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Download The Changeling: A Novel ePub

by Kate Horsley

Download The Changeling: A Novel ePub
  • ISBN 1590301943
  • ISBN13 978-1590301944
  • Language English
  • Author Kate Horsley
  • Publisher Shambhala (April 12, 2005)
  • Pages 352
  • Formats txt mbr azw mobi
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Genre Fiction
  • Size ePub 1660 kb
  • Size Fb2 1167 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 479

Here, the author of the acclaimed Confessions of a Pagan Nun takes us to fourteenth-century Ireland for a strange and luminous tale of the elusive nature of identity and of triumph in adversity. The Changeling is the story of Grey, a peasant girl who is raised as a boy, and who, until adolescence, never doubts herself to be male. The revelation of her womanhood marks the beginning of her journey through a succession of changing identities—including son, wife, warrior, and mother—each of which brings its own special wisdom, but none of which, she discovers, can ultimately define her. In the course of her adventurous life, Grey deals with all the challenges of her tumultuous age—from political oppression to corrupt Church hierarchy to the horrors of the Black Death—ultimately finding peace and a kind of redemption by embracing the beautifully impermanent quality of identity that her unusual life has enabled her to understand. (Previously published in hardcover as The Changeling of Finnistuath .)

Originally published under title: The changeling of Finnistuath. The author takes us to fourteenth-century Ireland for a strange and luminous tale of the elusive nature of identity and of triumph in adversity.

Originally published under title: The changeling of Finnistuath. The Changeling of Finnistuath is the story of Grey, a peasant girl who is raised as a boy, and who, until adolescence, never doubts herself to be male. The revelation of her womanhood marks the beginning of her journey - including son, whore, warrior, and mother - each of which brings its own special wisdom, but none of which, she discovers, can ultimately define her.

Not to be confused with the novel connected to angelina jolies newest movie. The changling follows a girl who is brought up as a boy. Fearing loosing her child to the anger of her husband, she raises her daughter as a boy, fooling both child and father, by convincing them both she has very deformed genitals. Through shame the girl grows up the pride of her father, and the secret of her mother, only to be pushed finally in the direction of the church.

About The Changeling. Here, the author of the acclaimed Confessions of a Pagan Nun takes us to fourteenth-century Ireland for a strange and luminous tale of the elusive nature of identity and of triumph in adversity

Category: Historical Fiction Literary Fiction. About The Changeling. Here, the author of the acclaimed Confessions of a Pagan Nun takes us to fourteenth-century Ireland for a strange and luminous tale of the elusive nature of identity and of triumph in adversity. The Changeling is the story of Grey, a peasant girl who is raised as a boy, and who, until adolescence, never doubts herself to be male.

Kate Horsley (born 1952) is the pen name of Kate Parker, an author of numerous works of historical fiction, three of which are rooted in the Old West. Parker is a professor of English at Central New Mexico Community College in Albuquerque

Kate Horsley (born 1952) is the pen name of Kate Parker, an author of numerous works of historical fiction, three of which are rooted in the Old West. Parker is a professor of English at Central New Mexico Community College in Albuquerque. She has had a lifelong flirtation with Zen after reading Alan Watts. Her published novels include: "Crazy Woman" (1992) - Set in New Mexico. A Killing in New Town (1996) - Set in New Mexico. Confessions of a Pagan Nun (2002) - Set in Ireland.

Kate Horsley lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and teaches creative writing at Central New Mexico Community College. A poet as well as a novelist, Horsley has a PhD in American Studies and has published five novels. Her book A Killing in a New Town was the winner of the 1996 Western States Book Award for Fiction.

The Changeling : A Novel. Kate Horsley has never failed to astound me with the books of hers I have read. The Changeling", I feel, is an excellent follow up to her acclaimed novel, "Confessions of a Pagan Nun". The setting is the 1300's in Ireland. Grey is a peasant girl who has been raised as a boy. When she realises her womanhood, it takes her on a journey of discovering an identity. As Ms. Horsley breaks it up for us, "Son", "Whore", "Warrior", and "Mother"

A beautifully written book that revolves around the idea of identity, and how our identites are shaped by the cirucmstances of our lives, both the ones that affect us in small ways in our lives and those of the world at large

A beautifully written book that revolves around the idea of identity, and how our identites are shaped by the cirucmstances of our lives, both the ones that affect us in small ways in our lives and those of the world at large. In fourteenth-century Ireland, Grey is born a female, but due to her father's wanting a boy and threatning to kill a seventh girl, her mother (in collusion with the Midwife) raises her as a boy.

Booktopia has Firstlife, An Everlife Novel : Book 1 by Gena Showalter. The Rebel Wife: A Novel by Taylor M. Polites The Rebel Wife presents a young widow trying to survive in the violent world of Reconstruction Alabama, where the old gentility masks continuing violence fueled by hatred, treachery, and still powerful secrets. Title: The Rebel Wife Author: Taylor M. Polites Pages: 304 Published: 2012 Genre: Historical Fiction, Gothic Fiction Challenges: Hist.

Kate Horsley’s first novel, The Monster’s Wife, was shortlisted for the Scottish First Book of the Year Award. Her poems and short fiction have appeared in a number of magazines and anthologies, including Best British Crime Stories

Kate Horsley’s first novel, The Monster’s Wife, was shortlisted for the Scottish First Book of the Year Award. Her poems and short fiction have appeared in a number of magazines and anthologies, including Best British Crime Stories.

