derrierloisirs.fr
» » The Broken Tower: A Life of Hart Crane

Download The Broken Tower: A Life of Hart Crane ePub

by Paul Mariani

Download The Broken Tower: A Life of Hart Crane ePub
  • ISBN 0393047261
  • ISBN13 978-0393047264
  • Language English
  • Author Paul Mariani
  • Publisher W W Norton & Co Inc; 1st edition (April 1, 1999)
  • Pages 492
  • Formats mobi lrf docx mbr
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory History and Criticism
  • Size ePub 1289 kb
  • Size Fb2 1341 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 412

The award-winning author of Lost Puritan and A New World Naked presents a close-up look at the turbulent and tragically short life of American poet Hart Crane, from his youth, to his turbulent life amid the New York gay scene, to his suicide at the age of thirty-two.

Hart Crane's life is the purest, saddest fable of the artist's fate. So with my interest piqued, I decided to reread Mariani's The Broken Tower.

Hart Crane's life is the purest, saddest fable of the artist's fate. He was our American Orpheus, our ecstatic visionary savaged by demons. With a rare sympathy and a vivid narrative, Paul Mariani's new and much-needed biography illuminates the poet's energies and pathos, the arching, aching firework of his astonishing career.

The Broken Tower book. I suspect Hart Crane's life is one that resists biography, making Paul Mariani's task a tall one. Still, The Broken Tower struck me as particularly slapdash at times, merely a retelling, via paraphrase, of Crane's own letters to various individuals over the course of his life. Due to his reliance on the letters, Mariani's narrative, though chronological in the larger sense, is not always within and between individual episodes, which can make them feel like non-sequiturs.

One interesting minor theme running though the book is Crane’s unstinting admiration, early and late, for the lesson and practice of Wallace Stevens, whose ear for connotation and nuance, whose indirectness, whose strict poetic discipline, and above all whose sense of the still-unspent spiritual power of the poetic imagination, is akin to Crane’s own.

Crane is the subject of The Broken Tower, a 2011 American student film by the actor James Franco who . He loosely based his script on Paul Mariani's 1999 nonfiction book The Broken Tower: A Life of Hart Crane.

Crane is the subject of The Broken Tower, a 2011 American student film by the actor James Franco who wrote, directed, and starred in the film which was the Master thesis project for his MFA in filmmaking at New York University. Despite being a student film, The Broken Tower was shown at the Los Angeles Film Festival in 2011 and received DVD distribution in 2012 by Focus World Films. Crane appears as a character in Samuel R. Delany's novella "Atlantis: Model 1924",.

He was all of 3. ublished in 1999, Mariani's biography commenmorates the Centennial of Crane's birth.

Few poets have lived as extraordinary and fascinating a life as Hart Crane, the American poet who made his meteoric rise in the late 1920s and then as suddenly flamed out, killing himself at the age of thirty-two and thus turning his life and poetry into the stuff of myth. He was all of 3. The poetic focus of the book is The Bridge. some critics see White Buildings as the stronger, more representative part of Crane's work.

The Broken Tower Lyrics. The bell-rope that gathers God at dawn Dispatches me as though I dropped down the knell Of a spent day - to wander the cathedral lawn From pit to crucifix, feet chill on steps from hell. And builds, within, a tower that is not stone (Not stone can jacket heaven) - but slip Of pebbles, - visible wings of silence sown In azure circles, widening as they dip. The matrix of the heart, lift down the eye That shrines the quiet lake and swells a tower.

Book Format: Paperback

Book Format: Paperback. Written by award-winning biographer Paul Mariani, "The Broken Tower" reads with all the drama of a psychological novel and the inexorable force of a Greek tragedy. Few poets have lived as extraordinary and fascinating life as Hart Crane, the American poet who made his meteoric rise in the late 1920s and then flamed out just as suddenly, killing himself at the age of 32. 34 photos.

Written by award-winning biographer Paul Mariani, "The Broken Tower" reads with all .

Written by award-winning biographer Paul Mariani, "The Broken Tower" reads with all the drama of a psychological novel and the inexorable force of a Greek tragedy.

