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Download Along This Way ePub

by James Weldon Johnson

Download Along This Way ePub
  • ISBN 0670002232
  • ISBN13 978-0670002238
  • Language English
  • Author James Weldon Johnson
  • Publisher Penguin Books (January 26, 1968)
  • Formats lit azw mobi txt
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Literary
  • Size ePub 1712 kb
  • Size Fb2 1711 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 917

Book by Johnson, James Weldon

James Weldon Johnson’s career was one of extraordinary range, spanning the worlds of diplomacy (as .

James Weldon Johnson’s career was one of extraordinary range, spanning the worlds of diplomacy (as . At the dawning of what would become the modern civil rights movement, he forged a record of accomplishment that defied the odds

James Weldon Johnson (June 17, 1871 – June 26, 1938) was an American author and civil rights activist. He was married to civil rights activist Grace Nail Johnson. Johnson was a leader of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

James Weldon Johnson (June 17, 1871 – June 26, 1938) was an American author and civil rights activist. Johnson was a leader of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), where he started working in 1917. He served in that position from 1920 to 1930

Johnson, James Weldon, 1871-1938, Authors, American - 20th century - Biography, Civil rights workers - United States - Biography, African American authors - Biography, African Americans - Civil rights, United States - Race relations. New York, The Viking press.

Johnson, James Weldon, 1871-1938, Authors, American - 20th century - Biography, Civil rights workers - United States - Biography, African American authors - Biography, African Americans - Civil rights, United States - Race relations. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). I would turn last in this volume to Johnson's autobiography, "Along this Wa. This is a detailed work in which Johnson describes for the reader his childhood, his education, and his many and varied careers and writings. It is a great autobiography in its own right, and the reader will best appreciate it with an initial familiarity with Johnson's other writings.

To America by James Weldon Johnson. How would you have us as we areOr sinking neath the load we bearOur eyes fixed forward on a star. How would you have us, as we are?

To America by James Weldon Johnson. How would you have us, as we are? Or sinking 'neath the load we bear? Our eyes fixed forward on a star? Or gazing empty at despair? Rising or falling?

James Weldon Johnson distinguished himself equally as a man of letters .

James Weldon Johnson distinguished himself equally as a man of letters and as a civil rights leader in the early decades of the twentieth century. Bone, Robert . The Negro Novel in America, Yale University Press, 1958. Fleming, Robert . James Weldon Johnson and Arna Wendell Bontemps: A Reference Guide, . Johnson, James Weldon, Along This Way: The Autobiography of James Weldon Johnson, Viking, 1933, Da Capo, 1973. Levy, Eugene, James Weldon Johnson: Black Leader, Black Voice, University of Chicago Press, 1973.

Along This Way. The Autobiography of James Weldon Johnson

Along This Way. The Autobiography of James Weldon Johnson. By James Weldon Johnson Introduction by Sondra Kathryn Wilson. Published just four years before his death in 1938, James Weldon Johnson’s autobiography is a fascinating portrait of an African American who broke the racial divide at a time when the Harlem Renaissance had not yet begun to usher in the civil rights movement.

James Weldon Johnson died on June 26, 1938

James Weldon Johnson died on June 26, 1938. Selected Bibliography. Poetry Complete Poems (Penguin Books, 2000) The Selected Writings of James Weldon Johnson (Oxford University Press, 1995) Saint Peter Relates an Incident of the Resurrection Day (Viking Press, 1930) God's Trombones: Seven Negro Sermons in Verse (Viking Press, 1927) Fifty Years and Other Poems (The Cornhill Company, 1917). Prose Negro Americans, What Now? (Viking Press, 1934) Along This Way: The Autobiography of James Weldon Johnson (Viking Press, 1933) Black Manhattan (Alfred A. Knopf, 1930) The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (French & C. 1912).

Автор: Johnson, James Weldon Название: Along This Way Издательство: Random House (USA) . Поставляется из: США Описание: The autobiography of the celebrated African American writer and civil rights activist.

