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Download Blooms of Darkness: A Novel ePub

by Jeffrey M. Green,Aharon Appelfeld

Download Blooms of Darkness: A Novel ePub
  • ISBN 0805242805
  • ISBN13 978-0805242805
  • Language English
  • Author Jeffrey M. Green,Aharon Appelfeld
  • Publisher Schocken (March 9, 2010)
  • Pages 288
  • Formats mbr lrf lrf lit
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Literary
  • Size ePub 1483 kb
  • Size Fb2 1550 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 709

**WINNER OF THE 2012 INDEPENDENT FOREIGN FICTION PRIZE**A new novel from the award-winning, internationally acclaimed Israeli writer (“One of the greatest writers of the age”—The Guardian), a haunting, heartbreaking story of love and loss. The ghetto in which the Jews have been confined is being liquidated by the Nazis, and eleven-year-old Hugo is brought by his mother to the local brothel, where one of the prostitutes has agreed to hide him. Mariana is a bitterly unhappy woman who hates what she has done to her life, and night after night Hugo sits in her closet and listens uncomprehendingly as she rages at the Nazi soldiers who come and go. When she’s not mired in self-loathing, Mariana is fiercely protective of the bewildered, painfully polite young boy. And Hugo becomes protective of Mariana, too, trying to make her laugh when she is depressed, soothing her physical and mental agony with cold compresses. As the memories of his family and friends grow dim, Hugo falls in love with Mariana. And as her life spirals downward, Mariana reaches out for consolation to the adoring boy who is on the cusp of manhood. The arrival of the Russian army sends the prostitutes fleeing. But Mariana is too well known, and she is arrested as a Nazi collaborator for having slept with the Germans. As the novel moves toward its heartrending conclusion, Aharon Appelfeld once again crafts out of the depths of unfathomable tragedy a renewal of life and a deeper understanding of what it means to be human.

I love Aharon Appelfeld’s Blooms of Darkness.

I love Aharon Appelfeld’s Blooms of Darkness. How can this great novelist still find fresh ways of telling the terrible story of those years? There’s nothing reflexive or familiar in here, each sentence is exquisitely judged; we read with the same astonishment and trepidation as if it was all happening now, and for the first time. Aharon Appelfeld - a 78-year-old Israeli writer - and his excellent translator Jeffrey M. Green - write the entire book in the present; the implication is that the present is the only time that exists, since the past and the future have been obliterated. The tone is understated and controlled, taut and haunting.

In Blooms of Darkness, the person who blooms is Mariana, who works in. .

In Blooms of Darkness, the person who blooms is Mariana, who works in a brothel that services German occupiers. She is entrusted with the care of Hugo - a pre-teen - by his mother, an old school friend, when the Jews are forced to go into hiding.

Blooms of Darkness (Hebrew: פרחי האפלה‎, Pirhei HaAfela) is a 2006 novel by the Israeli writer Aharon Appelfeld

Blooms of Darkness (Hebrew: פרחי האפלה‎, Pirhei HaAfela) is a 2006 novel by the Israeli writer Aharon Appelfeld. The narrative follows an 11-year-old Jewish boy who stays with a prostitute in a Ukrainian ghetto during World War II. Appelfeld said that with the book, he "wanted to explore the darkest places of human behavior and to show that even there, generosity and love can survive; that humanity and love can overcome cruelty and brutality"

Appelfeld purchased his first Hebrew book at the age of 25: King of Flesh and . A Cafe Should Give Inspiration" Aharon Appelfeld on Ticho House, Jerusalem Haaretz. Alain Elkann (Fall 2014).

Appelfeld purchased his first Hebrew book at the age of 25: King of Flesh and Blood by Moshe Shamir  . 2012 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize for Blooms of Darkness: at the time, Appelfeld was the oldest ever recipient of the prize. 2015 National Jewish Book Award in Children's Literature Finalist for Adam & Thomas. 2016 Sydney Taylor Book Award for Adam & Thomas.

ALSO BY AHARON APPELFELD Badenheim 1939 The Age of Wonders Tzili The Retreat . Also by aharon appelfeld. Hugo closed his eyes and immediately saw the high, green Carpathian Mountains.

