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Download The Inferno (Barnes Noble Classics Series) ePub

by Dante Alighieri,Peter Bondanella,Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Download The Inferno (Barnes  Noble Classics Series) ePub
  • ISBN 1593080514
  • ISBN13 978-1593080518
  • Language English
  • Author Dante Alighieri,Peter Bondanella,Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • Publisher Barnes & Noble Classics; Trade Paperback Edition edition (September 1, 2003)
  • Pages 352
  • Formats lrf lit rtf txt
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Poetry
  • Size ePub 1952 kb
  • Size Fb2 1416 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 944

&&LDIV&&R&&LDIV&&R&&LI&&RThe Inferno&&L/I&&R, by &&LB&&RDante Alighieri&&L/B&&R, is part of the &&LI&&RBarnes & Noble Classics&&L/I&&R&&LI&&R&&L/I&&Rseries, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of &&LI&&RBarnes & Noble Classics&&L/I&&R: &&LDIV&&RNew introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. &&LI&&RBarnes & Noble Classics &&L/I&&Rpulls together a constellation of influences―biographical, historical, and literary―to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.&&L/DIV&&R&&L/DIV&&R&&L/DIV&&R&&LDIV&&R&&LI&&R&&L/I&&R&&L/DIV&&R&&LDIV&&R&&LI&&RThe Inferno&&L/I&&R remains literature’s most hallowed and graphic vision of Hell. Dante plunges readers into this unforgettable world with a deceptively simple―and now legendary―tercet:&&LBR&&R&&LBR&&RMidway upon the journey of our life&&LBR&&RI found myself within a forest dark&&LBR&&RFor the straightforward pathway had been lost.&&LBR&&R&&LBR&&RWith these words, Dante plunges readers into the unforgettable world of the Inferno―one of the most graphic visions of Hell ever created. In this first part of the epic &&LI&&RThe Divine Comedy&&L/I&&R, Dante is led by the poet Virgil down into the nine circles of Hell, where he travels through nightmare landscapes of fetid cesspools, viper pits, frozen lakes, and boiling rivers of blood and witnesses sinners being beaten, burned, eaten, defecated upon, and torn to pieces by demons. Along the way he meets the most fascinating characters known to the classical and medieval world―the silver-tongued Ulysses, lustful Francesca da Rimini, the heretical Farinata degli Uberti, and scores of other intriguing and notorious figures.&&LBR&&R&&LBR&&RThis edition of the &&LI&&RInferno&&L/I&&R revives the famous Henry Wadsworth Longfellow translation, which first introduced Dante’s literary genius to a broad American audience. “Opening the book we stand face to face with the poet,” wrote William Dean Howells of Longfellow’s Dante, “and when his voice ceases we may marvel if he has not sung to us in his own Tuscan.” Lyrically graceful and brimming with startlingly vivid images, Dante’s Inferno is a perpetually engrossing classic that ranks with the greatest works of Homer and Shakespeare.&&LBR&&R&&LBR&&R&&LB&&RFeatures a map of Hell and illustrations by Gustave Doré.&&L/B&&R&&L/DIV&&R&&LDIV&&R&&LSTRONG&&R&&L/B&&R&&L/DIV&&R&&LDIV&&R&&LP style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"&&R&&LSTRONG&&RPeter Bondanella&&L/B&&R&&L/B&&R is Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature and Italian at Indiana University and a past president of the American Association for Italian Studies. His publications include a number of translations of Italian classics, books on Italian Renaissance literature and Italian cinema, and a dictionary of Italian literature. &&L/P&&R&&L/DIV&&R

Published by Barnes & Noble Books.

Published by Barnes & Noble Books.

Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of. .Books related to The Inferno (Barnes & Noble Classics Series).

Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of cal, historical, and literary-to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. The Inferno remains literature’s most hallowed and graphic vision of Hell. Peter Bondanella is Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature and Italian at Indiana University and a past president of the American Association for Italian Studies. His publications include a number of translations of Italian classics, books on Italian Renaissance literature and Italian cinema, and a dictionary of Italian literature.

The Paradiso (Barnes & Noble Classics Series). Peter Bondanella is Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature and Italian at Indiana University and has been President of the American Association for Italian Studies

The Paradiso (Barnes & Noble Classics Series). Peter Bondanella is Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature and Italian at Indiana University and has been President of the American Association for Italian Studies. His publications include a number of translations of Italian classics, books on Italian Renaissance literature, and studies of Italian cinema.

The Inferno, by Dante Alighieri, is part of the Barnes & Noble Class. Opening the book we stand face to face with the poet, wrote William Dean Howells of Longfellow’s Dante, and when his voice ceases we may marvel if he has not sung to us in his own Tuscan.

The Inferno, by Dante Alighieri, is part of. The Inferno remains literature's most hallowed and graphic vision of Hell.

