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by Patrick Curry

Download Defending Middle-Earth: Tolkien: Myth and Modernity ePub
  • ISBN 061847885X
  • ISBN13 978-0618478859
  • Language English
  • Author Patrick Curry
  • Publisher Mariner Books; Reprint edition (October 21, 2004)
  • Pages 210
  • Formats mobi lit docx lrf
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory History and Criticism
  • Size ePub 1232 kb
  • Size Fb2 1553 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 839

What are millions of readers all over the world getting out of reading The Lord of the Rings? Newly reissued with a new afterword, Patrick Curry's Defending Middle-earth argues, in part, that Tolkien has found a way to provide something close to spirit in a secular age. His focus is on three main aspects of Tolkien's fiction: the social and political structure of Middle-earth and how the varying cultures within it find common cause in the face of a shared threat; the nature and ecology of Middle-earth and how what we think of as the natural world joins the battle against mindless, mechanized destruction; and the spirituality and ethics of Middle-earth, for which Curry provides a particularly insightful and resonant examination that will deepen the understanding of the millions of fans who have taken The Lord of the Rings to heart.

Defending Middle Earth: Tolkien: Myth and Modernity by Patrick Curry is an important book which attempts to take a look at the writings of J. R. Tolkien and defend him from some of the attacks made against him by various critics.

Defending Middle Earth: Tolkien: Myth and Modernity by Patrick Curry is an important book which attempts to take a look at the writings of J. Critics have often looked down on Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings trilogy and attempted to pigeonhole Tolkien into various unsavory categories. This book takes a look at Tolkien from an anti-modernist perspective, particularly with reference to his love for nature and the English countryside.

Defending Middle-Earth: Tolkien: Myth and Modernity. Machiavellian is a popular byword for treachery and opportunism

Defending Middle-Earth: Tolkien: Myth and Modernity. Tolkien: A Celebration - Collected Writings on a Literary Legacy. Machiavellian is a popular byword for treachery and opportunism. Machiavelli's classic book on statecraft, The Prince, published over 400 years ago, remains controversial to this day because of its electrifying frankness as a practical guide to power.

Defending Middle-Earth book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Defending Middle-Earth: Tolkien: Myth and Modernity as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. What are millions of readers all over the world getting out.

Patrick Curry’s book shows just how mistaken they are. He reveals Tolkien’s profound and subtle advocacy of community, ecology and spiritual values against the destructive forces of runaway modernity

Patrick Curry’s book shows just how mistaken they are. He reveals Tolkien’s profound and subtle advocacy of community, ecology and spiritual values against the destructive forces of runaway modernity. Tolkien’s remedy, and the project implicit in his literary mythology, is a re-enchantment of the world. In helping us to realize that living nature, including humanity, is sacred, his writings draw on ancient magical mythology, but at the same time resonate closely with the ideas of contemprary radical ecology. Quoting extensively from Tolkien’s works, Patrick Curry argues that Tolkien addresses.

Читать бесплатно текст книги Defending Middle-earth: Tolkien: Myth and Modernity автора Patrick Curry (1-я . I would therefore be astounded, albeit pleasantly so, if my book persuades any of them otherwise; but in any case, it is not really meant for them

I would therefore be astounded, albeit pleasantly so, if my book persuades any of them otherwise; but in any case, it is not really meant for them. May it rather provide a way in for those who come to Tolkien’s books with an open mind, send former readers back to them again, and help those who already love them to appreciate them still more. And if any of the latter have felt ashamed to admit it, may it help you understand why you need do so no longer!)

This book will undoubtedly make more sense if you have already read The Lord of the Rings; but if you have not, or need reminding, here is a very brief synopsis

This book will undoubtedly make more sense if you have already read The Lord of the Rings; but if you have not, or need reminding, here is a very brief synopsis. It takes place in the Third Age of Middle-earth – our Earth, but in an imaginary period a very long time ago. Frodo Baggins of the Shire, where the hobbits live, inherits a magic ring from his uncle Bilbo, who had acquired it from a fallen hobbit, Gollum, in the course of adventures recounted in The Hobbit

Tolkien’s Middle-earth is thus a Europe, as Luling puts it, that has never . It is also striking that the races in Middle-earth are most striking in their variety and autonomy.

Tolkien’s Middle-earth is thus a Europe, as Luling puts it, that has never been ‘Europeanized,’ or, what amounts to the same thing, ‘modernized. And the story of The Lord of the Rings – as reflected in its very title – is about the resistance to just that. Doubtless this has been made possible by setting his books in a place that, while it feels like . Europe, is made strange and wonderful by its imaginary time. I suppose that this could be seen as an unhealthy emphasis on ‘race’; it seems to me rather an assertion of the wonder of multicultural difference.

