred Noyes
9. The Damned Thing - Ambrose Bierce
10. The Metronome - August Derleth
11. The Pipe-Smoker - Martin Armstrong
12. The Corpse at the Table - Samuel Hopkins Adams
13. The Woman at Seven Brothers - Wilbur Daniel Steele
14. The Book - Margaret Irwin
Tujar
ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS: BAR THE DOORS (Dell, 1962), edited by Alfred Hitchcock, contains a short introduction and 13 short stories of very mixed quality, most of them "thrillers" with supernatural creatures (such as vampires and ghosts) or supernatural powers (such as black magic and voodoo spells). It is basically a reprint of BAR THE DOORS! (Dell, 1946), also edited by Hitchcock, which contained one additional story.

Following the order of the Table of Contents, the stories are "Pollock and the Porroh Man" by H. G. Wells (originally published in NEW BUDGET magazine, May 1895), "The Storm" by McKnight Malmar (GOOD HOUSEKEEPING, Feb. 1944), "Moonlight Sonata" by Alexander Woollcott (THE NEW YORKER, 3 Oct. 1931), "The Half-Pint Flask" by DuBose Heyward (THE BOOKMAN, May 1927; 1929 in a small one-story book), "The Kill" by Peter Fleming (1931 in CREEPS AT NIGHT: CHILLS AND THRILLS, ed. Dashiell Hammett), "The Upper Berth" by F. Marion Crawford (UNWIN'S ANNUAL, 1886), "Midnight Express" by Alfred Noyes (THIS WEEK MAGAZINE, 3 Nov. 1935), "The Damned Thing" by Ambrose Bierce (1893 in his collection CAN SUCH THINGS BE?), "The Metronome" by August Derleth (WEIRD TALES, Feb. 1935), "The Pipe-Smoker" by Martin Armstrong (FORTNIGHTLY REVIEW, Oct. 1932), "The Corpse on the Table" by Samuel Hopkins Adams (SATURDAY REVIEW, Aug. 1942), "The Woman at Seven Brothers" by Wilbur Daniel Steele (HARPER'S MONTHLY, Dec. 1917), and "The Book" by Margaret Irwin (THE LONDON MERCURY, Sep. 1930).

In my judgment the best story in this book is Heyward's "The Half-Pint Flask," a story about the use of voodoo to regain an old bottle that a condescending and bigoted white scholar stole from a Negro's grave. The story is intelligent, well-written, and compassionate. (Heyward also wrote a story titled "Porgy" which he and his wife turned into a Pulitzer Prize winning play called PORGY ... which the Gershwin brothers turned into the famous musical PORGY AND BESS.) I would give this story a solid "A" grade.

Two other very good stories, deserving at least "A-" grades, are Margaret Irwin's "The Book" and Ambrose Bierce's famous, often reprinted story "The Damned Thing." Both are clever, thought-provoking stories, one about a book that has the power to corrupt its reader, the other about an invisible wild creature.

Three stories that I gave "B" grades to are Noyes's "Midnight Express" (which has a convoluted pretzel pattern for its structure), Wells's "Pollock and the Porroh Man" (which leaves the readier wondering whether magic or a guilty conscience is the driving force), and Steele's "The Woman at Seven Brothers" (which leaves the reader wondering whether a ghost or a craving for another man's wife is the cause of a young man's downfall).

With one exception, the remaining stories received grades in the "C" range. They had some interesting features, mingled with relatively clear weaknesses. The exception, which I gave a "D+" to, was August Derleth's "The Metronome," which seemed by far the worst story in this anthology. In it an evil stepmother harms her stepson ... and in a rather lame, undistinguished manner he gets revenge after his death.

By the way, Peter Fleming was the elder brother of Ian Fleming, the author of the James Bond heroic-erotic spy fantasies.

All in all, I would give this very mixed anthology a "B-" grade ... while strongly recommending Heyward's and Irwin's seldom reprinted stories.