ALSO BY AHARON APPELFELD Badenheim 1939 The Age of Wonders Tzili The Retreat To the Land of the Cattails The Immortal Bartfuss For Every Sin The Healer Katerina. Abraham was very tall, and he and his little son Isaac walked slowly, the ram trailing behind them, its head down, as if it knew its fate.

In Blooms of Darkness: A Novel, Appelfeld tells the story of Hugo, eleven years old, a Jew, the son of upper .

In Blooms of Darkness: A Novel, Appelfeld tells the story of Hugo, eleven years old, a Jew, the son of upper middle class parents. Appelfeld uses an omniscient narrator writing in the present tense. The imminence of death hangs over every turn of the page. Aharon Appelfeld – a 78-year-old Israeli writer – and his excellent translator Jeffrey M. Green – write the entire book in the present; the implication is that the present is the only time that exists, since the past and the future have been obliterated.

AHARON APPELFELD is the author of more than forty works of fiction and nonfiction, including The Iron Tracks, Until the Dawn's Light (both winners of the National Jewish Book Award), The Story of a Life (winner of the Prix Médicis Étranger), and Badenheim 1939. Other honors he has received include the Giovanni Boccaccio Literary Prize, the Nelly Sachs Prize, the Israel Prize, the Bialik Prize, and the MLA Commonwealth Award.

By Aharon Appelfeld Translated by Jeffrey M. Green. I love Aharon Appelfeld’s Blooms of Darkness. How can this great novelist still find fresh ways of telling the terrible story of those years?

By Aharon Appelfeld Translated by Jeffrey M. By Aharon Appelfeld Translated by Jeffrey M. Category: Literary Fiction.

Aharon Appelfeld, Jeffrey M. He checks the opening near the toilet that Mariana spoke of, and it’s a good thing he does, because it’s full of boards and rags. The thought that in an emergency he can escape makes Hugo glad, and he sits and writes in his notebook:Mama dear,Mariana was fired, and she is about to pass me on to her friend Nasha. The contact between people here isn’t soft. Everyone demands the impossible from others.

Aharon Appelfeld survived the Holocaust as a child, living like a wild boy in the forests of Ukraine. Neither survives physically; but that is not what this book means by survival. You can't get much further from The Night Porter than that

Aharon Appelfeld survived the Holocaust as a child, living like a wild boy in the forests of Ukraine. His remarkable memoir, The Story of a Life, tells how he briefly found shelter with a woman called Maria, the village prostitute. Maria drank, and was often despairing, but when she was happy she filled the hut with light. You can't get much further from The Night Porter than that. Carole Angier's 'Primo Levi: The Double Bond' is published by Penguin.

Talk about Blooms of Darkness: A Novel


FLIDER
It is not unusual to compare a Holocaust-themed book with other excellent fictional works from that time period. So it was interesting that the one book that sprung to mind after closing the pages of completing Blooms of Darkness was Cervantes' Don Quixote.

The parallels between the two abound. Don Quixote--in the traditions of knights-errant of old - finds a love whom he names Dulcinea...or "sweetness." She is not rich or famous or beautiful or well-born, but to him, she is his queen and his lady. She begins as someone with little self-worth but by the end, she blooms under Don Quixote's love.

In Blooms of Darkness, the person who blooms is Mariana, who works in a brothel that services German occupiers. She is entrusted with the care of Hugo - a pre-teen - by his mother, an old school friend, when the Jews are forced to go into hiding.

Although the story is Hugo's, the spotlight often shines on Mariana, a contradiction of piousness and looseness, self-centerness and unselfishness. Hidden in Mariana's closet - literally and figuratively - Hugo craves her attention and views her as his personal Dulcinea. The majority of the novel is set within her bedroom...and in his imagination.

Aharon Appelfeld - a 78-year-old Israeli writer - and his excellent translator Jeffrey M. Green - write the entire book in the present; the implication is that the present is the only time that exists, since the past and the future have been obliterated. The tone is understated and controlled, taut and haunting.