Defending Middle-Earth : Tolkien: Myth and Modernity. A timely critical analysis of J. Tolkien's masterful trilogy, The Lord of the Rings, addresses the social and political structure of Middle-earth, its nature and ecology, and the spirituality and ethics of Tolkien's world. He reveals Tolkien’s profound and subtle advocacy of community, ecology and spiritual values . Books related to Defending Middle-earth: Tolkien: Myth and Modernity. Tolkien and the Great War: The Threshold of Middle-earth.

Talk about Defending Middle-Earth: Tolkien: Myth and Modernity


Nicanagy
This is a difficult book to rate. Parts of it are very good and very insightful, putting Tolkien in perspective, showing why he's important, and picking apart the misconceptions about his work (such as complaints that it's racist, the characters are either all good or all evil, that it over-romanticizes nature, etc.)

But about a third of the way into the book, the author takes off on an anti-science spiel. Note that I agree with parts of what he says. I consider myself an environmentalist, and I think what we're doing to the environment is horrible. But he makes several key mistakes that annoy me. First off, he confuses science with the push to mechanize everything (though he does try to clarify that at one point). I'm pretty much a science geek, and to me science is learning how the universe works -- everything from Hubble and our space probes to figuring out the underlying structure of matter to Einstein's general relativity. He also seems to want progress to be rolled back, making the claim that it hurts people. I've seen this attitude before, by think it would be nice if they could get rid of the parts they don't like but still have a world where people live decades longer than they used to, don't get polio, etc. We can certainly do better -- more solar power, less coal, for example -- but we can't expect to have a world where we never had the industrial revolution but where we got all the benefits that we liked from it.

This would have been a better book had this tone down a bit. But despite that, it does provide some good insights.
Windworker
An interesting exploration of Tolkien's work: the theme of the book is to "defend" LOTR from its critics, and thereby explore the work itself, as well as Tolkien's writings. A fun read.
Celak
I first saw Patrick Curry on the special features for the Lord of the Rings movies. I was impressed with him then and have enjoyed his book.
Buriwield
This book is a valuable attempt to draw out some of the societal lessons inherent in Tolkien's work. While interesting and at times excellent it suffers from a number of drawbacks. In particular, the Author's lack of sympathy with 'institutional religion', and Roman Catholicism in particular, leaves him at a disadvantage in considering the work of as devout a Roman Catholic as Tolkien undoubtedly was.

It is, at times, also rather too defensive of Tolkien, which distracts from the presentation of the positive argument of the book.

Within these limitations, however, it's a reasonable attempt to extract some valid (& overdue) lessons from Tolkien's work.
Pringles
I've read the Tolkien books at least four times and while I admire scope, scholarship and imagination of them, I don't consider them great literature. The subplots were endless and many of the characters were paper thin. Female characters were few and far between and most often heroic or magical characters. The concerns of everyday people enduring monumental events got short treatment. I never found any deep meaning within them and I think looking something deeper detracts from the achievement and purpose of the books. They are about dragons and elves, good versus absolute evil, wizards and hobbits. Enjoy them for what they were and share them with your children. They should get a chance to read them too instead of just seeing the movies,
Nkeiy
I tend to read criticism and analysis on Tolkien to discover new interpretations and ways of looking at his work; which then makes each time I read his works unique. Defending Middle-Earth succeeds in some respects, but fails in others. Although the author goes to pains in the Afterward to defend his work as "application" and not allegory, I don't think the assertion is quite right. I often thought, as I read this book, that all mention of Tolkien and Middle-Earth could be deleted and the book would still be viable. This was particularly true for me with regards to Curry's discussion on the dangers and pitfalls of Modernity and the threat to nature/ecology. While I agree with the author that these issues were of great import to Tolkien and Middle-Earth, the argument became too much about our own world, with little back-up or reference to Tolkien's writings. There are some clear and interesting insights within this book, but so often they are worked to death...to take a cue from Tolkien's "On Fairy Stories:" at times the tower was whole, and at times crushed to pieces. Too often it felt like I was reading a protest piece, a manifesto for the ills of this world. While I sympathize with these views, it is not what I expected or wanted from this book.

Also, as one reviewer has stated, Curry is eminently obvious in his disregard towards the Christian aspects of The Lord of the Rings. He spends most of the chapter devoted to the spiritual downplaying the Christian nature of the work, attempting, it would seem, to nullify it all together. And yet Tolkien himself defended LotR as a preeminently Catholic work! I was also slightly disgusted with the author's clear lack of understanding regarding Tolkien's views on the veracity of myth as proved through the meeting of Truth and Myth in Jesus Christ. This meeting does not refute all other myth or thought but substantiates it. We were made by God, the Creator, in His likeness. Therefore we are drawn to sub-create. As we are God's children, anything we create is also in the image and likeness of His creation and the ultimate Truth. Possibly Curry's lack of clarity on this topic lies with his lack of respect for the legitimacy of contemporary religion.