New York : Barnes & Noble

by. Dante Alighieri, 1265-1321; Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 1807-1882; Bondanella, Peter . 1943-; Doré, Gustave, 1832-1883. New York : Barnes & Noble. The first part of Dante's classic poem of faith follows the author with his guide Virgil through the circles of hell, describing the sinners and punishments witnessed there.

Опубликовано: 21 апр. 2014 г. The Divine Comedy by Dante Aleghieri translated by Henry Wadsworth . АНТИМИР: изменение реальности. The Divine Comedy by Dante Aleghieri translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Inferno Canto 2. Категория.

Lyrically graceful and brimming with startlingly vivid images, Dante's Inferno is a perpetually engrossing classic that ranks with the greatest works of Homer and Shakespeare. amp;&LBR&&R&&LBR&&R&&LB&&RFeatures a map of Hell and illustrations by Gustave Doré. amp;&L/B&&R&&.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Explore our list of Barnes & Noble Classics, Books at Barnes & Noble®. Dante and Circles of Hell

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. What others are saying. Shop now & receive free express shipping with your Barnes & Noble Membership. Dante and Circles of Hell. Discover the best bookstore online-shop over 6 million books and million eBooks. Find bestsellers and debut books from new authors. Receive free express shipping with your Barnes & Noble Membership. The Purgatorio (Barnes & Noble Classics Series). The Purgatorio (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)Paperback.

Talk about The Inferno (Barnes Noble Classics Series)


Nilador
I highly recommend this translation of Dante's Inferno. For many years, Ciardi's translation has been the standard and it has much to recommend it. But Ciardi's rhymed stanzas are looser, wordier, and less faithful to the original than Thornton's blank verse. Thornton brings us closer to what Dante wrote. And the excellent notes at the end of each canto help bring this masterpiece to life for a modern reader.
Pedora
With decades of study and meticulous craftsmanship, Dr. Peter Thornton has offered his translation of “The Inferno.” I do not know Italian, but I have read a couple of other translations of “The Inferno,” and I found this one the best for several reasons. First, the poetry is vivid. I felt like orange flames and the stench of Sulphur were my companions as much as were Dante and Virgil.
The verse itself is a second reason I liked this translation. The meter – iambic pentameter, the ordinary meter of the English language – does not intrude into the poetry itself. That is, I wasn’t conscious of stretching of words or awkward diction for the sake of the meter.
You can enjoy the translation without bothering to read the footnotes, but once you start, you are off on another journey, equally absorbing – this one through contemporary (to Dante) Florentine history, Christian metaphors and allusions, Roman legend and mythology, and Catholic scholars from Augustine on.
Read the translation; savor the footnotes. There’s always room for a fresh version of hell.
Rrinel
THANK YOU !! I've been trying to expose my kids to more of the classics. But every translation of the Divine Comedy I've come across has been so difficult that I couldn't even get through Hell (felt like hell trying to read it). UNTIL NOW !!! Thank you Mr. Douglas Neff for this translation. It keeps all the flavor, tension, and character; and stays true to the original story. Reading this translation, I find myself more absorbed and engaged in trying to understand what Dante was trying to get across, and why he picked certain persons for certain levels, and doing research into some of the people, places, vices, etc. that he talks about, instead of spending hours trying to decipher the actual language of the translation. My 7 year old is totally engaged, while at the same time, my 15 year old and I are getting into some very interesting discussions (Dante put Pope Celestine V with those souls who neither heaven nor hell want, because he resigned as Pope . . . I wonder what that means for old former pope Benedict XVI / cardinal Ratzinger who just did the same thing). And none of us are getting ground down by having to stop and try and translate the language.

I cannot encourage you strongly enough to get this book. You will not be disappointed. I'm now trying to find a comparable translation of Purgatory and Paradise so we can complete the story.
Togor
Dante's THE INFERNO is a classic. Written around 1321, the book predates most of the classics, except Homer's works of course. But even before Shakespeare, this book heralded in an uncommonly twisted and almost perverse story of Dante's descent into Hell and his description of everything he sees and those he meets. It's eloquently written. Not necessarily an easy read but it does tribute to the language and reminds the reader that our vernacular has so much more color than the reductio ad absurdum we see being used today. Dante's descriptions of the nightmare that sinners endure at each level is pretty graphic, sometimes bordering on horrifying, and who knows, he might even be credited with the first narrative on the subject of flesh-eating zombies which are so popular today. The narrative also gives the reader a feel for certain historical relevancies of that and earlier times and how Dante saw the world. This particular version of the book, by John Ciardi, provides excellent descriptive notes after each section, clarifying things mentioned in the story so the reader stays on track. Lastly, I could not help but wonder if the Vatican of that time didn't encourage the book to be written simply because of its thematic message of what happens to sinners, particularly those who sin against God and the Church or become apostates. It certainly provides compelling imagery to anyone who believes in Heaven and Hell. Add it to your reading arsenal - it's worth the read.