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Download Radio, Radio (Walt Whitman Award of the Academy of American Poets) ePub

by Ben Doyle

Download Radio, Radio (Walt Whitman Award of the Academy of American Poets) ePub
  • ISBN 0807126780
  • ISBN13 978-0807126783
  • Language English
  • Author Ben Doyle
  • Publisher Louisiana State University Press; 1st edition (March 1, 2001)
  • Pages 71
  • Formats mbr lrf lit docx
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Poetry
  • Size ePub 1166 kb
  • Size Fb2 1812 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 410

Radio, Radio, Ben Doyle's first collection, is a book about gaps: between the transmitter and the desired, unimaginable receiver; between the prehistoric insect world and our fast-food, hot-wired culture; between words and what they just might mean. They meet us in the interstices between the moment just gone and the next one, with little agenda but to thrill, refresh, discomfit, and warn.

Doyle's poems leap freely from sestina to sonnet to fragment to prose, searching for what they do not know. These are lyrics of serious intelligence -- they think carefully and deliberately but use often startling images and varied, original musics to deepen, widen, and rudder this thinking: "In the middle of every field, / obscured from the side by grass / or cornhusks, is a clearing where / she works burying swans alive / into the black earth" ("Radio, Radio").

Alternately playful, grim, realistic, surreal, tempered, associative, wise, and astonished, Radio, Radio finds an original niche in the poetry of the day, one that uses the veneer of contemporary poetics to reflect the human mind and soul that lie beneath.


It is made possible by financial support from the members of the Academy of American Poets.

The winning manuscript, chosen by an acclaimed poet, is published by Graywolf Press, a leading independent publisher committed to the discovery and energetic publication of contemporary American and international literature. The winner also receives an all-expenses-paid six-week residency at the Civitella Ranieri Center in the Umbrian region of Italy, and distribution of the winning book to thousands of Academy of American Poets members. It is made possible by financial support from the members of the Academy of American Poets.

The Academy of American Poets is a national, member-supported organization that promotes poets and the art of poetry. The nonprofit organization was incorporated in the state of New York in 1934

The Academy of American Poets is a national, member-supported organization that promotes poets and the art of poetry. The nonprofit organization was incorporated in the state of New York in 1934. org, the syndicated series Poem-a-Day, American Poets magazine, readings and events, and poetry resources for K-12 educators

The Walt Whitman Award is a poetry award administered by the Academy of American Poets. Named after poet Walt Whitman, the award is based on a competition of book-length poetry manuscripts by American poets who have not yet published a book

The Walt Whitman Award is a poetry award administered by the Academy of American Poets. Named after poet Walt Whitman, the award is based on a competition of book-length poetry manuscripts by American poets who have not yet published a book.

Radio, Radio, Ben Doyle's first collection, is a book about gaps: between the transmitter and the desired . And it is these words that best summarize Doyle's debut volume, winner of the prestigious Walt Whitman Award from the POETRY Society of America for a first book of POETRY.

Radio, Radio, Ben Doyle's first collection, is a book about gaps: between the transmitter and the desired, unimaginable receiver; between the prehistoric insect world and our fast-food, hot-wired culture; between words and what they just might mean. They meet us in the interstices between the moment just gone and the next one, with little agenda but to thrill, refresh, discomfit, and warn.

Walter "Walt" Whitman (; May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, and journalist. Whitman is among the most influential poets in the American canon, often called the father of free verse. His work was very controversial in its time, particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was described as obscene for its overt sexuality. Born in Huntington on Long Island, Whitman worked as a journalist, a teacher, a government clerk, and-in.

Walt Whitman is America’s world poet-a latter-day successor to Homer, Virgil, Dante, and Shakespeare. For the Sake of People’s Poetry. And as the first writer of a truly American poetry, Whitman’s legacy endures. Poems by Walt Whitman.

Walt Whitman: Poems study guide contains a biography of Walt Whitman, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions .

Walt Whitman: Poems study guide contains a biography of Walt Whitman, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. Ralph Waldo Emerson, one of the founders of the Transcendentalist movement, wrote in a letter to Walt Whitman in 1855, "I greet you at the beginning of a great career. Emerson went on to be a major influence on Whitman's poetry. Ezra Pound, a well-known poet in the late 19th century and early 20th century, wrote a poem titled "The Pact," the subject of which was Whitman himself.

The cover of the book is clean but has a light amount of wear. Pages are in excellent condition and there are no notes, highlighting, or underlining within the book. Yes, the is ancestor to the poet, as well as the subject of one of the finer poems in the 1993 winner of the Academy of American Poets' Walt Whitman Award. Deming's work is deeply based in her New England life and landscape with its omnipresent ocean, beaching whales, and dense history.

Walt Whitman is considered one of America's greatest poets. Walt Whitman (May 31, 1819–March 26, 1892) is one of the most significant American writers of the 19th century, and many critics consider him the nation's greatest poet

Walt Whitman is considered one of America's greatest poets. Learn more about his life and work. Walt Whitman (May 31, 1819–March 26, 1892) is one of the most significant American writers of the 19th century, and many critics consider him the nation's greatest poet. In addition to writing poetry, Whitman worked as a journalist and volunteered in military hospitals. Fast Facts: Walt Whitman. Known For : Whitman is one of the most famous American poets of the 19th century. Born : May 31, 1819 in West Hills, New York.

