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Download Tales of Times Now Past: 62 Stories from Medieval Japanese Collection (English and Japanese Edition) ePub

Download Tales of Times Now Past: 62 Stories from Medieval Japanese Collection (English and Japanese Edition) ePub
  • ISBN 0520054679
  • ISBN13 978-0520054677
  • Language English Japanese
  • Publisher Univ of California Pr (April 1, 1985)
  • Pages 210
  • Formats azw lit mobi mbr
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory History and Criticism
  • Size ePub 1896 kb
  • Size Fb2 1827 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 938

Tales of Times Now Past: 62 Stories from Medieval Japanese Collection

Japanese Tales from Times Past: Stories of. .- The Konjaku Tales: from a Medieval Japanese Collection. Most translations of the Konjaku into English or Modern Japanese focus exclusively on the stories from Japan.

Japanese Tales from Times Past: Stories of Fantasy and Folklore from the Konjaku Monogatari Shu (90 Stories Included). The idea here is that people interested in Indian or Chinese stories would rather read them directly from Indian or Chinese sources.

m, Short stories, Japanese - Translations into English, Short stories, English - Translations from .

m, Short stories, Japanese - Translations into English, Short stories, English - Translations from Japanese. Berkeley, CA : London : University of California Press for the Center for Japanese and Korean Studies University of California. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Start by marking Tales of Times Now Past: Sixty-Two . This book gave me an appreciation for the wealth of Japanese literature and its long history.

Start by marking Tales of Times Now Past: Sixty-Two Stories from a Medieval Japanese Collection as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Konjaku Monogatarishū (今昔物語集, lit. Anthology of Tales from the Past), also known as the Konjaku Monogatari (今昔物語), is a Japanese collection of over one thousand tales written during the late Heian period (794–1185). The entire collection was originally contained in 31 volumes, of which 28 remain today. The volumes cover various tales from India, China and Japan.

Oops-it’s past time for NextDay delivery by tomorrow. A translation of sixty-two key stories from the Konjaku Monogatari. Michigan Classics in Japanese Studies No. 9. Specifications. Michigan Classics in Japanese Studies. University of Michigan Press.

The twelfth-century Konjaku monogatari shu (Collection of tales from times now past) is the greatest work of Japanese setsuwa bungaku (tale literature), a genre that flourished between the ninth and thirteenth centuries but traces back to Japan’s earliest extant text, the eighth-century Kojiki (Records of Ancient Matters). Past: Sixty-Two Stories from a Medieval Japanese Collection (1979), Yoshiko Kurata Dykstra’s The Konjaku Tales, Indian Section (1986), and others.

Study Tales of Times Now Past: 62 Stories from Medieval Japanese Collection discussion and chapter questions and find Tales of Times Now Past.

Study Tales of Times Now Past: 62 Stories from Medieval Japanese Collection discussion and chapter questions and find Tales of Times Now Past: 62 Stories from Medieval Japanese Collection study guide questions and answers. Tales of Times Now Past: 62 Stories from Medieval Japanese Collection. Marian Ury. ISBN: 0520054679.

Volume 40 Issue 4. Tales of .The Journal of Asian Studies.

Now Past : Sixty-Two Stories from a Medieval Japanese Collection.

Tales of Times Now Past : Sixty-Two Stories from a Medieval Japanese Collection. Tales of Times Now Past presents a brief (less than 200 page) selection of stories from the enormous (5 volume) medieval Japanese collection, Konjaku Monogatari. Buddhist tales from India and China are included, as well as a few anecdotes of Zhuangzi.

oceedings{Brazell1980TalesOT, title {Tales of Times Now Past: Sixty-Two Stories from a Medieval Japanese Collection}, author {Karen Brazell and Marian Ury}, year {1980} }. Karen Brazell, Marian Ury. View via Publisher.

