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Download Melmoth the Wanderer (Oxford World's Classics) ePub

by Douglas Grant,Chris Baldick,Charles Maturin

Download Melmoth the Wanderer (Oxford World's Classics) ePub
  • ISBN 0199540292
  • ISBN13 978-0199540297
  • Language English
  • Author Douglas Grant,Chris Baldick,Charles Maturin
  • Publisher Oxford University Press; 1 edition (August 1, 2008)
  • Pages 592
  • Formats lrf lit txt doc
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory History and Criticism
  • Size ePub 1469 kb
  • Size Fb2 1801 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 597

Written by an eccentric Anglican curate in Dublin, Melmoth Wanderer brought the terrors of the Gothic novel to a new pitch of claustrophobic intensity. Its tormented villain, a Faustian transgressor desperately seeking a victim to release him from his fatal bargain with the devil, regarded by Balzac as one of the great outcasts of modern literature.About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Unfortunately, Maturin can't reign in his impulsiveness and the work drifts off into a series of digressions that end up testing the patience of even the most earnest reader

Only 18 left in stock (more on the way). Unfortunately, Maturin can't reign in his impulsiveness and the work drifts off into a series of digressions that end up testing the patience of even the most earnest reader. If you think Poe is overly wordy, just trust me in saying he has nothing on Maturin.

Melmoth the Wanderer (Oxford World's Classics).

Oxford World's Classics. Melmoth the Wanderer. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Chris Baldick (Introduction). Melmoth the Wanderer (Paperback). Published 1968 by Oxford University Press. Oxford World's Classics, Reprint, Paperback, 560 pages. Author(s): Charles Robert Maturin. ISBN: 0199540292 (ISBN13: 9780199540297). ISBN: 0192835920 (ISBN13: 9780192835925).

Maturin, Charles Robert. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press. Maturin, Charles Robert. Australian/Harvard Citation.

Charles Robert Maturin, also known as C. R. Maturin (25 September 1780 – 30 October 1824), was an Irish Protestant clergyman (ordained in the Church of Ireland) and a writer of Gothic plays and novels. His best known work is the novel Melmoth the Wanderer. Maturin was descended from Huguenots who found shelter in Ireland, one of whom was Gabriel Jacques Maturin who became Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin after Jonathan Swift in 1745.

Oxford University Press. Серия: Oxford World's Classics. Charles Sisson's blank verse translation is remarkable for its lucidity and vigour, and the Introduction, diagrams, maps, and notes by David Higgins provide the reader with invaluable guidance

Oxford University Press. Charles Sisson's blank verse translation is remarkable for its lucidity and vigour, and the Introduction, diagrams, maps, and notes by David Higgins provide the reader with invaluable guidance. Described variously as the greatest poem of the European Middle Ages and, because of the author's evangelical purpose, the & Gospel', the Divine Comedy is central to the.

Oxford World's Classics (Paperback). Written by an eccentric Anglican curate, Melmoth the Wanderer (1820) brought the terrors of the Gothic novel to a new fever pitch of intensity. Its tormented villain seeks a victim to release from his fatal pact with the devil, and Maturin's bizarre narrative structure whirls the reader from rural Ireland to an idyllic Indian island, from a London madhouse to the dungeons of the Spanish inquisition.

Written by. Charles Maturin. View all Melmoth the Wanderer (Oxford World's Classics) lists. Books of Horror - The Classics (34 items) list by jaytoast. 1,001 Books You Must Read Before You Die (1001 items) list by dctclibrary. Manufacturer: Oxford University Press, USA Release date: 1 August 2008 ISBN-10 : 0199540292 ISBN-13: 9780199540297.

Melmoth the Wanderer' Oxford World Classics by Charles Maturin. Chris Baldick, Ormskirk author of 'In Frankenstein's Shadow', is Senior Lecturer in English, Edge Hill College of Higher Education. This copy is in a new condition with no missing or damaged pages. Read full description. Country of Publication.

Talk about Melmoth the Wanderer (Oxford World's Classics)


Malann
Not the full version, that is what makes this review a 4 stars one; however, if I have to give my opinion of the complete version I would say that it is wonderful, one of the most astonishing books I have ever read. Despite its unlikeness to modern novels --sticked to a single narrative, linear most of the times -- this thick volume does keep suspense to the full and makes the reader shiver due to its horrific descriptions of the unknown and the unutterable... Somebody has called this book a Quixote --I couldn't agree more -- for this novel is closer to the origin of the novel than today's novels. One of the subtlest characteristics of it is the continous dialogue with classical literature -- what makes it even more delightful and enigmatic--.
Bearus
The story has all the conventions of Gothic horror: a stranger travels to a strange place, there is an old mysterious house, the people are all oddly superstitious and something is not quite right.