Kate Horsley created a character caught in a world of fierce cultural conflict in her first novel, Crazy Woman

Kate Horsley created a character caught in a world of fierce cultural conflict in her first novel, Crazy Woman. The novel follows the story of Sara Franklin, who is captured by the Apaches. The Changeling of Finnistuath: A Novel is the story of Grey, a fourteenth-century Irish peasant who is raised as a boy after her father declares that if his eighth child is another girl, he will kill her. Grey's mother, who believes in fairies as well as what the priests teach her, convinces herself that Grey could be a changeling, treats her with the special consideration due an only son, and tells her that she must always conceal her body.

Talk about The Changeling: A Novel


Cobyno
This novel has so many aspects in addressing what it means to be a human being. The obvious and primary one is sexual identity. Then there's religious imperialism, specifically how priests from one culture use religious authority to control a local population. And political imperialism, such as when the English colonialized Ireland, and how the English elite lived in luxury while the locals were kept in virtual slavery. The main character in this novel is so noble and yet so human as to be considered possibly too idealistic, but it was easy to relate to her. Overall, it was really quite a fascinating read. After reading this, I went straight to "Confessions of a Pagan Nun" by the same author, and it was also quite good. Ms. Horsley has become one of my favorite authors, and I hope she produces more works of such caliber.
Altad
Very interesting book about an unwanted daughter from a poor family who is made to pretend she is a boy. We follow her in her relationships with the church and how she survives doing what she must to survive. A very informative history of the Church of England and how the British landowners and clergy, as well as the Catholic priests mistreated the Irish. Could this story have really happened I don't know. It was a good read.
Nto
I could not stop reading this book!
Broadraven
I was disappointed in this book. Grey's life didn't really start until about 11 in the story and then was basically skimmed over till she went to the monastery and that was all about "pleasing a few monks" I didn't finish it. I stopped reading about the time she was going to leave the monastery. Quite graphic & crude sex terms.
Fiarynara
A novel about gender is probably doomed to be a novel about sex, though of course the two are different. I was interested in the novel's premise. I've read a few stories about women masquerading as men, but Grey is raised to believe she's a boy. And I do enjoy the idea that this gives her resourcefulness and strength throughout her life, instead of being the occasion of a mental dislocation so severe that it drives her insane (I want to mention a title here but never want to ruin that book by Ian Banks for another reader). But I felt the plot missed the mark.

Better fed, better rested and better loved than her useless sisters, Grey has advantages that lead...nowhere. As soon as her femininity is discovered, it is exploited, and it runs and ruins her life. From boy to whore to mother, this is a predictable path and this is my disappointment. She wanted to be a warrior! I don't know. It seemed like a great opportunity squandered.

Also, though I had to constantly remind me that the pleasures of sex were free and therefore quite important to the peasant class of the 1300s, I got a little tired of the conversations, descriptions and activities always circling back round to the crudest of terms. It seemed like such a shortcut. I wanted to read more about the vagaries and duplicities and possibilities of gender, and less about parts.
Samugor
This amazing book focuses around the the life a woman who truly has an extraordinary life. Born into a poor family, her mother deceives her father and the village by calling Grey a boy. Grey spends her youth believing she is a boy, deformed and must keep her identity a secret. The time is during the 12th century when England is beginning to take over parts of Ireland. Poverty is rampant and the English are gobbling up villages and property and claiming them as their own.

When Grey discovers her true identity, she embarks on a strange journey trying to reconcile the years she spent as a male to the truth of her sex. She goes from being used, to being loved, to becoming a mother, and then continues to change throughout the book.

There were some sections of the book that where I thought "typical - woman is the victim". However, when I put the book down and began to think about it, Grey was a victim according to today's way of thinking. The author does an amazing job at presenting Grey as anything BUT a victim. She is more than just a woman, mother, wife, Irish, peasant, lover. Grey's character shows that there is more to a person then their sex. Someone isn't defined by their "station" in life - wife, mother, woman. Rather who they make themselves.

Great read. Fast paced and well written.
KiddenDan
Kate Horsley has never failed to astound me with the books of hers I have read. "The Changeling", I feel, is an excellent follow up to her acclaimed novel, "Confessions of a Pagan Nun".

The setting is the 1300's in Ireland. Grey is a peasant girl who has been raised as a boy. When she realises her womanhood, it takes her on a journey of discovering an identity. As Ms. Horsley breaks it up for us, "Son", "Whore", "Warrior", and "Mother". Each of her identities and phases teaches her different lessons in life until the end when she realizes that nothing can exactly define her. The themes of the novel are the search for identity and in a stange way glory.

Through Grey's eyes, we see all the problems of the age. Including the residing of the Pope at Avignon, the corruption of the Catholic Church, and the smiting Black Death.

The characteristics Horsley gives to Grey lets us experience what is it to be a woman. I believe this is an important message for not only women all over the world, but men as well. Horsley, through Grey's various identities, gives us the complex psychology of a woman.

This is a beautiful story and just as incredible as "Confessions of a Pagan Nun". Once again, it is about discovering who you are. The smoothness of the writing carries you through the pages one by one until before you realize it, you are done.
I read this book ten years ago and I still think about it often. Loved it.