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Download The Rushdie Affair: The Novel, the Ayatollah, and the West ePub

by Koenraad Elst,Daniel Pipes

Download The Rushdie Affair: The Novel, the Ayatollah, and the West ePub
  • ISBN 0765809966
  • ISBN13 978-0765809964
  • Language English
  • Author Koenraad Elst,Daniel Pipes
  • Publisher Transaction Publishers; 2 edition (April 8, 2003)
  • Pages 303
  • Formats doc rtf docx lit
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory History and Criticism
  • Size ePub 1304 kb
  • Size Fb2 1679 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 117

The publication in 1988 of Salman Rushdie's novel The Satanic Verses triggered a furor that pitted much of the Islamic world against the West over issues of blasphemy and freedom of expression. The controversy soon took on the aspect of a confrontation of civilizations, provoking powerful emotions on a global level. It involved censorship, protests, riots, a break in diplomatic relations, culminating in the notorious Iranian edict calling for the death of the novelist. In The Rushdie Affair, Daniel Pipes explains why the publication of The Satanic Verses became a cataclysmic event with far-reaching political and social consequences.

Pipes looks at the Rushdie affair in both its political and cultural aspects and shows in considerable detail what the fundamentalists perceived as so offensive in The Satanic Verses as against what Rushdie's novel actually said. Pipes explains how the book created a new crisis between Iran and the West at the time--disrupting international diplomacy, billions of dollars in trade, and prospects for the release of Western hostages in Lebanon.

Pipes maps out the long-term implications of the crisis. If the Ayatollah so easily intimidated the West, can others do the same? Can millions of fundamentalist Muslims now living in the United States and Europe possibly be assimilated into a culture so alien to them? Insightful and brilliantly written, this volume provides a full understanding of one of the most significant events in recent years. Koenraad Elst's postscript reviews the enduring impact of the Rushdie affair.


The Rushdie Affair: The Novel, the Ayatollah, and the West is a book written by historian Daniel Pipes, published in 1990. It focuses on events surrounding The Satanic Verses. The afterword was written by Koenraad Elst

The Rushdie Affair: The Novel, the Ayatollah, and the West is a book written by historian Daniel Pipes, published in 1990. The afterword was written by Koenraad Elst. The first part of the book describes The Satanic Verses and Ayatollah Khomeini's edict, explaining why Rushdie's book became a controversy. The second part describes responses to the text and criticizes censorship of the book in some countries.

THE RUSHDIE AFFAIR is Daniel Pipes' analysis of the uproar by Muslims over Salman Rushdie's novel THE SATANIC VERSES from mid-1988 to March 1989, with especial attention on Ayatollah Khomeini's death fatwa and the resulting diplomatic fallout

THE RUSHDIE AFFAIR is Daniel Pipes' analysis of the uproar by Muslims over Salman Rushdie's novel THE SATANIC VERSES from mid-1988 to March 1989, with especial attention on Ayatollah Khomeini's death fatwa and the resulting diplomatic fallout. Though the book was published in early 1990 and so lacks a long-term view of the matter, it is still a valuable and informative historical document.

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In The Rushdie Affair, Daniel Pipes explains why the publication of The .

In The Rushdie Affair, Daniel Pipes explains why the publication of The Satanic Verses became a cataclysmic event with far-reaching political and social consequences. Pipes looks at the Rushdie affair in both its political and cultural aspects and shows in considerable detail what the fundamentalists perceived as so offensive in The Satanic Verses as against what Rushdie's novel actually said.

The afterword was written by Koenraad Elst According to Emilie.

The afterword was written by Koenraad Elst. The first part of the book describes the The Satanic Verses and Ayatollah Khomeini's edict, explaining why Rushdie's book became a controversy. 1 Reception According to Emilie Réné, in Les Cahiers du CERI (CERI is a French public institution in political science), Pipes' essay "suffers from oversimplification". New York: Birch Lane, 1990.

A Birch Lane Press book. Includes bibliographical references and index.

The Rushdie Affair book. He is the president of the Middle East Forum, and publisher of its Middle East Quarterly journal. His writing focuses on the American foreign policy and the Middle East.

The Rushdie Affair: The Novel, the Ayatollah, and the West is a book written by historian Daniel Pipes, published in 1990.

Pipes details what the fundamentalists perceived, and what the novel actually said, that proved so offensive to some Muslims. Pipes explain how Rushdie’s book created a new crisis between Iran and the West disrupting international diplomacy, billions of dollars in trade, and the prospects of Western hostage in Lebanon. He also spells out the chilling, long-term implications of the crisis. If the Ayatollah so easily intimidated the West, can others now do the same?

In The Rushdie Affair, Daniel Pipes explains why the publication of The .