2008 Серия: Bio&Autobio/People Of Color Язык: ENG Размер: 1. 9 x 1. 3 x . 3 cm Рейтинг: Поставляется из: США Описание: The autobiography of the celebrated African American writer and civil rights activist.

Talk about Along This Way


Truthcliff
'The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man' is not a real memoir or non-fiction. It is a fictionalized autobiography written in 1912. Despite that it is fiction, it has a strong feel of true authenticity. What is truly wondrous and sad about the book is how the questions, disputes and agonies over race in 1912 have little changed since this novel was written.

The narrator's story is a coming-of-age one. He experiences unusual adventures because although his mother was a light-skinned black, he himself looks completely white. He describes his birth, education and travels throughout America and Europe. Sometimes he lives like a wealthy white man with wealthy white men, and sometimes he endures the poverty and discrimination of Southern American blacks. He also lived for a time amongst the criminal elements of New York City. His white skin allows him to move freely wherever he chooses, depending on what identity he wants to explore. He is fortunate to be a musical prodigy and he easily learns languages.

The crisis begins when he falls in love with a white woman...
Delalbine
James Weldon Johnson first published this book anonymously in 1912, to avoid any controversy that might endanger his diplomatic career. And it is actually not an autobiography, but rather historical fiction.

As he wrote this book anonymously, he created characters who were also anonymous. Of all the dozens of characters in the story there were only about four who had names, some of them nick-names. Even the young man who tells his story has no name.

Much of the story draws from Johnson's personal life as a Civil Rights activist. But unlike Johnson who Attended Atlanta University, the protagonist in the story spent many years in a variety of jobs where he learned various trades and several foreign languages.

Not until the "Ex-colored man" returns to the South knowing he could pass for white, did he begin to deal with the "race problem." But rather than involve himself in the issues of racism, Jim Crow, and the rights of black people, he spent much of his time learning the music and vernacular of the early 20th century.

It is an easy book to read, probably moreso due to the anonymous characterizations which would not point to the identity of the author.
Uylo
I chose 5 stars for a number of reasons. The first is the joy of reading a beautifully crafted and honest piece of writing. The poetic style elevated the narrative which is another reason for my rating. I appreciated the complex description of the perceptions of colored and whiteness versus the actual state of both groups of people. Third, the author introduced new and important nuances defying the stereotypical way of understanding history. He negated commonly held beliefs for both the white and the Negro and invited the reader into an honest and intimate exploration of personal and communal identity. Fourth, I believe this is a necessary resource for addressing the "negro question", a reference made by the author to what, why, and how to make progress in racial tolerance and human regard. Finally, I appreciate that this autobiography did not end as a spectacular tragedy or happy ending. There was no cleverly crafted moral statement. The account stands on it's own and from it I take many lessons to apply to my own consideration of white and colored, the cultural biases, and what role do I play in the continuing of history.
Kulafyn
To have the choice of choosing which "race" you'd rather be regardless of the neglected dna crying within to be recognized, to be respected comes easy for some while for others a difficult position to make that choice to fit in with what's convenient or to give honor to or the acknowledging of self hate. I wouldn't want to be in that position to save my life. I come from this history, I've heard the why it's important to pass or marry light damn-near-white and I've seen the arrogance and the fear of being found out that one is of the dna that would be frowned upon by the masses. He was born in the era where he literally saw the atrocities put upon the colored folks, the poverty and the classes, yet he made the decision to go the way he thought would bring some sense of satisfaction and to ease his conscience .... nevertheless beautifully written.
Gold Crown
I think I was supposed to read this in High School or College but did not. This is a must read and helps shed light on many of the problems that continue to pleague our society today.

Ignoring the social commentary, this is just a well written “page turner,” I did not want to stop listening!

If you are new to this book, do not read any reviews or analysis until after you read the book which is what I did so I had no preconcieved notions about the characters.