Talk about The Broken Tower: A Life of Hart Crane


Nten
They speak of 'suffering for art' and in one sense, Hart Crane proves this to be the case. But in another, Crane's is a story of art being perhaps a side effect of suffering. A tragic, but interesting story. Also a good way to understand urban life in the 1920's. I have never read his poetry but was more interested in the story, I will go and read The Bridge now.
Blacknight
Very well written. A must for Hart Crane poetry lovers.
Eyalanev
When Mariani gets deep into discussion of particular poems, his language often becomes so compressed and allusive that it reads like a diary of Mariani's own history with Crane's poetry. And like many diaries, it is simply not understandable to an outsider.

I expect that Mariani does not want to reduce the richness and complexity of Crane's work, and this is admirable. I also think that perhaps he expects his readers to have read at least one of the earlier biographies of Crane. And perhaps an English Ph.D. would follow more of Mariani's un-explicated allusions than I did (though I have done some graduate work in English). But I was often frustrated by this book, because while Mariani clearly knows a great deal about Crane's work and its literary and biographical contexts, he often fails to explain what he knows in a way that can be understood.
KiddenDan
Hart Crane did live long. He took his own life at a early age of 33. This book is a collection of letters written by Crain to his friend. I didn't expect it to be a day by day dictation of his 33 years? One year one chapter. Was interesting to read of gay life at the turn of the last century. Many similarities to today. Cruising the bars picking up sailors. Sponging off mom and dad forever. Parents then as now pay money to their gay children to keep them away. Worked for me till I was 30.
Samulkis
Excellent service and delivered as described
HelloBoB:D
The Broken Tower: Paul Mariani