Talk about Tales of Times Now Past: 62 Stories from Medieval Japanese Collection (English and Japanese Edition)


KiddenDan
Some of these tales are wild. Very entertaining read. In case anyone doesn't know, this is an anthology of short to medium-length tales, so it's not a novel with one story.
Blackbeard
Entertaining, scary, and enlightening.
Dondallon
The complete Konjaku Monogatari is indeed a "huge multi-volume text," as the last reviewer states; but the selection is certainly NOT "rather unorthodox." Professor Ury based her translations on the standard 5-volume text of the Nihon Koten Bungaku Taikei (NKBT) series, and her selections are carefully proportionate to the four main divisions into which the thirty-one "chapters" of stories are classified: "Tales of India," "Tales of China,""Tales of Buddhism in Japan," and "Secular Tales of Japan." It should be noted that the famous "Tale of Genji" in the same series also occupies 5 volumes. (A quick check by ruler shows the Konjaku to be the larger of the two!)

In her 5 + 25 page introduction Ury provides the reader with a concise but very detailed and well-informed analysis of the setsuwa genre, as well as the contents, sources, religious beliefs, and a select bibliography of important Western and Japanese works on the Konjaku. It could not have been better written. Ury's Tales has been the standard introduction in English to the Konjaku since it was first published in 1979, and will probably remain so for the foreseeable future.

[It seems very likely, based on the following note which came to my attention, that Yoshiko Kurata Dykstra, another prominent scholar of setsuwa, may already have published a COMPLETE translation of the Konjaku:

--- The Konjaku Tales: from a Medieval Japanese Collection. 5 vols. Intercultural Research Institute monograph series no. 17-18, 23, 25, 27. Osaka: Kansai University of Foreign Studies, 1986-. Complete translation: Indian Section, Part 1/Part 2; Chinese Section; Japanese Section, Part 1/Part 2. ---

I cannot verify this sketchy information and have asked Amazon for help. Unfortunately, a work published in Osaka may have difficulty finding its way into normal distribution channels in the West.]

The text of Ury's translation is 199 pages (including the 25-page introduction and a number of illustrations from a Japanese edition of 1720) in a convenient handbook measuring 8 1/2" X 5 1/2", with Footnotes actually at the FOOT of the page. It is hard to understand how one reader finds this book to be "very long and sometimes hard to follow," and, indeed "extremely long." A small paperback of 199 pages?

I recommend this book enthusiastically and without reservation!
Vaua
I haven't taken the time yet to compare the translations to the Japanese versions,but going just on memory the translations appear to be pretty good.
Of course there are some things I would have translated differently. For example, in many cases the word "daija" (literally "big snake") should be translated into English as "dragon" (even though it's commonly used in modern Japanese for its literal meaning). But this is something that a translator probably wouldn't know unless they were a student of Japanese cryptozoology.
The Konjaku Monogatari is a huge multi-volume text. The first chapters involve Indian tales, the next few chapters involve Chinese tales, and the second half is devoted to Japanese tales. The really interesting thing about stories reported in the Japanese tales, is not that they were all supposedly "true stories", but rather the fact that they involved not only tales told by the aristocrasy or the clergy, but also tales told amongst the peasants.
(My favorite, volume 27, is devoted to ghost stories.)
It is of serious interest to anyone interested in ancient Japanese folkore and thought patterns.
It is difficult to find translations into Enlish, or even into Modern Japanese. For this reason alone, a true Japanophile should grab any translation they can get their hands on for the collector's value alone.
In regards to the story selection of this book, I must say it's rather unorthodox. Most translations of the Konjaku into English or Modern Japanese focus exclusively on the stories from Japan. The idea here is that people interested in Indian or Chinese stories would rather read them directly from Indian or Chinese sources. OTOH, the author's story selection could still prove to be of use to people who are trying to study the spread of Indian and Chinese legends to Japan. However, people looking just for Japanese folkore could be disappointed in this purchase if not forewarned.