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Download Translating Empire: José Martí, Migrant Latino Subjects, and American Modernities (New Americanists) ePub

by Laura Lomas

Download Translating Empire: José Martí, Migrant Latino Subjects, and American Modernities (New Americanists) ePub
  • ISBN 0822343428
  • ISBN13 978-0822343424
  • Language English
  • Author Laura Lomas
  • Publisher Duke University Press Books (January 2, 2009)
  • Pages 400
  • Formats mobi lrf lrf docx
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory History and Criticism
  • Size ePub 1817 kb
  • Size Fb2 1432 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 995

In Translating Empire, Laura Lomas uncovers how late nineteenth-century Latino migrant writers developed a prescient critique of U.S. imperialism, one that prefigures many of the concerns about empire, race, and postcolonial subjectivity animating American studies today. During the 1880s and early 1890s, the Cuban journalist, poet, and revolutionary José Martí and other Latino migrants living in New York City translated North American literary and cultural texts into Spanish. Lomas reads the canonical literature and popular culture of the United States in the Gilded Age through the eyes of Martí and his fellow editors, activists, orators, and poets. In doing so, she reveals how, in the process of translating Anglo-American culture into a Latino-American idiom, the Latino migrant writers invented a modernist aesthetics to criticize U.S. expansionism and expose Anglo stereotypes of Latin Americans.

Lomas challenges longstanding conceptions about Martí through readings of neglected texts and reinterpretations of his major essays. Against the customary view that emphasizes his strong identification with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Walt Whitman, the author demonstrates that over several years, Martí actually distanced himself from Emerson’s ideas and conveyed alarm at Whitman’s expansionist politics. She questions the association of Martí with pan-Americanism, pointing out that in the 1880s, the Cuban journalist warned against foreign geopolitical influence imposed through ostensibly friendly meetings and the promotion of hemispheric peace and “free” trade. Lomas finds Martí undermining racialized and sexualized representations of America in his interpretations of Buffalo Bill and other rituals of westward expansion, in his self-published translation of Helen Hunt Jackson’s popular romance novel Ramona, and in his comments on writing that stereotyped Latino/a Americans as inherently unfit for self-government. With Translating Empire, Lomas recasts the contemporary practice of American studies in light of Martí’s late-nineteenth-century radical decolonizing project.


In Translating Empire, Laura Lomas argues that in New York, at the end of the nineteenth century, José Martí developed the . Translating Empire: Jose Marti, Migrant Latino Subjects, and American Modernities.

In Translating Empire, Laura Lomas argues that in New York, at the end of the nineteenth century, José Martí developed the kind of critique of the United States that American studies has only recently begun to lly, a critique that recasts the United States in terms of its "mutability, comparability, heterogeneity, dependence, indebtedness, and responsibility to a larger community of the Americas. and the planet" (xv). Translating empire: José Martí, Migrant Latino subjects and American modernities by Laura Lomas.

Translating Empire aims to show how indispensable Latino migrant translations have been to the imagining of American cultural and literary history

Translating Empire aims to show how indispensable Latino migrant translations have been to the imagining of American cultural and literary history. Translating Empire aims to show how indispensable Latino migrant translations have been to the imagining of American cultural and literary history

org to approved e-mail addresses.

org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Sociological Analysis of Hajj and Power.

Introduction: Metropolitan debts, imperial modernity, and Latino modernism Latino-American postcolonial theory from a. .On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book.

On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book.

In Translating Empire, Laura Lomas confirms that this practice is alive . Lomas makes two principal claims in her book.

In Translating Empire, Laura Lomas confirms that this practice is alive and well one hundred years after José Martí witnessed and critiqued this monstrous imperial modernity in the late nineteenth century.

Through a series of adept, beautifully wrought readings, Translating Empiresituates Marti’s rigorous project from a postcolonial perspective and traces his critique of an Anglo-dominant Modernism.

Mart?, Migrant Latino Subjects, and American Modernities. In Translating Empire, Laura Lomas uncovers how late nineteenth-century Latino migrant writers developed a prescient critique of .

