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Download Paul Celan and Martin Heidegger: An Unresolved Conversation, 1951–1970 ePub

by James K. Lyon

Download Paul Celan and Martin Heidegger: An Unresolved Conversation, 1951–1970 ePub
  • ISBN 0801883024
  • ISBN13 978-0801883026
  • Language English
  • Author James K. Lyon
  • Publisher Johns Hopkins University Press; 1 edition (February 22, 2006)
  • Pages 264
  • Formats lit mbr txt doc
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Poetry
  • Size ePub 1610 kb
  • Size Fb2 1252 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 648

This work explores the troubled relationship and unfinished intellectual dialogue between Paul Celan, regarded by many as the most important European poet after 1945, and Martin Heidegger, perhaps the most influential figure in twentieth-century philosophy. It centers on the persistent ambivalence Celan, a Holocaust survivor, felt toward a thinker who respected him and at times promoted his poetry. Celan, although strongly affected by Heidegger's writings, struggled to reconcile his admiration of Heidegger's ideas on literature with his revulsion at the thinker's Nazi past. That Celan and Heidegger communicated with each other over a number of years, and in a controversial encounter, met in 1967, is well known. The full duration, extent, and nature of their exchanges and their impact on Celan's poetics has been less understood, however.

In the first systematic analysis of their relationship between 1951 and 1970, James K. Lyon describes how the poet and the philosopher read and responded to each other's work throughout the period. He offers new information about their interactions before, during, and after their famous 1967 meeting at Todtnauberg. He suggests that Celan, who changed his account of that meeting, may have contributed to misreadings of his poem "Todtnauberg." Finally, Lyon discusses their two last meetings after 1967 before the poet's death three years later.

Drawing heavily on documentary material―including Celan's reading notes on more than two dozen works by Heidegger, the philosopher's written response to the poet's "Meridian" speech, and references to Heidegger in Celan's letters―Lyon presents a focused perspective on this critical aspect of the poet's intellectual development and provides important insights into his relationship with Heidegger, transforming previous conceptions of it.


This work explores the troubled relationship and unfinished intellectual dialogue between Paul Celan, regarded by many as the most important European poet after 1945, and Martin Heidegger, perhaps the most influential figure in twentieth-century philosophy.

Start by marking Paul Celan and Martin Heidegger: An Unresolved .

Start by marking Paul Celan and Martin Heidegger: An Unresolved Conversation, 1951–1970 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. James K. Lyon documents this uneasy relationship One of Paul Celan's most widely-known works is "Todtnauberg", which enigmatically documents the poet and Holocaust survivor's meeting with the philosopher and unrepentant Nazi supporter Martin Heidegger. I thought this book was great-lots of critics will talk about Celan's negative feelings towards Heidegger, especially in relation to "Todtnauberg," but I have not read anything else which so obviously shows Celan's deep and complicated debt toward Heidegger.

That Celan and Heidegger communicated with each other over a number of years, and in a controversial encounter .

That Celan and Heidegger communicated with each other over a number of years, and in a controversial encounter, met in 1967, is well known. The full duration, extent, and nature of their exchanges and their impact on Celan's poetics has been less understood, however. In the first systematic analysis of their relationship between 1951 and 1970, James K. Lyon describes how the poet and the philosopher read and responded to each other's work throughout the period. He offers new information about their interactions before, during, and after their famous 1967 meeting at Todtnauberg.

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Paul Celan and Martin He. .has been added to your Cart. Lyon succeeds in presenting the explicit and implicit relation between the major philosopher and the most challenging poet of twentieth-century Europe, Martin Heidegger and Paul Celan, with much sound and original scholarship and ample coverage of what was already known. He provides a full chronological and topical picture of the philosophical, poetic, and personal issues that both bind and distance the two men, while at the same time, ultimately letting the reader decide how to assess their crucial relationship.

Similar books and articles. A Conversation with Martin Heidegger. Raymond Tallis - 2002 - Palgrave. Heidegger Martin - 1958 - Twayne Publishers. Quand Gadamer lit Paul Celan. Martin Bidney - 1998 - International Studies in Philosophy 30 (4):118-120. Seed of wolf: Celan, Adorno and poetry after Auschwitz. Ricardo Ibarlucía - 1999 - Trans/Form/Ação 21 (1):131-150. On the Theological Background of Heidegger's Philosophical Reading of the Letters of Paul.

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: James K. Lyon’s monograph is a thorough and carefully argued analysis of the relationship. Published: 1 January 2008.

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and Martin Heidegger : An Unresolved Conversation, 1951-1970.

Paul Celan and Martin Heidegger : An Unresolved Conversation, 1951-1970. This work explores the troubled relationship and unfinished intellectual dialogue between Paul Celan, regarded by many as the most important European poet after 1945, and Martin Heidegger, perhaps the most influential figure in twentieth-century philosophy. It centers on the persistent ambivalence Celan, a Holocaust survivor, felt toward a thinker who respected him and at times promoted his poetry.