Talk about Radio, Radio (Walt Whitman Award of the Academy of American Poets)


greed style
How do you review poetry, really, except to say that it touches you. There is a feel to Doyle's poetry that, like all good art, is elusive.
Adrietius
Ben Doyle's "Radio, Radio" pretty much stretches the limit of what experimental poetry can do and crosses the line a little bit. If a poet like Susan Howe recommends it, you know you have to read it: and this is not workshop material. This is an expansive trek across the forever Now that make up our lives. It is absolutely evidence of a poet who has *worked*: he reminds me of Leslie Scalapino, somewhat of Ashbery but not in any kitsch or careerist sense, and it is absolutely an example of exceptional poetry.
INvait
Let me tell you what I think phenomenology is. It's a game. The object is to keep the world in your head. But stuff all the world in your head, and your head gets confused. And while it's trying to sort it all out phenomenology happens. Just like that! And whatever you've kept in your brain, that's the world. Or it's all the world you're going to experience the phenomena of.

Now let me tell you what Ben Doller (ne Doyle) is. He is a twisty-tie. I'm not kidding. Have you seen a picture of him? He's skinny like a cartoon skinny. He's taller than a plank of wood. And if I was any good at drawing, I'd show you how easy it is to draw him twisting his body into a piece of wire that's very pliant at the waist. lt would bring me great pleasure, in fact, to paste his head on a wire that was already twisted, just to make my point.

Now we're ready to read Radio, Radio. It's a twisty tie. That was easy.

It's like the twisty tie that's been on that loaf of bread all week, and when you take it off, it's got those permanent elbows in them. You can be pretty sure Ben Doller has pointy elbows. And if you're inside one of the poems here, those elbows, and the angular relationship they're having with some other elbows is like the phenomenology in Radio, Radio. Because each of the poems' images is so specifically sensed by the speaker. At the extreme there is "Ten Minutes," a poem that seems to have trapped ten minutes of coffee house culture inside a tin box. The most annoying ten minutes. At the other extreme is "Canary Islands," where all civilization's distractions, from jackhammers to Spanish accents, keep getting in the way of a simple prayer.

You know what's great about writing a book of phenomenological poems, aside from the obvious fact: it sounds like the poems are pointing out how phenomenal they are? You get to live in confusion. That's what Doller has done best in this book. He lives in this phenomenal, delightful confusion, where all those things he stuffed into his brain don't spell themselves out, and I don't think he wants them spelled out. In the title poem, "Radio, Radio," where a woman has worked in a field to bury swans up to their necks, it seems like the world of the phenomenologist is much more interesting. Maybe this is what every field of wheat looks like. Swans' necks! It's desperate! It's the inside of a radio! It's a good way to make that woman your friend!

Who knows how the mind works? And in Ben Doller's (ne Doyle) case, I'm more interested in that skill where he steps out of the world's way so that it can have its way inside his brain. Radio, Radio is mainly a book of poetry where the poet proves how adept he is at placing things at weird angles, and in turn making you happy that weird angles exist. If a publisher could make Doller's brain a curio cabinet filled with animatronic toys, Radio, Radio is the poetry equivalent.
Jake
Whenever I hear someone gripe about creative writing programs dire influence over American Poetry, it is usually clear that "someone" was unable to secure a spot at a creative writing program of choice. Jealousy aside, why not attempt to actually say something substanitive about why a group of poems does not fufill you as a reader.
Who knows how a first book of poems will hold up over time, but it is clear that the formal, irreverent, intelligent and purely mad wit at work in "Radio, Radio" is the real thing. Many of the poems employ dark tones that cohere through a Keatsian style of moving into the imagination and back out to the actual so repeatedly and so quickly that the senses can longer distinguish the two. Keats is after all the major influence at work here and these poems accordingly are lyric and obsessive. Many people who haven't studied Keats closely will only see the influence as it is filtered through contemporaries like Ashbery or Tate and cry foul, but the influence is hardly obscured--an early (and the best) poem in the collection paraphrases "Ode to a Nightingale" repeatedly. This is an immensely enjoyable collection of poems. I for one will be rereading it, and I suspect other readers will enjoy it just as much.
Daizil
a book I can go to like I used to go to Championship Vinyl when I was a wee teen. By which I mean it's nice to find a book that's lively, full of life (rangingly intellectual without the defensive hang-ups of the didactically theoretical, not afraid of the body, not afraid, thankfully, of sentiment), that seems to enjoy language for its very balance between precision and imprecision, between the vertical depth of its etymology and its narcotic pharmacology. The book runs through the self-assured poses of the Rock 'n Roll-auteur...but they're just that, "poses", linguistic tricks, gestures, and acrobatics tried on at dizzying speeds in an attempt to counteract the underlying sense of ennui and emotional defeat attendant with (sorry) millenial America. Go to these as you might go to see a great band -- Built to Spill, GBV, the Replacements circa 1984 (yes the poems are a bit drunk at times) -- partly for the way in which their virtuosity allows escape and partly for the way in which they bring you back to what you want to escape from, newly charged. Sure, these poems might do a line of coke with your girlfriend in a bathroom stall, but when they come back out they still have the heart to buy you a drink and give you a ride home. In the end, these poems are hyper-kinetically intelligent, formally blinding, full of sweet bravado, and tuned into an ultra-high frequency. They're also fun. Judging by the comments of some others on here I'd say that may be a problem for some people....