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Download Faint of Heart ePub

by Jeff Strand

Download Faint of Heart ePub
  • ISBN 0615606660
  • ISBN13 978-0615606668
  • Language English
  • Author Jeff Strand
  • Publisher Gallows Press (April 4, 2012)
  • Pages 156
  • Formats lrf rtf lrf docx
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Genre Fiction
  • Size ePub 1227 kb
  • Size Fb2 1435 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 589

Rebecca Harpster is frightened of spending the night alone, but she assures her husband Gary that she'll be fine when he goes out camping with his buddies for the weekend. They have a safe little home in the woods of Alaska with an excellent security system. Yeah, she knows she'll spend the entire time jumping at every noise, but she also knows that the danger is all in her head. By Sunday night, Gary still hasn't returned. And when somebody shows up at the house, it's not her husband. At gunpoint, Rebecca learns what has happened. Two men have kidnapped Gary. He went through a weekend of pure hell. They'll give him back to her, but first, Rebecca has to relive his entire experience, step by horrific step... …and survive...

This book is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents are either products of the author's imagination or are used fictitiously.

com All rights reserved. This book is a work of fiction. Any resemblance to actual events, locales, or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental.

Jeff Strand (born December 14, 1970) is an American writer, best known for his works of horror-comedy. Lost Homicidal Maniac (Answers to Shirley ). He has written novels, short stories, screenplays and comedy sketches  . After a string of books in other styles, Strand published Graverobbers Wanted (No Experience Necessary), the first novel in the horror-comedy style that he would later become known for, in 2000 through the publisher Hard Shell Word Factory.

One of the knives struck Todd in the shoulder, while the other slashed across his upper chest.

One of the knives struck Todd in the shoulder, while the other slashed across his upper chest fe still lodged in his shoulder. Alan grabbed him by the back of the collar as Nicholas jumped to his feet and hurried forward. Stephen rushed out of the woods, a few feet from where Alan had emerged. Don't move, either of you!" he shouted, pointing the weapon first at Nicholas, then at Rebecca

Now I can blab that the book was The Greatest Zombie Movie Ever, which was optioned by Scott Winlaw and Craig George (who will be producing and directing together) of Binge Bros.

Now I can blab that the book was The Greatest Zombie Movie Ever, which was optioned by Scott Winlaw and Craig George (who will be producing and directing together) of Binge Bros.

Faint of Heart is a perfect example Strand does a great job pacing out the story, never letting the stakes fade from memory keeping things always subtly escalating until everything explodes in a bloodbath of violence.

Faint of Heart is a perfect example. It's exactly as long as it needs to be to serve its purpose and its purpose is butt-kicking. A lightning fast read that can be comfortably finished in one sitting, the book is filled with action, wit, a small dollop of stomach-churning violence, and a satisfying pay-off. Faint is both different and familiar. well, it ends, and does so quickly and without much of a conclusion to wrap it up.

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Talk about Faint of Heart


Arashigore
Maybe it was because I was introduced to Jeff Strand with GRAVEROBBERS WANTED (NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY), but I always expect his stories to have more humor in them than horror. Dark humor which is often better than just plain humor. I need to reset my expectation though. Many of his later books have more suspense or horror than comedy. The humorous moments are still there but the ratio has changed.

FAINT OF HEART was a good suspenseful story that focuses on Rebecca Harpster. Rebecca is staying at her remote Alaska home while her husband Gary goes out for a guy's weekend away. However, Rebecca is insecure about herself and worries about almost everything: noises outside, imagined fears, being alone, her husband never returning home. Unfortunately Gary doesn't return home on time; instead a guy shows up claiming to have kidnapped Gary. And the only way for Rebecca to get Gary back unharmed is to do exactly what the guy says.

While a good plot device that hooked me at the start, it did threaten to become boring. Strand did a good job though by keeping the story to a novella length instead of unnecessarily padding it into a longer book length story. The story stays tight and much more focused. My only gripe would be the rate of character growth or change. Rebecca ends up different by the end of the story but the transition to that point came about in leaps instead of gradual growth. It was something that was harder to believe. I suppose that is the negative of novella length works: it is harder to have change gradually occur. Regardless, Strand did a great job with the book and I will continue to happily purchase and read his books.
Naril
One of the best things about the e-reader revolution is that it has done away with the need to "pad" stories. Authors no longer have to take a story that would work wonderfully as a 30-40 thousand word novella and pump it up to a more "publishable" (but diluted) 80-100 thousand.

Faint of Heart is a perfect example. It's exactly as long as it needs to be to serve its purpose and its purpose is butt-kicking.

A lightning fast read that can be comfortably finished in one sitting, the book is filled with action, wit, a small dollop of stomach-churning violence, and a satisfying pay-off.

Faint is both different and familiar. For those who love his work: don't worry, all of Jeff Strand's signature humor and splat-schtick is present although the gore is downplayed to make this more palatable for a general audience. Where this really succeeds, though, is as a gateway read. Crime/thriller fans that are getting their first exposure here will learn what horror fans have known all along: Strand is the man.

At two bucks, this is a must buy.
JOIN
Faint of Heart reads more like a long short story than a short novel - and while that's not always a good thing, it's mainly intended as a comment on how streamlined and focused it is on telling its story. That story: a young woman's husband disappears, but two men attack her and tell her that she can save his life - if she undergoes the same experience he did. There are definite shades of The Vanishing to the setup, but what follows is more of a twisted game, as the men string along our heroine with bizarre goals and a constant sense of fear and unease. Strand does a great job pacing out the story, never letting the stakes fade from memory keeping things always subtly escalating until everything explodes in a bloodbath of violence at the book's end. And then...well, it ends, and does so quickly and without much of a conclusion to wrap it up. Ultimately, that's kind of what happens for a lot of the book; Strand is so focused on his main story that just about everything else - characterization, fleshing out the hints about our heroine's paranoia, making the secondary characters matter - takes a distant second place. While you're reading Faint of Heart, it's pretty addictive and hard to put down; once you finish it, though, it feels a little unsatisfying, as though you just read a pretty good rough draft of a book that could have been something even better.
Contancia
First thing's first,

I'm not sure that Jeff Strand can write a poor story. Oh, I'm sure that he may have the capability to sit down and vomit out something that is not to his liking, but everything that I've read of the man's work - he's tickled my funny bone with sawing it off as well.

Faint of heart is no different.

It is a story of a woman who has to relive the gruesome experiences of her husband in order to see him alive again.

In short, it's a mind trip of whacked out craziness that only Strand can deliver. The way that he makes you cringe, then giggle, then make you feel sick for giggling about what it was that made you cringe is near genius.

Something that I appreciated about the novella was that it wasn't drawn out. There were no parts that I was bored, expectant or even thinking of putting the book down. It was a good length for us ADHD readers out there who prefer to read on the fly and digest even faster.

The only thing that prevented me from giving it a complete, 100% awesome 5 star review was that I felt the ending came too soon and ended a little flat for my tastes. I would have liked to have had the pleasure to witness more twists, but still this does not deter from the book at all.

So, in closing, if you've read Jeff Strand's work before - you will not be disappointed. If you haven't, then may I suggest a 32,000 word novella guaranteed to make you never want to go camping with friends on a weekend in Alaska!