POSTSCRIPT: This anthology's Acknowledgments page provided incomplete and sometimes erroneous information about when and where these stories first appeared. The same, unfortunately, is true about the huge reference book INDEX TO CRIME AND MYSTERY ANTHOLOGIES (1990) by William Contento and Martin H. Greenberg. Its information on at least 6 of these 13 stories was incorrect and/or incomplete. I can't promise that my own findings about publication dates and locations are totally accurate, but they are far less flawed than these other two sources.
Amarin
BAR THE DOORS! (Dell, 1946), edited by Alfred Hitchcock, reprinted as ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS: BAR THE DOORS (Dell, 1962; with one less story), contains a short introduction and 14 short stories of very mixed quality, most of them "thrillers" with supernatural creatures (such as vampires and ghosts) or supernatural powers (such as black magic and voodoo spells).

Following the order of the Table of Contents, the stories are "Pollock and the Porroh Man" by H. G. Wells (originally published in NEW BUDGET magazine, May 1895), "The Storm" by McKnight Malmar (GOOD HOUSEKEEPING, Feb. 1944), "Moonlight Sonata" by Alexander Woollcott (THE NEW YORKER, 3 Oct. 1931), "The Half-Pint Flask" by DuBose Heyward (THE BOOKMAN, May 1927; 1929 in a small one-story book), "The Kill" by Peter Fleming (1931 in CREEPS AT NIGHT: CHILLS AND THRILLS, ed. Dashiell Hammett), "The Upper Berth" by F. Marion Crawford (UNWIN'S ANNUAL, 1886), "Midnight Express" by Alfred Noyes (THIS WEEK MAGAZINE, 3 Nov. 1935), "The Damned Thing" by Ambrose Bierce (1893 in his collection CAN SUCH THINGS BE?), "Couching at the Door" by Dorothy K. Broster (CORNHILL MAGAZINE, Dec. 1933), "The Metronome" by August Derleth (WEIRD TALES, Feb. 1935), "The Pipe-Smoker" by Martin Armstrong (FORTNIGHTLY REVIEW, Oct. 1932), "The Corpse on the Table" by Samuel Hopkins Adams (SATURDAY REVIEW, Aug. 1942), "The Woman at Seven Brothers" by Wilbur Daniel Steele (HARPER'S MONTHLY, Dec. 1917), and "The Book" by Margaret Irwin (THE LONDON MERCURY, Sep. 1930).

In my judgment the best story in this book is Heyward's "The Half-Pint Flask," a story about the use of voodoo to regain an old bottle that a condescending and bigoted white scholar stole from a Negro's grave. The story is intelligent, well-written, and compassionate. I would give this story a solid "A" grade. (Heyward also wrote a story titled "Porgy" which he and his wife turned into a Pulitzer Prize winning play called PORGY ... which the Gershwin brothers turned into the famous musical PORGY AND BESS.)

Two other very good stories, deserving at least "A-" grades, are Margaret Irwin's "The Book" and Ambrose Bierce's famous, often reprinted story "The Damned Thing." Both are clever, thought-provoking stories, one about a book that has the power to corrupt its reader, the other about an invisible wild creature.

Three stories that I gave "B" grades to are Noyes's "Midnight Express" (which has a convoluted pretzel pattern for its structure), Wells's "Pollock and the Porroh Man" (which leaves the readier wondering whether magic or a guilty conscience is the driving force), and Steele's "The Woman at Seven Brothers" (which leaves the reader wondering whether a ghost or a craving for another man's wife is the cause of a young man's downfall).

With one exception, the remaining stories received grades in the "C" range. They had some interesting features, mingled with relatively clear weaknesses. The exception, which I gave a "D+" to, was August Derleth's "The Metronome," which seemed by far the worst story in this anthology. In it an evil stepmother harms her stepson ... and in a rather lame, undistinguished manner he gets revenge after his death.

By the way, Peter Fleming was the elder brother of Ian Fleming, the author of the James Bond heroic-erotic spy fantasies.

All in all, I would give this very mixed anthology a "B-" grade ... while strongly recommending Heyward's and Irwin's seldom reprinted stories.

POSTSCRIPT: This anthology's Acknowledgments page provided incomplete and sometimes erroneous information about when and where these stories first appeared. The same, unfortunately, is true about the huge reference book INDEX TO CRIME AND MYSTERY ANTHOLOGIES (1990) by William Contento and Martin H. Greenberg. Its information on at least 7 of these 14 stories was incorrect and/or incomplete. I can't promise that my own findings about publication dates and locations are totally accurate, but they are far less flawed than these other two sources.