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Download Ariel'S Gift: A Commentary on Birthday Letters by Ted Hughes ePub

by Erica Wagner

Download Ariel'S Gift: A Commentary on Birthday Letters by Ted Hughes ePub
  • ISBN 0571200850
  • ISBN13 978-0571200856
  • Language English
  • Author Erica Wagner
  • Publisher Faber & Faber; First Edition edition (April 3, 2000)
  • Pages 240
  • Formats mobi doc lrf lit
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory History and Criticism
  • Size ePub 1567 kb
  • Size Fb2 1325 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 521

When Ted Hughes's Birthday Letters was published in 1998, it was greeted with astonishment and acclaim. Few suspected that Ted Hughes had been at work, for a quarter of a century, on a cycle of poems addressed almost entirely to his first wife, the American poet Sylvia Plath. In Ariel's Gift, Erica Wagner provides a commentary to the poems in Birthday Letters, pointing the reader towards the events that shaped them, and, crucially, showing how they draw upon Sylvia Plath's own work.

Wagner, Erica, 1967-.

Wagner, Erica, 1967-. Literature, Poets in literature, Marriage, Birthday letters (Hughes), Lyrik, Hughes, Ted, 1930-1998 - Marriage, Hughes, Ted, 1930-1998. Birthday letters, Plath, Sylvia - Marriage, Plath, Sylvia - In literature, Plath, Sylvia, Hughes, Ted, 1930-1998, Hughes, Ted. "Birthday letters", Marriage in literature, Birthday letters (Hughes, Ted). Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station16. cebu on January 4, 2020. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

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When poet Ted Hughes offered Birthday Letters for publication in 1997 . Ariel's Gift left me ambivalent. I appreciated Wagner’s attempt to be fair to both Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath.

In this book, author Erica Wagner examines the dialog between Ariel and Birthday Letters, and Wagner insists that Ted Hughes is not mimicking but rather responding to Sylvia Plath. No real insight, and kind of a survey, although there were some interesting details and comparisons.

Published 2000 by Faber and Faber in London. Ted Hughes (1930-1998), Sylvia Plath. Check nearby libraries.

When Ted Hughes's Birthday Letters was published in 1998, it was .

When Ted Hughes's Birthday Letters was published in 1998, it was greeted with astonishment and acclaim, immediately landing on the bestseller list. Few suspected that Hughes had been at work for a quarter of a century on this cycle of poems addressed to his first wife, Sylvia Plath. In Ariel's Gift, Erica Wagner explores the destructive relationship between these two poets through their lives and their writings.

A study of Ted Hughes's poetry collection, Birthday Letters. Divided into ten sections, the book discusses groups of poems as well as giving a biographical framework to the whole sequence. It also offers an explanation of the connections between Hughes's work and that of Sylvia Plath.

Ted Hughes's "Birthday letters", published in 1998, was greeted with astonishment and acclaim. Ted Hughes, Sylvia Plath and the Story of Birthday Letters.

Ted Hughes's Birthday letters, published in 1998, was greeted with astonishment and acclaim. Erica Wagner was born in New York City in 1967.

In Ariel's Gift, Erica Wagner explores the destructive relationship between these two poets through their lives and their writings. Both narratively engaging and scholastically comprehensive. ―Thomas Lynch, Los Angeles Times "Wagner has set the poems of Hughes's Birthday Letters in the context of his marriage to Plath with great delicacy. ―Times Literary Supplement 8 pages of b/w photographs.

Talk about Ariel'S Gift: A Commentary on Birthday Letters by Ted Hughes


Cointrius
In this book, author Erica Wagner examines the dialog between Ariel and Birthday Letters, and Wagner insists that Ted Hughes is not mimicking but rather responding to Sylvia Plath. No real insight, and kind of a survey, although there were some interesting details and comparisons. The biographical bits were the most fantasizing parts of the book. There are times, very early in the book, where Wagner’s syntax was confusing, attempting to sound complex and intelligent. I can say the book was at least readable.

If one wants an account of how Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath inspired each other’s work, I highly recommend Diane Middlebrook’s Her Husband, which is brilliant, very well-written, entertaining, and insightful. Now, that was an addictive, engrossing read.

The best thing I can say about Wagner’s book is that I wanted to reread Birthday Letters. I don’t find Ted Hughes to be a particularly skillful wordsmith – certainly industrious (due to his long career), but after my first reading of Birthday Letters, I thought his writing immature, desperate, and dull. (And honestly, I was befuddled by the rave reviews. I even thought I could have written better. And within a week.) But with the addition of Wagner’s criticism, I tried to appreciate Ted Hughes’s point of view.

Ariel's Gift left me ambivalent. I appreciated Wagner’s attempt to be fair to both Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath. But Wagner didn’t make any definite statements. There were tentative observations, and the book was one onerous pondering.
MOQ
was not aware that this would be a library book. Some of the photo pages have fallen out but otherwise an excellent read!
Olelifan
Ariel's Gift should interest anyone who likes Ted Hughes's and/or Sylvia Plath's work. The author, Erica Wagner, is a London Times journalist who edited some of the poems in Hughes's cycle about his marriage with Plath-- Birthday Letters-- when the Times published them in 1998. She provides a lucid, fair-minded commentary on one of the twentieth century's most complicated and controversial literary phenomena. She doesn't "take sides" on their marriage and its tragic consequences, although, since she is mainly commenting on Hughes's version of it, she tends to see things through his eyes. But she is well-versed in Plath's work, and not afraid to question Hughes's view of events.
Readers will inevitably disagree with her on various things. I found her classification of their respective poetic characters-- Hughes the nature poet; Plath the feminist-mythologue-- conventionally over-simplistic. Plath had as much empathy for nature as Hughes, but less compulsion to control it; Hughes was certainly a mythologue and had a lot of sympathy for feminism, which rather frightened Plath because of her compulsion to be a wife and mother. Wagner also displays some confusion about American geography-- she places "Fishing Bridge," one of Birthday Letters' central poems, "in Wisconsin by the edge of Lake Superior" instead of at Yellowstone Lake in Yellowstone National Park where the actual Fishing Bridge is located.
Would Hughes and/or Plath have liked this book? They'd probably have liked it more than a lot of stuff that's been written about them. It's certainly one of the most perceptive and fair-minded studies of their poetic mythology, as opposed to the journalistic sensationalism that has parasitized it. It is too bad, and surprising, that Wagner's book hasn't got more attention-- it bridges the gap between popular and academic interest. Or perhaps not so surprising given the level of the journalistic sensationalism, which still gets a lot of attention.