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Download F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby (The Cambridge Edition of the Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald) ePub

by Matthew J. Bruccoli,F. Scott Fitzgerald

Download F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby (The Cambridge Edition of the Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald) ePub
  • ISBN 0521402301
  • ISBN13 978-0521402309
  • Language English
  • Author Matthew J. Bruccoli,F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Publisher Cambridge University Press; Revised ed. edition (August 30, 1991)
  • Pages 280
  • Formats rtf doc txt lrf
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory History and Criticism
  • Size ePub 1999 kb
  • Size Fb2 1371 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 734

Since its publication in 1925, The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald's account of the American dream gone awry, has established itself as one of the most popular and widely read novels in the English language. Until now, however, no edition has printed the novel exactly as Fitzgerald intended. The first edition was marred by errors resulting from Fitzgerald's extensive rewriting in proof and the conditions under which the book was produced; moreover, the subsequent transmission of the text introduced proliferating departures from the author's words. This critical edition draws on the manuscript and surviving proofs of the novel, together with Fitzgerald's subsequent revisions to key passages, to provide the first authoritative text of The Great Gatsby. This volume also includes a detailed account of the genesis, composition, and publication of the novel; a full textual apparatus; crucial early draft material; helpful glosses on the peculiar geography and chronology of the book; and explanatory notes on topical allusions and historical references that contemporary readers might otherwise miss. Fitzgerald's masterpiece is thus brought closer to a cross-section of readers, more accessibly and more authentically than ever before. Matthew J. Bruccoli has published widely. He is the author of Some Sort of Epic Grandeur: The Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald (1980) and editor of New Essays on The Great Gatsby (CUP, 1985).

Scott Fitzgerald book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Scott Fitzgerald book.

It is a well-known story that F. Scott Fitzgerald, before settling on The Great Gatsby at Maxwell Perkins urging shortly before the book went to press, toyed around with dozens of names

Trimalchio has shown me a new way to love Gatsby. I'm compelled into a vast aesthetic contemplation: I dream of The Great Gatsby as it might have been, greater still-" Adam Begley, New York Observer the principle reason to read Trimalchio is to observe a masterpiece taking form through the process of revision. It is a well-known story that F. Scott Fitzgerald, before settling on The Great Gatsby at Maxwell Perkins urging shortly before the book went to press, toyed around with dozens of names. Among those was Trimalchio in the West Egg and Under the Red, White, and Blue.

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American fiction writer, whose works helped to illustrate the flamboyance and excess of the Jazz Age. While he achieved popular success, fame, and fortune in his lifetime, . . While he achieved popular success, fame, and fortune in his lifetime, he did not receive much critical acclaim until after his death. Perhaps the most notable member of the "Lost Generation" of the 1920s, Fitzgerald is now widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century.

Professor Bruccoli is the great Fitzgerald scholar, and anyone interested in the textual details of this novel should consult .

Professor Bruccoli is the great Fitzgerald scholar, and anyone interested in the textual details of this novel should consult his work. Title (p. 1 ): Right up to the last moment Fitzgerald preferred Under the Red, White, and Blue as the title and, indeed, blamed the novel's initial lack of success on the title it finally carried - one of his few errors of judgement during the inspired revisionary period. Epigraph by Thomas Park D'Invilliers (p. 5): Written by Fitzgerald. Fitzgerald's revision of Nick's and Gatsby's units makes it possible for them to have seen each other at Chateau-Thierry, but at the same time makes it extremely unlikely for Gatsby to have been in the Argonne Forest.

Scott Fitzgerald, James L. W. III West, Don C. Skemer.

This page contains details about the Fiction book The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald published in 1925. The novel chronicles an era that Fitzgerald himself dubbed the "Jazz Age". This book is the 4th greatest Fiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks. Following the shock and chaos of World War I, American society enjoyed unprecedented levels of prosperity during the "roaring" 1920s as the economy soared. At the same time, Prohibition, the ban on the sale and manufacture of alcohol as mandated by the Eighteenth Amendment, made millionaires out of bootleggers and led to an increase in organized crime, for example the Jewish mafia.

Free eBooks at Planet eBook. By F. Scott Fitzgerald. Free eBooks at Planet eBook. Download free eBooks of classic literature, books and novels at Planet eBook. And, after boasting this way of my tolerance, I come to the admission that it has a limit. Conduct may be founded on the hard rock or the wet marshes but after a certain point I don’t care what it’s founded on.