Talk about The Rushdie Affair: The Novel, the Ayatollah, and the West


Thorgaginn
Good one in true sense of the word.
Folsa
THE RUSHDIE AFFAIR is Daniel Pipes' analysis of the uproar by Muslims over Salman Rushdie's novel THE SATANIC VERSES from mid-1988 to March 1989, with especial attention on Ayatollah Khomeini's death fatwa and the resulting diplomatic fallout. Though the book was published in early 1990 and so lacks a long-term view of the matter, it is still a valuable and informative historical document.

Pipes explains how the novel is offensive to Muslims, explicating its references to the founding of Islam which the average Western reader wouldn't grasp, as well as Khomeini's edict and voices of support and dissent with it. The second part of the book is an examination of larger issues evoked by the novel's reception, namely the relationship between Iran and the West, the efficacy or lack thereof of censorship and, quite pertinent to our times sixteen years later, the matter of Muslim communities living in the West. Pipes asks if perhaps the greatest danger against speech isn't far-off pariah states like Iran, but rather Muslim communities in Europe which refuse to integrate and wish to eradicate all opposition to Islam and its sharia law in the society around them.

It is clear right away that Pipes has little sympathy for Rushdie. In the short biography of the author, Rushdie is described as a haughty intellectual, an elitist, an a nihilistic Leftist. I thought this was unfair, and showed the author to have little understanding or appreciation of the literary art. However, Pipes' low view of Rushdie allows him to consider in greater depth the question of whether Rushdie deserved the criticism and fatwa. Ultimately, what Pipes feels about the matter is simple bafflement, because the Muslim world during the 20th century tolerated writers and intellectuals who said far worse things about Islam than Rushdie, and there's no real reason why Rushdie should have been singled out for such a great outcry.

The book is informative, but more on its coverage of international relations than any insights on the literary world. If you haven't read THE SATANIC VERSES yet, don't try Pipes' book, because you've been missing out on an entertaining and truly marvelous novel, and it will be baffling to read about a controversy over a book you know nothing about yet. The book may be worth flipping through if you're curious about why Rushdie's novel sparked such a reaction.
Zuser
Daniel Pipes has a definite, often negative view of radical Islam but in "The Rushdie Affair: The Novel, the Ayatollah, and the West," he sticks to research and avoids polemics.

For those who have forgotten, Salman Rushdie wrote a novel called the Satanic Verses which infuriated many Muslims around the world, and led then Iranian leader, the Ayatollah Khomeini, to issue a death sentence.

"Satanic Verses" is a Western term to refer to a very real problem within Islam that attributes words to Mohammed that are deemed incorrect but then blamed on Satan having pretended to be God and whispered them in Mohammed's ear. The words are later withdrawn. Rushdie's decision to title a novel Satanic Verses was seen as blasphemy against the entire religion, and to this day, Rushdie continues to live with the threat of death.

What Pipes does is clearly explain the issues, the history of the Koranic verses, and how Khomeini's actions were perceived and acted upon. Like a lot of books about the Middle East, this is one that should be read against others, because in that region, there's no end to new ways to interpret the same set of facts. Pipes' version is just one.
monotronik
THE RUSHDIE AFFAIR is Daniel Pipes' analysis of the uproar by Muslims over Salman Rushdie's novel THE SATANIC VERSES from mid-1988 to March 1989, with especial attention on Ayatollah Khomeini's death fatwa and the resulting diplomatic fallout. Though the book was published in early 1990 and so lacks a long-term view of the matter, it is still a valuable and informative historical document.

Pipes explains how the novel is offensive to Muslims, explicating its references to the founding of Islam which the average Western reader wouldn't grasp, as well as Khomeini's edict and voices of support and dissent with it. The second part of the book is an examination of larger issues evoked by the novel's reception, namely the relationship between Iran and the West, the efficacy or lack thereof of censorship and, quite pertinent to our times sixteen years later, the matter of Muslim communities living in the West. Pipes asks if perhaps the greatest danger against speech isn't far-off pariah states like Iran, but rather Muslim communities in Europe which refuse to integrate and wish to eradicate all opposition to Islam and its sharia law in the society around them.

It is clear right away that Pipes has little sympathy for Rushdie. In the short biography of the author, Rushdie is described as a haughty intellectual, an elitist, an a nihilistic Leftist. I thought this was unfair, and showed the author to have little understanding or appreciation of the literary art. However, Pipes' low view of Rushdie allows him to consider in greater depth the question of whether Rushdie deserved the criticism and fatwa. Ultimately, what Pipes feels about the matter is simple bafflement, because the Muslim world during the 20th century tolerated writers and intellectuals who said far worse things about Islam than Rushdie, and there's no real reason why Rushdie should have been singled out for such a great outcry.

The book is informative, but more on its coverage of international relations than any insights on the literary world. If you haven't read THE SATANIC VERSES yet, don't try Pipes' book, because you've been missing out on an entertaining and truly marvelous novel, and it will be baffling to read about a controversy over a book you know nothing about yet. The book may be worth flipping through if you're curious about why Rushdie's novel sparked such a reaction.