Translating empire: José Martí, migrant Latino subjects, and American modernities. Translating Empire: Jos Mart. Migrant Latino Subjects, and American, 2008. Duke University Press, 2008. The Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature. JM González, L Lomas. Cambridge University Press, 2018. Thinking-Across, Infiltration, and Transculturation: José Martí's Theory and Practice of Post-Colonial Translation in New York. José Martí Between Nation and Empire: Latino Cultural Critique at the Intersection of the Americas.

Translating Empire book. imperialism, one that prefigures many of the concerns about empire, race, and postcolonial subjectivity animating American studies today.

Migration and Decolonial Politics in. Two Afro-Latino Poets: Pachn Marn and Tato Laviera Laura Lomas. Rutgers University, Newark. Laura Lomas is Associate Professor of English and American Studies, Rutgers University, Newark. She is the author of Translating Empire: Jos Mart, Migrant Latino Subjects and American Modernities (2008). She serves on the Board of the Recovering the . Hispanic Literary Heritage Project. Francisco Gonzalo Pachn Marn (18631897), Afro-Puertorriqueo, exiled poet, typesetter, journalist, and revolutionary, belongs to an AfroLatina/o tradition in the late nineteenth century that opened a pathway.

Talk about Translating Empire: José Martí, Migrant Latino Subjects, and American Modernities (New Americanists)


Danskyleyn
An excellent, eloquent book on a very important Cuban thinker; her criticism offers a different way to think of Marti's work, his time, and his contemporaries.
KiddenDan
Those who are considering this work should read the excellent review (available online) by Alfred Lopez. The Lopez critique points to problematic aspects that reviewers less familar with José Martí and less aware of the mistranslations from Spanish have missed. There are many factual errors throughout the text. Overall, this is a very disappointing treatment of an important literary and cultural figure whose life and works link the United States and Cuba.
Bluecliff
Translating Empire is a painstakingly researched, brilliantly realized book, a model of scholarship that builds on, challenges, and expands longstanding perspectives and practices of reading. It must be noted that the lone negative review by Alfred López cited previously is far from disinterested, sweepingly characterizing Lomas's book as at once representative of "almost all new Americanist scholarship on Martí," of comparative postcolonialist literary criticism more broadly, and of interdisciplinary literary studies even more broadly (López 283). The regionalist's overt possessiveness of his subject matter in that isolated review helps us see why new perspectives such as Lomas's are needed and warmly welcomed by a preponderance of accomplished scholars and informed readers, as the glowing responses quoted above attest.
Winawel
Laura Lomas writes that "Martí admonished the celebrated general [Máximo Gómez] for his antidemocratic suppression of the dynamic, participatory political process that Martí fervently advocated." Yet she faults the preeminent Martí historian Carlos Ripoll for "implying, anachronistically, that Martí stood against the kind of revolution propounded by Fidel Castro." She does not, however, fault Castro or his apologists for asserting (not implying), also anachronistically, that Martí stood for the kind of revolution propounded by Fidel Castro. It would be a calumny to suppose that Martí would ever sanction a 52-year dictatorship which deprived the Cuban people of all civic and human rights and returned the island to the dynastic rule of one family. If the Bourbons were unacceptable to Martí, then the Castros, who do not practice their despotism at a distance and do not merely reign but rule, would have been even more objectionable if only because they were Cubans. Every wrong imputed to the Spanish Crown in the 19th century finds its parallel in the Castro regime, and, in every instance, its culmination as well. Why would it be wrong, then, for Ripoll or anyone else to use Martí's authority to attack tyranny, in whatever guise or in whatever age it appears, is a question that Lomas leaves unanswered because it does not admit of an answer: it is easier to accuse Ripoll of "implying anachronistically" what she herself has not the intellectual honesty to admit even when the failure to recognize that Martí stood against tyranny makes her unfit to comment on Martí's life or to expound on the meaning of his writings, exercises which she does not seem to realize are just as necessarily anachronistic. (My apologies to Prof. Lomas if, unbeknownst to me, she has developed a time machine).