Fitzgerald conveyed in The Great Gatsby the sense of hope America promised to its youth and the disappointment its youth felt when America failed to deliver

Scott Fitzgerald, American short-story writer and novelist famous for his depictions of the Jazz Age (the 1920s), his most brilliant novel being The Great Gatsby (1925). His private life, with his wife, Zelda, in both America and France, became almost as celebrated as his novels. Fitzgerald conveyed in The Great Gatsby the sense of hope America promised to its youth and the disappointment its youth felt when America failed to deliver. This-the promise and failure of the American Dream-is a common theme in Fitzgerald’s work. Other common themes in his work include society and class, wealth and materialism, and romantic idealism. Tales of the Jazz Age.

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Talk about F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby (The Cambridge Edition of the Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald)


Ieregr
This review is about this version of the book, not the story itself. This is a "bootleg" version of the book, not an authentic publication. The cover has a poor quality picture (as evidenced by the visible pixels) and the book itself is typed in a different font than the publisher intended. I purchased this book for my son's high school english class and we had to get a different copy as this version has NO publication information. NO copyright information. Students are required to cite that information and this book doesn't even have a page for this information. Had I known, I would have purchased a different version. Unfortunately, the class didn't start reading the book until after my return window had closed or it would have gone back for sure.
 The Great Gatsby
Villo
I don't know how I made it through high school without reading this classic, but I'm so glad I get to come back to books like this and read them as an adult. I'm sure I would have learned stuff in high school, but I feel like I'm getting more appreciation out of books like this as I get older.
The only thing I knew about this book before I started reading was that it was a shallow love story that ends with the girl dumping the poor, innocent guy....or something. And yes that is the plot, but I think the story can also be about the American dream and who it's really available to. What is the American dream? Is it just getting money and it doesn't matter how? Did we really get away from social inequality? I hadn't really thought about any of that before reading this book. It made me wonder what my American dream is. Do I just want to get lots of money, a big house, and tons of stuff? Or is there more to it than that? Without spoiling the end, I feel like Mr. Fitzgerald's opinion on the matter is that some people are born to live the American dream and some aren't - and there isn't much you can do to change it. The fate of Daisy and Gatsby really brings that tragic idea home.

The parties were unreal. I was drooling over the mention of all the food. I couldn't help but imagine the Dowager Countess from Downton Abbey coming to Gatsby's house and being appalled at what Americans called "a dinner party." My mind was buzzing with all the practical details and sheer amount of money that it would take to feed two dinners and tons of alcohol to that many people... But the parties and glamour are just covering up the fact that most of these people are shady, immoral, hypocritical and just plain unhappy. Especially Tom and his wife Daisy.

I loved the writing. It was simple, charming, and witty - an interesting contrast to the much deeper story going on. The last line about how we can't escape from the past points out that even though as Americans we say that anyone can achieve wealth, happiness and equality, the truth is we keep getting sucked into the rules of the past.

The only thing I thought was overdone was the symbolic Eye Doctor bilboard in the ash valley. Don't let the symbolic Eye Doctor Ad/God's Judgement fall on you on the way out.

Overall, a novel that got me really thinking about life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness in the context of a beautiful, tragic, and romantic story.
Enditaling
I believe the alchemy of time, place and the right talent and drive can create in an author the story and words to compose a portrait of truth and beauty that transcends time; a work of supreme art so rare and splendid that it is revered because our soul longs to be transported to the splendor of a moment in time and desires to be granted the providence to create something so divine that through it we may survive on this Earth forever.

As rare and astounding as the art of Rembrandt, Renoir and Rodin, F. Scott Fitzgerald's short novel casts a spell on me in his painting Love, Truth, Mythology and Tragedy in words so poignant, eloquent and gorgeous that I, a mere mortal, cannot do them justice, so I must quote (though I typically prefer not to):

“The loneliest moment in someone’s life is when they are watching their whole world fall apart, and all they can do is stare blankly.”

***

“In his blue gardens men and girls came and went like moths among the whisperings and the champagne and the stars.”

***

“His heart beat faster and faster as Daisy’s white face came up to his own. He knew that when he kissed this girl, and forever wed his unutterable visions to her perishable breath, his mind would never romp again like the mind of God. So he waited, listening for a moment longer to the tuning fork that had been struck upon a star. Then he kissed her. At his lips’ touch she blossomed like a flower and the incarnation was complete.”

***

“And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.

Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And one fine morning——

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
***

This is my favorite American novel.