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Download Deer Drink the Moon: Poems of Oregon ePub

by Liz Nakazawa

Download Deer Drink the Moon: Poems of Oregon ePub
  • ISBN 1932010165
  • ISBN13 978-1932010169
  • Language English
  • Author Liz Nakazawa
  • Publisher Ooligan Press; First Edition edition (June 1, 2007)
  • Pages 208
  • Formats rtf txt doc azw
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Poetry
  • Size ePub 1683 kb
  • Size Fb2 1644 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 774

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Deer Drink the Moon book. In Deer Drink the Moon, Liz Nakazawa brings together thirty-three poets to create a masterpiece of poetry about the state of Oregon

Deer Drink the Moon book. In Deer Drink the Moon, Liz Nakazawa brings together thirty-three poets to create a masterpiece of poetry about the state of Oregon. Organized thematically into seven of the state's ecoregions, this collection takes the reader on a statewide tour through poetry; beginning at the Pacific Ocean with William Stafford's "Waiting by the Sea," traveling through the Willamette Va In Deer Drink the Moon, Liz Nakazawa brings together thirty-three poets to create a masterpiece of poetry about the state of Oregon.

Deer Drink the Moon : Poems of Oregon.

Published June 1, 2007 by Ooligan Press.

It was designated as one of the Best 100 Books about Oregon in the last 100 Years by the Oregon State Librarian. It was also a Best Picks of Powell’s.

The moon although understands none of drinking, and The shadow just follows my body vainly Still I make the moon and the shadow my. .I lift the cup and invite the bright moon. My shadow opposite certainly makes us three

The moon although understands none of drinking, and The shadow just follows my body vainly Still I make the moon and the shadow my company To enjoy the springtime before too late. The moon lingers while I am singing The shadow scatters while I am dancing We cheer in delight when being awake We separate apart after getting drunk. My shadow opposite certainly makes us three. But the moon cannot drink, And my shadow follows the motions of my body in vain. For the briefest time are the moon and my shadow my companions.

A poem from my upcoming book Qun: Love is Unconditional. Then the intact moon, in fact, did unleash only when one popped out ahead of the rest

A poem from my upcoming book Qun: Love is Unconditional. Shofi Ahmed May 2017. Then the intact moon, in fact, did unleash only when one popped out ahead of the rest. One of his miracles was that he split the moon after some pagans asked him to show them a miracle to prove he is a prophet.

Deer Drink the Moon: Poems of Oregon Ed. Liz Nakazawa. Berkeley: California Council for the Humanities and Heyday Books, 1997. Dispossessed, An Oregon Story and The Caves. A Gathering of Spirit. Portland: Ooligan P, 2007 108-115. -. My Crush on the Yakima Woman and Companion. My Lover Is A Woman: Contemporary Lesbian Love Poems.

I’ve grown more reserved about how I treat books of poetry and no longer dog ear the pages of poems I.

I’ve grown more reserved about how I treat books of poetry and no longer dog ear the pages of poems I admire, but my copy of The Before Columbus Foundation Poetry Anthology: 1980-1990 is significantly fatter at the top due to all the pages I doubled down in college. The same goes for The Virago Book of Love Poetry. I enjoyed reading your post about anthologies. I organized it into seven ecoregions of Oregon, depending on what spot in the state inspired the poem.

Talk about Deer Drink the Moon: Poems of Oregon


Sat
Great poems with delicate and delicious words.
Quttaro
I read "Deer Drink the Moon" this summer. Being somewhat new to Oregon, I think it provides a geographic and spiritual journey for the newcomer, as well as a deepening experience for those who grew up around the places depicted by the thirty three authors. These poets find the beloved terrain of Oregon, from the Pacific coastline to the high desert, as their muse. The audience of "Deer Drink the Moon" extends beyond the avid poetry reader, however. Somewhere in this book is a story for every Oregon experience, written to rekindle that sense of discovery upon first seeing the Blue Mountains or the Willamette Valley, or to chart the course of every life occurring in Oregon right this moment. These works are not limited to pastoral descriptions, or the language equivalent of a landscape portrait. Each voice is born out of a life that is lived in Oregon. Vincent Wixon's "Eastern Oregon" depicts the life of old women living in portraits in small houses. Kim Stafford's "A Thousand Friends of Rain" personifies her desire to be many droplets of rain. Every poem brings to life a sense of yearning and imagination that stretches far beyond the expected limits of geographically inspired poetry.
Gtonydne
A good idea for an anthology and a good smattering of poems, but poorly realized.

The good:
~ Acceptable overview of better-known Oregon poets.
~ Good introduction to lesser-known Oregon poets from the rural parts of the state.
~ Some of the poems are very good.

The bad:
~ Theme. On the back-cover it says: "[O]rganized thematically into seven of the state's ecoregions." Well and good, but the editor needs to define what these ecoregions are, how they impact the poetry, and what makes each region and poet unique. If this was intended to be a book of environmental poetry, call it that, and explain that environment.

~ Layout/Graphics. Ugly, with a particularly muddled ecoregion map. Split across two-pages, the gray-scale map does not give us the information we need to assess location or ecoregion identity. In addition, while the collection represents poets from seven of the state's ecoregions, the map shows eight ecoregions - and doesn't explain them. These are trivial complaints, but indicative of the bigger problem: if you're basing this book on a belief that the poetry of each ecoregion varies from others within the state, the editor should explain this, and the map, graphics and book structure should further that message.

~In the editorial notes we read that a few "special man-made places" are included in the book. I suspect this was a bone thrown to satisfy those awkward critics demanding a human face in poetry. A handful of poems do include "special" man-made places, but the majority of poems circle around deer, sky and smoke interspersed with Indian place-names. Oregon is defined by a political boundary covering up to 10 disparate ecoregions - and the vast majority of 3.7 million (!) Oregonians live in a human landscape. The collection does not reflect this, but instead perpetuates a poetic myth of the Oregon experience.

~Author's Index. Every award and publication is listed, but little about the person themselves. (Age? Location? Persuasion? Oregonian? PSU? UO? OSU?) I don't really need to know (or care) that a poet won the Akron Poetry Prize, I want to know more about them, and where I can find his/her last book. Citing awards and fellowships heightens the provincialism ("...See they love him in Akron! That proves our poets exist on the national stage!")

Conclusion: an interesting idea, poorly realized. Ecoregions don't start or end at State borders, and borders don't explain the regions. I think the ecoregion approach (cf: an Environmental one) intriguing, and to that end I wish the editor had given more form to the work by explaining the methodology, and argued why Oregon poetry is both hindered and aided by our geographic differences, and how these differences (coast or mnts, dry or wet, urban or rural) impact those of us who live here.

The book is worth buying - to support poets off the beaten track, and to hear new voices - and the poems stand (or fall) on their own feet. But I wish the Editor had created more internal form and structure within the book to further these voices.
Tekasa
There are a variety of styles from many geographical
areas in Oregon. The poems are accessible and imagistic.
I have given this anthology to people who don't ordinarily
read poetry, and all have enjoyed it, as I did.