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Download Down to a Sunless Sea ePub

by David Graham

Download Down to a Sunless Sea ePub
  • ISBN 0330261843
  • ISBN13 978-0330261845
  • Language English
  • Author David Graham
  • Publisher Macmillan; New Ed edition (1981)
  • Pages 316
  • Formats doc lrf docx azw
  • Category Fiction
  • Size ePub 1195 kb
  • Size Fb2 1175 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 581


David Graham's Down to a Sunless Sea (1979) is a post-apocalyptic novel about a planeload of people during and after a short nuclear war, set in a near-future world where the USA is critically short of oil.

David Graham's Down to a Sunless Sea (1979) is a post-apocalyptic novel about a planeload of people during and after a short nuclear war, set in a near-future world where the USA is critically short of oil. The title of the book is taken from a line of the poem Kubla Khan by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Lin Carter wrote a fantasy novel with the same title (. ISBN 978-1-4344-9797-0), also derived from the same Coleridge poem.

Down to a Sunless Sea book. David Graham even manages to write captivating and convincing scenes that intrigues you to continue reading to find out what happens next (although the whole New York business in the beginning could've been cut down to just the essentials as it droned on and felt more like a post-apocalyspe Escape From New York-esque scenario than anything).

David Graham's "Down to a Sunless Sea" was one of the early-1980s post-apocalyptic novels

David Graham's "Down to a Sunless Sea" was one of the early-1980s post-apocalyptic novels. It should be a classic! It is an older version of the crisis of the oil shortage and Russian conflict, along with the A-Bomb Fear.

New York : Ballantine Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

I first read Down to a Sunless Sea about ten years ago. This is interesting because it is written in first person, as though related to someone at the South Pole.

Jet Blast - "Down To A Sunless Sea" - Anyone read it? . Down To A Sunless Sea". Written by a Brit, David Graham.

Jet Blast - "Down To A Sunless Sea" - Anyone read it? 1981 fiction about "Air Brit 797" JFK-LHR that diverts to Antarctica after. Anyone read it? 1981 fiction about "Air Brit 797" JFK-LHR that diverts to Antarctica after nuclear war erupts.

We will ship to every place with a US zip code, but nowhere else. It’s just too big a hassle to do the customs forms, play foreign PO games, etc. If item is not as described, purchase price, not including shipping, will be refunded upon return. We also will be happy to see any offers you may make.

item 1 Graham David-Down To A Sunless Sea (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -Graham David-Down To A Sunless Sea . A Game of Thrones: The Story Continues: The Complete Boxset of All 7 Books by George R. R. Martin (Multiple-item retail product, 2012).

item 3 Down to a Sunless Sea by Graham, David -Paperback -Down to a Sunless Sea by Graham, David -Paperback.

Find out more about Down to a Sunless Sea by David Graham at Simon & Schuster.

Talk about Down to a Sunless Sea


Cordaron
"Down to a Sunless Sea" was set in a bleak near-future (when it was released in 1981), after the United States had collapsed due to energy shortages. The book tells the story of an airline pilot who has to lead his passengers to safety after a nuclear war breaks out during their transatlantic flight.

David Graham's "Down to a Sunless Sea" was one of the early-1980s post-apocalyptic novels. I remember reading it then and, unlike so many other books I read then, this one really stayed with me. It really brought to life one of the trivial, often-unforgotten aspects of a nuclear war - what would the people in airliners, especially those over the oceans, do after they survived the initial holocaust?

The book does have some weaknesses: some cheesy, very "British" love scenes, and some of the backstory is unrealistic (especially the speed at which the world slips into crisis and the nuclear war breaks out). Also, the author probably overstates the initial devastation of a nuclear war and apparently didn't really research nuclear capabilities at the time.

Still, the main story is excellent - a fast-reading first person recount of success and triumph during a bleak time. It's a definite read for anyone interested in post-nuclear apocalyptic fiction.
Sagda
I must admit when I first began this book I was starting to lose hope. The first 75 pages REALLY drag and there seems to be no point or direction to the plot, characters, or background. I don't know why the author waited so long to get it going but once it does it is fantastic. I couldn't put this book down once the airplane becomes airborne, which is where the majority of the plot happens. I found the writing to be very descriptive without getting overly technical (except for a few rare instances). I thoughly enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone who enjoyed On The Beach, Alas Babylon, or Earth Abides.
Anaginn
No book has ever impacted me during my adolescent years more than this one did! I still remember having air raid drills and taking cover under my desk,,, I'd definitely recommend this book to everyone regardless of age I believe that you'll be just as I was so long ago!
Bulace
Down to a Sunless Sea is one of my favorite Sci-Fi stories. It should be a classic! It is an older version of the crisis of the oil shortage and Russian conflict, along with the A-Bomb Fear. An exciting and totally plausible, contemporary story of what could have happened then...and maybe still could now!!!
ACOS
A while back I was going through a serious dystopian kick. I just couldn't get enough of these type of stories. My friend Joe, another prolific reader, suggested some great older novels to read and David Graham was on the list.
The story itself is fantastic - days are dark, the US cannot find or buy enough oil with its devalued currency as China and Russia sense blood in the water. The great cities are vacant except for those who survive and thrive in the absence of law and order. On the other hand, the United Kingdom has managed to maintain their fuel supply and some semblance of normality. Eventually, the UK begins to accept refugees from America and they arrive at Heathrow in large jumbo jets under the Air Britain's Armada program.
Enter Jonah Scott, a British pilot taking off from JFK with a full flight of some 600 passengers and crew on board. He's a macho kind of guy, has all the right chest hair in the right places - and while he seems like a character straight out of Mad Men, he does do a rather nice job of fixing a Very Big Problem.
You see, after the wheels leave the tarmac and shortly before Jonah's second highball and 15th cigarette, tensions in the Middle East spill over into a free-for-all nuclear strike and suddenly, this plane full of people is stuck at cruising altitude. The US is gone, all the British airports have been destroyed and Jonah's desperate for a landing place. Now that's a Very Big Problem.
So where do you land a plane after the world has gone mad? If you cannot return to your origin and your destination is now radioactively hot - your options are severely limited to the amount of fuel remaining in the tank. And once you land, then what? With the prevailing winds, you might as well be in a Nevil Shute novel waiting on the beach for the nuclear cloud. With a seemingly un-ending supply of Scotch and cigarettes, Jonah and his ark reconfigure a new direction - for themselves as well as the future of all mankind
Despite the dated ideology and MANY logical fallacies, Down to a Sunless Sea remains an unsung classic. It is surprising to me that this book never made it to the silver screen. Even during all those airport disaster movies. And that also leads me to wonder - since movies are always being re-directed, re-produced with bigger, better scripts, more explosions, more computer graphics - why can't we also do that to some books?
Down to a Sunless Sea in its concept, is a rockin' book - but it desperately needs a lot of re-work. On the other hand, there's a certain charm with all the little hiccups in the story which kind of fits with all of Jonah's booze, babes and bombs.
Via
I read this book years ago and still find entertaining and relevant.
Elizabeth
Written for the near future; I read this book 2 years after the events in the book took place. Don't worry though.....this book is a still good and the dates can be changed to a few years ahead. Actually with the economy these days the book is more realistic than ever. I purchased my first copy in a basement used book store on High Street while attending Ohio State in 1987. I have bought several copies-loaning them out to friends and eventually losing track of them. I currently have a copy circulating amongst the US troops in Afghanistan and a copy in Iraq. 20+ years later, I just bought a copy I am not willing to lend out. All that have borrowed this book over the years have said they would like to read again. It just took reading the back cover and I was hooked. Enjoy!