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Download Reading Adoption: Family and Difference in Fiction and Drama ePub

by Marianne Novy

Download Reading Adoption: Family and Difference in Fiction and Drama ePub
  • ISBN 047203264X
  • ISBN13 978-0472032648
  • Language English
  • Author Marianne Novy
  • Publisher University of Michigan Press (August 7, 2007)
  • Pages 304
  • Formats txt azw mbr lrf
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory History and Criticism
  • Size ePub 1753 kb
  • Size Fb2 1713 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 807

Reading Adoption explores the ways in which novels and plays portray adoption, probing the cultural fictions that these literary representations have perpetuated. Through careful readings of works by Sophocles, Shakespeare, George Eliot, Charles Dickens, Barbara Kingsolver, Edward Albee and others, Marianne Novy reveals how fiction has contributed to general perceptions of adoptive parents, adoptees, and birth parents. She observes how these works address the question of what makes a parent, as she scrutinizes basic themes that repeat throughout, such as the difference between adoptive parents and children, the mirroring between adoptees and their birth parents, and the romanticization of the theme of lost family and recovered identity. Engagingly written from Novy's dual perspectives as critic and adult adoptee, the book artfully combines the techniques of literary and feminist scholarship with memoir, and in doing so it sheds new light on familiar texts.Marianne Novy is Professor of English and Women's Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. She is author or editor of numerous books, including Imagining Adoption: Essays on Literature and Culture.

Marianne Novy's "Reading Adoption" is a breath of fresh air in the dismal swamp of sentimentalism and sloppy .

Marianne Novy's "Reading Adoption" is a breath of fresh air in the dismal swamp of sentimentalism and sloppy journalism that characterizes too much of adoption literature, both pro-adoption and pro-adoption reform. Unlike many adopted persons who have written their stories, when Ms. Novy found her birthmother and family, she did not find soul mates or people with whom she had a great deal in common, even though she was welcomed and values the ongoing relationship she has with them. She wrote, " There are two simple views that public discourse about adoption falls into too easily.

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Reading Adoption book.

Reading Adoption by Marianne Novy is an unusual and notable study of works that might not be traditionally considered "orphan fiction" but which have always been attractive to children and young teens because of the variations on the "family romance" they contain

Reading Adoption by Marianne Novy is an unusual and notable study of works that might not be traditionally considered "orphan fiction" but which have always been attractive to children and young teens because of the variations on the "family romance" they contain

Author: Marianne Novy. Crime and Punishment.

Author: Marianne Novy. Contemporary American Drama (Edinburgh Critical Guides to Literature). Friedrich Schiller Drama, Thought and Politics (Cambridge Studies in German). Hegemony and Fantasy in Irish Drama, 1899-1949. Ibsen's Drama author to audience.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Reading Adoption: Family and Difference in Fiction and Drama. Category: Домоводство, досуг.

Family and Difference in Fiction and Drama. Published September 28, 2007 by University of Michigan Press.

Marianne Novy, Reading Adoption: Family and Difference in Fiction and Drama (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005). Susan Wadia-Ells, e. The Adoption Reader: Birth Mothers, Adoptive Mothers and Adopted Daughters Tell Their Stories (Seattle: Seal Press, 1995). Anjani Chandra et a. Adoption, Adoption Seeking, and Relinquishment for Adoption in the United States, Advance Data from Vital and Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Center for Health Statistics, no. 306 (May 11, 1999).

Novy, Marianne, 1945–. Reading adoption : family and difference in fiction and drama /. Marianne Novy. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. In chapter 5 of this book I expand on my essay Adoption in Silas Marner and Daniel Deronda, previously published by the University of Michigan Press in my anthology Imagining Adoption: Essays on Litera-. viii Acknowledgments. ture and Culture, and I use a few sentences from my introduction to that book in the ‹rst chapter of this one.

Talk about Reading Adoption: Family and Difference in Fiction and Drama


Malarad
This is a fantastic resource for adoptees. Even though the author comes from an entirely different generation of adopted people, her experiences related closely to my own. This is also a great text for parents of adoptees because it provides a lens through which to understand adoption as it is presented in literature and film.
Kikora
Marianne Novy's "Reading Adoption" is a breath of fresh air in the dismal swamp of sentimentalism and sloppy journalism that characterizes too much of adoption literature, both pro-adoption and pro-adoption reform. Ms. Novy, a professor of English Literature and an adopted person, intersperses her own story with examples of adoption and illegitimacy in literature, from such diverse sources as Shakespeare, Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, Barbara Kingsolver, and Edward Albee. Her examples range from Tom Jones to The Diary of Brigid Jones, from Oedipus to Carol Schafer's Sacred Virgin. She discusses both familiar favorites, and those new to some of us that makes us want to look into them, or to look at old favorites with a fresh viewpoint.

Unlike many adopted persons who have written their stories, when Ms. Novy found her birthmother and family, she did not find soul mates or people with whom she had a great deal in common, even though she was welcomed and values the ongoing relationship she has with them. She wrote, " There are two simple views that public discourse about adoption falls into too easily. One is the view that only adoptive relationships matter; the other view is that only birth relationships matter. Some people have articulated a third viewpoint, that both matter but probably in different ways, that it depends on the circumstances, that adoptees have a choice about how to negotiate their identity and their relationships. But this approach still is not as widespread as it should be. I hope that this book, by analyzing places in literature where simplifications are found and places where they are transcended, will show more people how their world looks with a third view."

Marianne Novy admirably succeeds in doing this, and illuminates the tension between families, birth and adoptive, that is always there, and is always much more complex than the all-nature or all-nurture camps try to make it. She makes us all question our dearly held myths and icons. By not accepting without comment either the "forever family" fairytales beloved of many adoptive parents, or the reunion fairytales beloved of many birthmothers and adoption reformers, she makes all of us think, not just feel, and she stretches our imagination to encompass the complexity and diversity of adoptees and adoption as it is lived.

This is a groundbreaking book that should be read and discussed by all who are touched by adoption.

Mary Anne Cohen

Feb.2006
Kigabar
Who am I? Where do I come from? Where am I going? These labor intensive identity questions take a lifetime to answer. For adopted persons, sharing nature and nurture with two mothers and two fathers, responses are often more complicated. Fiction and drama involving adopted people have provided conscious and unconscious answers, advice and role models to deal with such complex family situations over the centuries.

In Reading Adoption: Family and Difference in Fiction and Drama, Marianne Novy, an adopted person who is a Professor of English and Women's Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, gives astute commentary about adoption literature from Oedipus to the novels of Barbara Kingsolver. As a sensitive memorist, Dr. Novy also reveals how adoption literature has enhanced and sometimes hindered her own search for self-definition. This author's goal is to "more of the next generation of adopttes to feel less alone" and to make adopted parents aware (through literature) of the stuggles necessary to meeting their children's needs.

If you love reading, if you are connected to the world of adoption, if you crave making connections between literature and drama and people's interior lives, this is the book you are looking for. As an English teacher and parent by adoption, I found it spoke directly to both my professional expertise and to my personal experiences. I applaud Marianne Novy for her fair, generous and interesting book, the work of a gifted scholar and mature daughter.