Gradually, he creates a grafting of his two key characters - Hugo and Mariana. As a mocking townswoman says: "Whores and Jews are always persecuted. There's nothing to be done." Indeed, as life spirals downward for both Hugo and Mariana - as the world looks on without pity and defines each of them as less than human - the two look to each other for sustenance and love.

At times, as a reader, I hoped for a little less reticence; still, there was no time where I didn't admire and respect what Mr. Appelfeld was so intelligently creating. The universal themes of loss and loneliness are explored here, along with the optimism of the differences that one person can make in the life of another. While the story is grim and disturbing, it is, in curious ways, also uplifting. (4.5)
WUNDERKIND
Is this a Holocaust book, or something else? If the former, it has one striking narrative idea going for it: a young Ukrainian Jewish boy entrusted by his mother to the care of a childhood friend, who works in a brothel serving German soldiers. The pink-shrouded bedroom and the closet perfumed with the whore's clothes create an unreal world for Hugo, the eleven-year-old boy. But they also create an unreal world for the reader, repetitive, almost simplistic, in which such events as Hugo overhears combine with his dreams and letters that he writes but will never send. It is uncomplicated, easy reading, but with the exception of the unusual setting, the ground has been covered before. This novel might work for the high-school market, but seems to have little justification in the adult one.

Yet there is one aspect that would make me hesitate about giving the book to a teenage reader. Hugo is growing up, and over the course of the book he attains puberty. Gradually, the relationship between him and his protector, Marianna (a fascinating character in her own right) changes, in ways that made this decidedly adult reader rather uncomfortable. Unusually for a Holocaust story, the Germans are driven out with ninety pages still to go. The last third of the book quite loses whatever small narrative tension the earlier parts may have had, but I begin to wonder whether this is not the point? Whether it is not precisely this state of displacement, of searching for something that will never be found, that has impelled Appelfeld all along?

In particular, I read that Appelfeld's mother was murdered when he was eight and that "the search for a mother figure is central to his work" (Wikipedia). You can certainly see that here. Hugo's mother, a pharmacist who would go out of her way to help the poor, is presented as a saintly figure, with whom he still communicates in his dreams and unsent letters. But gradually she is replaced by Marianna, a quasi-maternal relationship that is disturbing only in that it is NOT maternal. Throughout the book, various other women make contact with Hugo also, but none of them can take his mother's place. I find this actually very moving -- but only AFTER reading something about Appelfeld's real life. When I see that Philip Roth described Appelfeld as "a displaced writer of displaced fiction, who has made of displacement and disorientation a subject uniquely his own," I can see what he means and respect the writer for his life's work. But what I read afterwards does not alter the fact that I found this actual book simplistic, slow-moving, and repetitious.
sergant
Possible spoilers ahead: I was thrilled to see this book was available on Kindle: I pre-ordered it without hesitation, based on the strength of the author's previous work. I am so glad to see the best of current world literature available on Kindle, and not just bestsellers and pop fiction. I was not disappointed in the least; it was another great novel by Appelfeld. I was totally engaged in Hugo's story from page one. Other's have described the plot very well; I am left with sharing my impressions - the horror of having to leave one's child behind with an old friend who lives as a prostitute in order to save his life, the agony of living one's innocent years of childhood within the confines of a room, and the even more dreadful confinement of a closet, and the destructive self-loathing and simple bravery of Hugo's benefactor. All of these things add up to a thoughtful and evocative novel.
porosh
A novel of World War II and the hiding of Jews. I have read many such novels, about the plight of the Jewish people in Europe and I have to say this was very, very different from any I have read. I recommend it. This author just had another come out in translation and decided to pick this work up too and am glad I did.
Landaron
beautiful book, movingand peotic It must be read till the end in order to get the full impact.
Painshade
Excellent translation!
Kiutondyl
I have read all the books written by Aaharon Applefeld beginning with Badheim which was my favorite and with which I could relate in the deepest way. They all had a fascination of one sort or another and "The Iron Rail" pulled them all together--it was the bow to the gift wrapping. Unfortunatly,this one was a collection of all little bits and pieces that were most disturbing and unpleasant. My favorite will always be "Badenheim".

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