At times the book is gripping, especially when you get little peeks into Melmoth's vestigial humanity but it is also often filled with pages that can either be skimmed or skipped entirely. The plot shifts back and forth between the present and the past and sometimes isn't completely clear as to when the events are occurring.

Melmoth as a character is slightly archetypal, resembling the Wandering Jew of Medieval Christian folklore and is sufficiently haunting. I enjoyed the mystery surrounding him and it's a fun October read, leading up to Halloween.

The book is a little long and the author could have used a better editor, and perhaps another iteration or two to hone the story, but he has a good imagination and the plot effectively uses traditional Gothic conventions to create a sense of foreboding.

If you're a fan of Gothic literature or a student of 19th century writing then you will very likely enjoy it. Otherwise, you will probably find yourself putting the book down and moving to something else.
Weetont
I am new to Gothic literature. I recently read "The Monk," and enjoyed it so much I decided to try some more. I liked "Dracula" but Radcliffe's sobbing Emily in the "Mysteries of Uldopho" left me cold. So I tried the Melmoth. This book has everything. It stars Melmoth the Wanderer who made a deal with the devil and wanders the earth looking for someone to take the bargain off his hands. The protestant anti-catholicism that runs through the Monk is twice as entertaining in Melmoth as in "The Monk" and the depictions of depraved clergy are even better. Some of Melmoth's screeds against, Catholicism, Christianity itself, and all human endeavor sounded too sincere for me to believe that it didn't come from some dark place in the heart of the apparently religious author.

I thought the nested stories would annoy me, but they didn't. The stories are not hard to follow, although as others have noted, Maturin can go on a bit. They say this is the last of the Gothic novels. I can see why. Melmoth killed the genre. After Melmoth, there was nothing left to say.
Syleazahad
This novel starts out brilliantly. The initial setting and "setup" is genuinely eerie and unsettling. Unfortunately, Maturin can't reign in his impulsiveness and the work drifts off into a series of digressions that end up testing the patience of even the most earnest reader. If you think Poe is overly wordy, just trust me in saying he has nothing on Maturin. An apter title might have been "Melmoth the Meanderer," as the verbiage sinks into a gothic quagmire of excess and the plot(s) lose all semblence of cohesion, reflecting the descent into madness of the novel's main protagonist, which, I know one might argue, is actually a rather postmodern thing, but I think that is giving Maturin a lot more credit than he warrants.

I will say that when I first approached this novel when I was in college and was researching dark romantic and gothic literature I was a lot more receptive and could more willingly suspend my disbelief. But in retrospect, there are a lot better novels written at approximately the same period that are a lot more accomplished. The nearest in terms of theme and genre is The Manuscript Found in Saragossa by Jan Potocki. It offers up the same sort of delusional, scattered psyche type of presentation, with similarly numerous digressions and convolutions, yet Potocki pulls it all off in a much more accomplished manner, owing to a superior mastery of storytelling and a knack for creating actual suspense, not to mention his superior verbal artistry.

Then there are the more well known 19th c "horror novels", such as Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto, available in an inexpensive Kindle edition, and Ann Radcliffe's complete works, available in a Delphi edition on this site, all of which provide better written examples of Dark Romanticism and Gothic Lit than Maturin provides.
Cemav
While I did enjoy this book, the best advice I can give is to be sure to read the introduction - it will prepare you for the rather dense writing ahead. This is a layered story, and it is sometimes to recall just where one is within it.
Fog
All that can be said has probably already been said eloquently by the other reviewers, so I just want to add my five stars to what has been one of the most influential books I have ever read. Maturin succeeds in perfecting sublime and horrific imagery, so prevalent in Gothic lore, to carry across his message (which is best gleaned from the book itself, so I won't go into any details). The dark miasma that weaves and builds through the tale makes this work of art greater than the sum of its parts, though its parts are pretty awesome too, and stays with the reader ever after. In other words, it does what a book should always do, but rarely accomplishes. And it changed the way I view the world. Exquisite writing by a master of prose.