I was somewhat surprised to read that actor James Franco's upcoming new movie is based on Professor Paul Mariani's biography of Hart Crane, The Broken Tower. I wondered why Franco would want to play the role of a poet most readers of poetry find far too opaque even to attempt to decode; his masterpiece, The Bridge, is a poem that for most of us needs to be read and studied with a learned guide, one like Mariani. I had read Mariani's biography of Crane when it was first published in 1999. It was not the first of Mariani's biographies I'd read: I read his definitive biography of William Carlos Williams, a masterpiece of research; his biography of Robert Lowell as well as his biography of John Berryman. I knew he was without doubt America's finest biographer of poets, as well as a fine poet himself. I also knew him to be a dazzling teacher, having studied with him one summer, and finally I knew him to be one of our finest critics of poetry, the equal of Dr. Helen Vendler with whom I also studied.
And now out of nowhere, his biography of Hart Crane has now been made into a movie staring one of Hollywood's hottest young actors, who, by the way, is seeking a doctorate in English literature. So with my interest piqued, I decided to reread Mariani's The Broken Tower. I noticed other reviewers have taken Mariani to task for some minor errors, about which I could care less. Few books enter the world without mistakes. His are not major. What is major is his knowledge and appreciation of the life of a complicated, brilliant poet who was also an alcoholic and a homosexual. Not once in the whole biography is Mariani judgmental about either issue. He treats Crane as he would any other man, his drinking and sexuality not condemned, not even a smidgen of criticism, this from a Catholic writer who also teaches at a Catholic college. For such objectivity I must applaud Mariani--not all biographers are objective!
I cannot help comparing Mariani with Helen Vendler. She is a brilliant critic but her approach to poetry is quite different from Mariani's. She cuts open a poem with the precision of a surgeon whereas Mariani employs his critical skills as a stethoscope, listening for the heartbeat of a poem. And this is splendidly apparent in The Broken Tower: he not only admires Crane's poetry but he also loves it, and he is not afraid to wear his own heart on his sleeve. And as a reader, I too, on my second reading, have now come to admire Crane. Because of Mariani's sensitivity to Crane's difficult, tortured life and his illuminating exegesis of his poetry, especially that of the very difficult The Bridge (meant to be a "mystical synthesis of America"), I want again to return to Crane, to give him another read because I never really won an understanding of his verse. It is difficult verse, but Mariani has proven to me, at least, that Crane is indeed one of our greatest poets, and we Americans should value him. There was a time in our history when we did not value Walt Whitman, but matters in that regard have suffered a tremendous sea change, and Crane is the true heir of Whitman, so I must take up the challenge to read him.
Finally, I now understand why Franco wants to act the role of Crane. Mariani captures the poet's dramatic, turbulent life, his alcoholic binges, his Dionysian parties, his winning charm and good looks, his conflicted relationship with his parents, his many love affairs and liaisons, his friendships with some of our finest artists, including Eugene O'Neill, Allen Tate and the photographer Stieglitz, and many others. And above all, he captures his devotion to his art: for Crane, life's meaning was to be discovered in poetry, and like a devout priest, he dedicated his life to his "divinity": the poem.
To return briefly to the issue of Crane's homosexuality. Mariani so sensitively and non-judgmentally addresses it, that it makes me wonder why he did not do the same with his last biography, of Gerard Manley Hopkins, in which he pretty much ignores the priest/poet's homosexuality. I wish he hadn't. His is still a fine biography, but it does not address the whole man, which is what he accomplishes with Crane in The Broken Tower, a biography I feel readers will find fascinating. Mariani knows how to make a poet and his verse come alive--
Robert Waldron, author of The Secret Dublin Diary of Gerard Manley Hopkins
mr.Mine
In a short, wild, and mostly unhappy life, Harold Hart Crane (1899-1932) became -- Hart Crane -- a major figure in 20th Century American poetry whose reputation has grown with time. His life became the stuff of legend. Hart Crane left an unhappy home at the age of 17 to live in New York City and follow his dream to become a poet. Without any formal education -- he did not finish high school -- he used his inborn gifts and wide reading to quickly become important to New York's literary culture and community. His first book, White Buildings, is a collection of short, difficult imagistic poetry. His second book, The Bridge, is a lengthy poem offering a mystic, highly personal account of America, its past and its future, using the Brooklyn Bridge is its chief symbol.
Crane's life was one of excess. From late adolesence, Crane drank heavily. He spent a great deal of time in underworld sex picking up sailors in the harbors of New York, all the while trying to conceal his sexual identity from his parents. Towards the end of his life, his behavior grew increasingly violent and self-destructive. He was jailed on several occasions in New York, Paris, and Mexico. Near the end, he did have what seems to be his only heterosexual relationship with Peggy Cowley, the divorced wife of the critic and publisher, Malcolm Cowley. Crane committed suicide when he returned with Peggy Cowley from Mexico in 1932 by jumping off the deck of a ship. He was all of 32.
Published in 1999, Mariani's biography commenmorates the Centennial of Crane's birth. It gives a good detailed account Crane's life. The poetic focus of the book is The Bridge. (some critics see White Buildings as the stronger, more representative part of Crane's work.) Mariani shows how Crane conceived the idea of his long poem and how he worked on it fitfully over many years. He also shows the difficulty Crane had in completing the work at all -- given his alcoholism. sexual promiscuity, difficulty in supporting himself, and bad relationship with his separated parents. But complete the work Crane did. It presents a mythic, multi-formed vision of the United States stretching from the Indians to our day of technology. There is much to be gained from this poem. I have loved it for many years and Mariani's discussion of the poem and its lenghty creation is illuminating.
Crane was a romantic in his life and art. Frequently, Mariani refers to him as the "last romantic", but this is an overstatement. I was reminded both by Crane's dissolute life and by his work of the beats -- particularly of Kerouac -- and the vision of America that they tried to articulate. With a Whitman-type vision of a mystical America encompassing all, the beats share and expand upon the romanticism of Hart Crane.
Mariani's book covers well Crane's tortured relationship with his parents. It includes great discussions of literary New York City and of Crane's friends. It shows well how Crane was captivated by New York. We see Crane going back and forth between Clevland, New York, Paris, Mexico and Hollywood in a short overreaching life. But most importantly, we see the creation and legacy of a poet. Mariani does well in describing the poems and in reading these difficult texts in conjunction with the poet's life and thought.
Crane's literary output was not extensive. Several of his poems are part of the treasures of American literature. These poems include, for me, "Voyages" (a six-part love poem from the White Buildings collection), "At Melville's Tomb" and other lyrics from White Buildings, The Broken Tower, Crane's final poem, and, of course The Bridge.
Mariani gives a good account of Crane. As with any biography of this type it is not definitive. I hope it will encourage the reader to explore and reflect upon Crane's poetry and achievement.